Thinking about going to school to become a Vet Tech, questions & thoughts..??

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AV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

43 months ago

I have mixed feelings after reading all the different comments about vet techs.. msmelvet27 what school are you attending? I was looking into pennfoster bc I cant find a school that is not crazy expensive.. i hope you dont get what you pay for in this case..

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

43 months ago

There are several online schools that are AVMA accredited and actually will allow you to continue your education should you decide to get a bachelors degree. I have heard that St. Petersburg will not accept a degree from Penn Foster for application to their bachelors degree program.

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Miranda in Redondo Beach, California

41 months ago

Does anybody know if this site is accurate when it comes to the general schooling process?

vettechschools.weebly.com

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

41 months ago

It is't "way off the deep end", but it certainly isn't totally accurate either.
For example, not all states license veterinary technicians and in fact and CVTs aren't typically licensed but rather voluntarily credentialed through a professional association not a state licensing board. Nor is the VTNE a state board exam.

What questions do you have about becoming a veterinary technician?

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Kelley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

41 months ago

I hope I can get some infomation about vet techs? I really am interested in working with animals but the pay I hear isnt that great. I have two kids and I need to make a living, but there isnt anything that interest me besides working with animals. I just want to know how much do they really make? And could I work at a zoo. I really want to work at a zoo and not a vet clinic. Thanks for any info.

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Kelley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

41 months ago

Does anyone know anything about Manor College vet tech program?

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Crehders in Twentynine Palms, California

40 months ago

For those of you that have completed the San Juan program can you tell me if you have to be getting paid during clinicals? I was wondering because I live in an area where I'm going to have to drive an hour away to the closest place that will let me intern, but it is unpaid. Thanks in advance!

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samore in New York, New York

40 months ago

Hello. I need some advice . I am currently a vet assistant for an office for a year. And i was accepted to two schools for vet tech. The vet institute in pittsburgh pa and mercy college in dobbs ferry ny. The vet tech in pa is accredited and will be 18 months for associates. But after that if i want to go get a bachlors i cant since they dont transfer. Mercy college is a private 4 year college with vet tech and pre clincial medicine for veterinarian. The problem is it is expensive... Over 80k for the 4 years. My question is in this field does it really matter on a bachlor degree or an associates as long as i become certified by passing the nys vet tech exam? Im really unsure what to do . 33k vs 80+ k. I dont want to goto a 4 year college and leave to find a job that could of saved me money with just an associates . Do employeers have no problem hiring someone that graduated from the vet tech institute? Thank u and hope to hear from u soon. I have to decide by may 1st

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mellylovesdogs in Garnerville, New York

40 months ago

Hi Samore. I can see your conflict. I took a semester at Mercy College. Its a good school but you learn more about the books than you do hands on with the animals. I have meet some graduates from there who turn out to be great techs. However, I am more of a learn hands on person. There are plenty of other closer schools for a 2 yr program. And most vets don't care as long as you are educated and are licensed tech. LaGuardia community college & Bergen Community College are AAHA accredited, and Westchester community college (not accredited yet) just started a tech program. I can't say much about Westchester but I know graduates from LaGuardia and I'm about to be a graduate from Bergen. I think it would be beneficial and financially better to go with the 2yr program and you get to sit for the licensing exam sooner. You can also check out AAHA.org has their own 2 yr program they have online. I hope I helped you out.

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mellylovesdogs aka msmelvet27 in Garnerville, New York

40 months ago

AV,

I am attending Bergen Community college. Its in paramus, nj. Its a great program! the professors are very knowledge and helpful.

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samore1 in Brooklyn, New York

39 months ago

hi this is samore but I couldn't log onto the samore I had to make another name. I was all registered for LaGuardia and then they told us the first day most of us wont make it and they were only accepting 38top GPA students out of 400. so we needed to get all A's. So I transferred right out because I felt if I struggle and get a B id be wasting my time. For Bergen I have to take Chemistry before even trying to get into the program and when I looked they were limited students as well. I am going next week to check out the VTI in Pittsburgh.

Do you think companies look to see where you graduated or just see if your certified and have some degree. The VTI is certified and I would be finished in 18 months. I just want to make sure jobs don't dislike hiring someone that graduated from an institute rather then a college. I heard the same thing with BA vs Associate degree that places just want you to pass the NYS test. it doesn't matter what degree you have. I hope that's alright. if I do goto VTI I wont be able to get my BA degree later on.

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msmelvet27 in Garnerville, New York

39 months ago

Companies do see where you graduate but if you choose VTI in Pittsburgh you cannot transfer those credits. Your money would be flush down the drain if you want to get your bachelor's later and have to start all over again. As for LaGuardia its a tough program and if you don't want to struggle you don't have to. Most tech programs anyway require a chemistry course in order to understand the pharmacokinetics of the drugs. Bergen just recently started receiving more students lately because this profession is growing more rapidly, but as long as you have a B or B+ average you can make it into the program. If your looking for short cuts in this field there really isn't any. Its a lot of hard work, commitment, and pouring money out of your pockets. Such as vaccines, background checks, textbooks, farm camp, and VTNE fee exam. If you really want to be in this field these are some things you must consider before taking the offical dive. Its a lot of science and math, an area that all technicians have to master. I hoped a helped with your decision-making processs.

