Thinking about going to school to become a Vet Tech, questions & thoughts..??

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JD in Collinsville, Illinois

15 months ago

Its a good idea to get some experience from a vet hosptial. Each place is different on what they will let you do. Start out cleaning kennels, walking pets outside. Show interest in learning. The people in my experience that have done that end up doing very well skills come with practice. I have no certification but like I said, I was a tech. I was the go to person for my coworkers. I had Keys to the building. All from hands on experience. The CVTs that work there didnt make more than i did. It all depends on where you work and what they will allow. I have a question though hoping msmelvet could help me. It seems like you have been around. I have been in the field now for 7 years. I dont really want to work in an animal hospital any more i dont think. I would like to be in a lab, zoo, or specialty clinic but im pretty sure I would need cert. Do you have any advise? Is there a test or something I could possible take for cert. I am a single mom with a morgage. I need to get back to work asap. Really dont want to have to take the whole course if It can be avoided. Any Suggestions?

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Msmelvet27 in Stony Point, New York

15 months ago

Hey JD so just for your FYI, you don't need a certificate to be a veterinary assistant. Those companies who do that are basically stealing your money since you learn these skills on the job. And yes you are right, it is illegal for vet tech to perform surgery but not to monitor the anesthesia and assist. However, to be a vet tech you have to go to school. What you can try to do is take the VTNE exam depending on your state regulations. But, if you have enough experience and know your farm animals you can try to take this exam. However, most states require you to be a graduate from a vet tech program so you have to look up your state regulations. And, I totally hear you about going back to school can take up more time then needed but if you do want to work in lab or zoology they require LVT or CVT. I heard people who went to school and obtained their bachelor's in zoology but have to clean up feces all day. And, if your state requires you to go to school to sit for the VTNE exam you can do online courses..penn foster has a program and they work at your pace (2 yr program-associates in applied science). For specialty clinics they do run emergency clinics too and usually are 24/7. You can try to apply to specialty facilities based on your experience if they don't require LVT or CVT. I hope I was helpful. Here is also a website for the VTNE exam...

www.aavsb.org/VTNE/eligibility%20for%20first%20timers/

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AV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

15 months ago

I have mixed feelings after reading all the different comments about vet techs.. msmelvet27 what school are you attending? I was looking into pennfoster bc I cant find a school that is not crazy expensive.. i hope you dont get what you pay for in this case..

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

15 months ago

There are several online schools that are AVMA accredited and actually will allow you to continue your education should you decide to get a bachelors degree. I have heard that St. Petersburg will not accept a degree from Penn Foster for application to their bachelors degree program.

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Miranda in Redondo Beach, California

13 months ago

Does anybody know if this site is accurate when it comes to the general schooling process?

vettechschools.weebly.com

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

13 months ago

It is't "way off the deep end", but it certainly isn't totally accurate either.
For example, not all states license veterinary technicians and in fact and CVTs aren't typically licensed but rather voluntarily credentialed through a professional association not a state licensing board. Nor is the VTNE a state board exam.

What questions do you have about becoming a veterinary technician?

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Kelley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

13 months ago

I hope I can get some infomation about vet techs? I really am interested in working with animals but the pay I hear isnt that great. I have two kids and I need to make a living, but there isnt anything that interest me besides working with animals. I just want to know how much do they really make? And could I work at a zoo. I really want to work at a zoo and not a vet clinic. Thanks for any info.

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Kelley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

13 months ago

Does anyone know anything about Manor College vet tech program?

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Crehders in Twentynine Palms, California

13 months ago

For those of you that have completed the San Juan program can you tell me if you have to be getting paid during clinicals? I was wondering because I live in an area where I'm going to have to drive an hour away to the closest place that will let me intern, but it is unpaid. Thanks in advance!

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samore in New York, New York

12 months ago

Hello. I need some advice . I am currently a vet assistant for an office for a year. And i was accepted to two schools for vet tech. The vet institute in pittsburgh pa and mercy college in dobbs ferry ny. The vet tech in pa is accredited and will be 18 months for associates. But after that if i want to go get a bachlors i cant since they dont transfer. Mercy college is a private 4 year college with vet tech and pre clincial medicine for veterinarian. The problem is it is expensive... Over 80k for the 4 years. My question is in this field does it really matter on a bachlor degree or an associates as long as i become certified by passing the nys vet tech exam? Im really unsure what to do . 33k vs 80+ k. I dont want to goto a 4 year college and leave to find a job that could of saved me money with just an associates . Do employeers have no problem hiring someone that graduated from the vet tech institute? Thank u and hope to hear from u soon. I have to decide by may 1st

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mellylovesdogs in Garnerville, New York

12 months ago

Hi Samore. I can see your conflict. I took a semester at Mercy College. Its a good school but you learn more about the books than you do hands on with the animals. I have meet some graduates from there who turn out to be great techs. However, I am more of a learn hands on person. There are plenty of other closer schools for a 2 yr program. And most vets don't care as long as you are educated and are licensed tech. LaGuardia community college & Bergen Community College are AAHA accredited, and Westchester community college (not accredited yet) just started a tech program. I can't say much about Westchester but I know graduates from LaGuardia and I'm about to be a graduate from Bergen. I think it would be beneficial and financially better to go with the 2yr program and you get to sit for the licensing exam sooner. You can also check out AAHA.org has their own 2 yr program they have online. I hope I helped you out.

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mellylovesdogs aka msmelvet27 in Garnerville, New York

12 months ago

AV,

I am attending Bergen Community college. Its in paramus, nj. Its a great program! the professors are very knowledge and helpful.

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samore1 in Brooklyn, New York

12 months ago

hi this is samore but I couldn't log onto the samore I had to make another name. I was all registered for LaGuardia and then they told us the first day most of us wont make it and they were only accepting 38top GPA students out of 400. so we needed to get all A's. So I transferred right out because I felt if I struggle and get a B id be wasting my time. For Bergen I have to take Chemistry before even trying to get into the program and when I looked they were limited students as well. I am going next week to check out the VTI in Pittsburgh.

Do you think companies look to see where you graduated or just see if your certified and have some degree. The VTI is certified and I would be finished in 18 months. I just want to make sure jobs don't dislike hiring someone that graduated from an institute rather then a college. I heard the same thing with BA vs Associate degree that places just want you to pass the NYS test. it doesn't matter what degree you have. I hope that's alright. if I do goto VTI I wont be able to get my BA degree later on.

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msmelvet27 in Garnerville, New York

12 months ago

Companies do see where you graduate but if you choose VTI in Pittsburgh you cannot transfer those credits. Your money would be flush down the drain if you want to get your bachelor's later and have to start all over again. As for LaGuardia its a tough program and if you don't want to struggle you don't have to. Most tech programs anyway require a chemistry course in order to understand the pharmacokinetics of the drugs. Bergen just recently started receiving more students lately because this profession is growing more rapidly, but as long as you have a B or B+ average you can make it into the program. If your looking for short cuts in this field there really isn't any. Its a lot of hard work, commitment, and pouring money out of your pockets. Such as vaccines, background checks, textbooks, farm camp, and VTNE fee exam. If you really want to be in this field these are some things you must consider before taking the offical dive. Its a lot of science and math, an area that all technicians have to master. I hoped a helped with your decision-making processs.

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Angela Pena in Albuquerque, New Mexico

12 months ago

KR in King William, Virginia said: Angela, I'd personally stay far away from Penn Foster, they had provisional accreditation, it dropped to probational and now is back at provisional, as far as I know, they still have a program director that is neither a LVT/CVT/RVT or a DVM, and the AVMA is making it a new requirement for accreditation by 2013 , that they must have this. If your program is not accredited, you cannot sit for boards, and then really, what is the point in going through school. I know of a couple people going through San Juan, I just personally do not prefer programs without selective admission. There are several great distance learning programs though to check out, look at www.avma.org/education/cvea/vettech_distance_learning.asp
for a list, I would go for a fully accredited program over provisional, just because the provisional programs are newer, ask questions, find out what their board pass rate is, intake numbers vs grad numbers (IMO, the better programs weed through alot of people, thus the lower grad numbers) Good luck.

I ended up going to CNM and I will be applying to the Vet tech Associate of Applied Science Degree Program here in a few weeks. I hear nothing but good things about CNM's program. I am excited to start taking the classes but I still have some concerns. Will I be able to get a good paying job with an AAS Degree?

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Sara in Bigelow, Minnesota

11 months ago

isabella in Buffalo, Minnesota said: I am in school online for a vet technician it is 100% online except for I still need my clinicals but I love animals

What school are you going to that's completely online? I'd like their info!