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angelapena in Albuquerque, New Mexico

39 months ago

KR in King William, Virginia said: Angela, I'd personally stay far away from Penn Foster, they had provisional accreditation, it dropped to probational and now is back at provisional, as far as I know, they still have a program director that is neither a LVT/CVT/RVT or a DVM, and the AVMA is making it a new requirement for accreditation by 2013 , that they must have this. If your program is not accredited, you cannot sit for boards, and then really, what is the point in going through school. I know of a couple people going through San Juan, I just personally do not prefer programs without selective admission. There are several great distance learning programs though to check out, look at www.avma.org/education/cvea/vettech_distance_learning.asp
for a list, I would go for a fully accredited program over provisional, just because the provisional programs are newer, ask questions, find out what their board pass rate is, intake numbers vs grad numbers (IMO, the better programs weed through alot of people, thus the lower grad numbers) Good luck.

I ended up going to CNM and I will be applying to the Vet tech Associate of Applied Science Degree Program here in a few weeks. I hear nothing but good things about CNM's program. I am excited to start taking the classes but I still have some concerns. Will I be able to get a good paying job with an AAS Degree?

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Sara in Bigelow, Minnesota

39 months ago

isabella in Buffalo, Minnesota said: I am in school online for a vet technician it is 100% online except for I still need my clinicals but I love animals

What school are you going to that's completely online? I'd like their info!

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uname in Milford, Michigan

39 months ago

Kelley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: I hope I can get some infomation about vet techs? I really am interested in working with animals but the pay I hear isnt that great. I have two kids and I need to make a living, but there isnt anything that interest me besides working with animals. I just want to know how much do they really make? And could I work at a zoo. I really want to work at a zoo and not a vet clinic. Thanks for any info.

I don't know what the pay is like in Philadelphia, but I work in a very upscale neighborhood vet clinic in Michigan and barely make $20k. I'm not licensed but I might make $5-10k more if I was. It also depends on where you work, some emergencies or specialist techs make a little bit more, or even the "chain" vets like VCA might pay more. I work at a poorly managed, always understaffed private practice. It's a lot of hard work, very little respect and not enough pay in my opinion.

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Cathy in Kennesaw, Georgia

38 months ago

I'm wondering if age (40s) is a major consideration for employing people once they have vet tech certification. I have experience working in vet clinics and kennels, and have volunteered with my local humane society and nearest zoo. I would love to work with animals again but get paid more of a living wage. If I got the two year degree and certification, what would the typical salary be going out? I would be willing to relocate.

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Dog Girl in Austin, Texas

34 months ago

Brooke in Manchester, Tennessee said: I am 21 years old. I have just finished up my general studies & I am deciding on either going to a 2 year program to become a vet tech or going to a university & going into the medical field or teaching field.
I have a huge passion for animals & I have always wanted a job working with animals since I was little. I can't afford Veterinarian school, it's impossible. I have done some research & seen that vet tech's only make about 20k-30k a year, thats pretty much nothing.. especially now in today's economy.
I don't have any interest in medicine or medical stuff dealing with people, but I'm afraid thats what I may need/have to do to make a decent living & get a secure job.
What are you guys thoughts about it? Should you go to school for something you love and worry about money the rest of your life? Or get a job you don't enjoy but never have to worry about financial problems?
I'm pretty torn between the two & I have to decide pretty soon.
I've also heard people leave the vet tech field 7-10 years into it.. so I don't want to end up hating that career either after 7 years and have to go back to school at 30!
So, please someone give me some good advice! People keep telling me to do what I love, but it's hard to believe them when they are going to school or went to school just to get a job making a lot of money?

I would go with your passion! Always! I am having the same delimmea sp. right now, only its flipped around! I choose a degree in the medical field, chasing the dream of money and stability... Now I am in my thirties chasing my true dream and passion of working with animals! I realize I will not make as much money but at the end of the work day, when I am fullfilled, satisfied and HAPPY at my job I realize thats more important than any amount of money! : ) I hoped this helped!

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brittdavis in Thayne, Wyoming

34 months ago

isabella in Buffalo, Minnesota said: I am in school online for a vet technician it is 100% online except for I still need my clinicals but I love animals

Isabella, where are you going to school at?

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eagertofly in Belfast, United Kingdom

34 months ago

The one clue I would give anyone thinking of going in to this business. Are you an animal person through and through? Are you prepared for the good and the bad? Also frankly what is your background with animals? Employers want to know what is your practical skills with animals? The books teach certain things but in this business it is hands on practical skills that count and matter and oh yes also must have people skills along with animal skills. Are you prepared to get messy? Are you prepared to see animals put down because frankly the owner cant afford to pay for an operation? Are you prepared for the negatives as well as the positives? Their are tons of positives but then their is the other side.