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uname in Milford, Michigan

11 months ago

Kelley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: I hope I can get some infomation about vet techs? I really am interested in working with animals but the pay I hear isnt that great. I have two kids and I need to make a living, but there isnt anything that interest me besides working with animals. I just want to know how much do they really make? And could I work at a zoo. I really want to work at a zoo and not a vet clinic. Thanks for any info.

I don't know what the pay is like in Philadelphia, but I work in a very upscale neighborhood vet clinic in Michigan and barely make $20k. I'm not licensed but I might make $5-10k more if I was. It also depends on where you work, some emergencies or specialist techs make a little bit more, or even the "chain" vets like VCA might pay more. I work at a poorly managed, always understaffed private practice. It's a lot of hard work, very little respect and not enough pay in my opinion.

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Cathy in Kennesaw, Georgia

10 months ago

I'm wondering if age (40s) is a major consideration for employing people once they have vet tech certification. I have experience working in vet clinics and kennels, and have volunteered with my local humane society and nearest zoo. I would love to work with animals again but get paid more of a living wage. If I got the two year degree and certification, what would the typical salary be going out? I would be willing to relocate.

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Dog Girl in Austin, Texas

7 months ago

Brooke in Manchester, Tennessee said: I am 21 years old. I have just finished up my general studies & I am deciding on either going to a 2 year program to become a vet tech or going to a university & going into the medical field or teaching field.
I have a huge passion for animals & I have always wanted a job working with animals since I was little. I can't afford Veterinarian school, it's impossible. I have done some research & seen that vet tech's only make about 20k-30k a year, thats pretty much nothing.. especially now in today's economy.
I don't have any interest in medicine or medical stuff dealing with people, but I'm afraid thats what I may need/have to do to make a decent living & get a secure job.
What are you guys thoughts about it? Should you go to school for something you love and worry about money the rest of your life? Or get a job you don't enjoy but never have to worry about financial problems?
I'm pretty torn between the two & I have to decide pretty soon.
I've also heard people leave the vet tech field 7-10 years into it.. so I don't want to end up hating that career either after 7 years and have to go back to school at 30!
So, please someone give me some good advice! People keep telling me to do what I love, but it's hard to believe them when they are going to school or went to school just to get a job making a lot of money?

I would go with your passion! Always! I am having the same delimmea sp. right now, only its flipped around! I choose a degree in the medical field, chasing the dream of money and stability... Now I am in my thirties chasing my true dream and passion of working with animals! I realize I will not make as much money but at the end of the work day, when I am fullfilled, satisfied and HAPPY at my job I realize thats more important than any amount of money! : ) I hoped this helped!

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brittdavis in Thayne, Wyoming

6 months ago

isabella in Buffalo, Minnesota said: I am in school online for a vet technician it is 100% online except for I still need my clinicals but I love animals

Isabella, where are you going to school at?

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eagertofly in Belfast, United Kingdom

6 months ago

The one clue I would give anyone thinking of going in to this business. Are you an animal person through and through? Are you prepared for the good and the bad? Also frankly what is your background with animals? Employers want to know what is your practical skills with animals? The books teach certain things but in this business it is hands on practical skills that count and matter and oh yes also must have people skills along with animal skills. Are you prepared to get messy? Are you prepared to see animals put down because frankly the owner cant afford to pay for an operation? Are you prepared for the negatives as well as the positives? Their are tons of positives but then their is the other side.

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Laura RVT in Cincinnati, Ohio

5 months ago

I just wanted to say that I graduated from Vet Tech Institute and it may depend on the location, but I actually feel like I got a lot out of my degree. Yes, it was fast paced and a lot of material being thrown at you at once. Although I don't regret going there other than the fact it was 30K, but it was the only school in my area with the next closest being Purdue University which was 2.5 hours away. Although I will say that probably less than 25% of my class passed their boards, but I just think they were too immature and thought they were going to go in and pass with flying colors without studying at all. I studied my ass off for the VTNE (3-4 months in advance), so I guess it just depends on how motivated you are and use class time and your notes to learn everything you possibly can, or to just skate by.

I feel that Brown Mackie is one of the worst colleges ever. We had a new technician come in (that hadn't even sat for her boards yet and wasn't taking that seriously) and she didn't even know how to read a PCV. She was completely clueless. She was also a new technician that came in acting like she knew everything and tried to tell our head technician of over 35 years how to do a dental. She was gone after about 2 months. Not to mention the fact that all she did was stand around and talk.

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