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laurarvt in Cincinnati, Ohio

32 months ago

I just wanted to say that I graduated from Vet Tech Institute and it may depend on the location, but I actually feel like I got a lot out of my degree. Yes, it was fast paced and a lot of material being thrown at you at once. Although I don't regret going there other than the fact it was 30K, but it was the only school in my area with the next closest being Purdue University which was 2.5 hours away. Although I will say that probably less than 25% of my class passed their boards, but I just think they were too immature and thought they were going to go in and pass with flying colors without studying at all. I studied my ass off for the VTNE (3-4 months in advance), so I guess it just depends on how motivated you are and use class time and your notes to learn everything you possibly can, or to just skate by.

I feel that Brown Mackie is one of the worst colleges ever. We had a new technician come in (that hadn't even sat for her boards yet and wasn't taking that seriously) and she didn't even know how to read a PCV. She was completely clueless. She was also a new technician that came in acting like she knew everything and tried to tell our head technician of over 35 years how to do a dental. She was gone after about 2 months. Not to mention the fact that all she did was stand around and talk.

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VennaUmanea in Brooklyn, New York

27 months ago

I really feel that this is out of place but I am at a point where I need some expert advice. My name is Vanessa Dey and I am a senior in High school of the graduating class of 2014. I know this is late but I seem to be the only one who is struggling with her college choice. I've grown up in a pretty unreliable neighborhood where every adult is some type of immigrant who knows nothing proper about the college admission and various degrees. I too aspire to become a Veterinarian and I have been stuck with my own will power to find a way to get there. At first I thought the best course of action would be to pursue a bachelors degree in Veterinary Medicine so I can go through the years faster and get to Vet School. However that seemed to fall apart when I felt I wasn't smart enough for the SAT's exam, messed up and scored a 1520 (my personal yet terrible best) and I knew I wouldn't be able to get into Cornell, which I was hoping to apply to. I wanted to save myself the embarrassment so I applied to a school called Frostburg State University. It's in Maryland and they carried the Vet Medicine degree. I was happy at first as I was accepted, but the distance threw my parents and guidance counselor off, so I reluctantly gave it up.
I got terrible luck trying to find a close school here in New York that also carries the Veterinary Medicine degree but NO ONE else had it. For being a big and popular state, I was surprised New York lacked such colleges besides Cornell. So I downgraded my degree into a Veterinary Technician degree. I felt that if I worked my way up, the extra experience would benefit me greatly for Vet school. So I now aim for a bachelor's in Vet Tech but I feel this is also a dead end. I want to avoid any arguments with my parents especially my highly conservative mother so I'm sticking to schools only in New York or the farthest, Pennsylvania . I applied to two SUNYs Delhi and Canton, and 6 CUNYs.

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VennaUmanea in Brooklyn, New York

27 months ago

Delhi and Canton both have Vet Tech degrees but the latter carries the bachelor I was striving for. Delhi has an Associates and from reading the past comments I am now finding out that any level of degree is acceptable and doesn't matter. Which is driving me nuts as I feel like a lost cause. I thought Canton was perfect but it's a 6 hour drive from where I live and my mom is absolutely against sending me because of that 6 hour drive..She is a major obstcale that I don't know how to overcome and I feel she is holding me back. My counselor is of no help in this matter and knows nothing. Another good thing with Canton is that my financial aid is covering all of my tuition, but I have $20,500 in loans compared to a $22,574 tuition at that school. Delhi hasn't offered me financial aid that covers all my tuition. The CUNYs are of no help either because none carry the specific Vet Tech or Vet Med degree. The closest is biology and I feel if I take biology, it will hold me back even further.
In the end everyone, I simply want to get away from home and my family so I can start my life over, yet I want to be satisfied at the school I attend and the degree I am studying for. I am torn as to where to make my deposit as I want to live on campus,and as to what degree should I aim for. No one is helping me and I feel so lost. In my honest opinion, 6 hours isn't that long and far and I feel it would be worth my career. But my mother fails to understand and I am tired of arguing with him. Any help at all would be great. I never knew applying to colleges was so difficult. I also never knew how rare this major was. Please and Thank You.

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

27 months ago

Your mother is right, you should stick with the closer school for your associates degree so that you don't run up a huge college tuition debt. Then if you decide to go on and earn a bachelors degree you can apply to Delhi or any of a number of bachelors in veterinary technology programs that are available, including through distance education.

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poodleman, LVT in Houston, Texas

21 months ago

SarahRVT in Kansas City, Missouri said: Cindy, I am a graduate of Vet tech Institute in Houston. I also graduated with Honors. I am now a lead technician at my Clinic. When you go tour the school they tell you this is an ACCELERATED program. It is not for everybody. People go in there thinking they can fly through the program with no problem and those are the people who whine and complain. If you want to get working quickly and are not scared of hard work then by all means check out Vet Tech Institute.

I am a graduate of VTI in Houston as well. And i received an awesome education at VTI i passed the VTNE on my first attempt. I received a very high paying job in a specialty clinic shortly after graduation. I work with lone star college graduates and the fact of the matter is they are always knowledgeable about theory and concepts however their hands on skill level is always severely lacking fresh out of school and it always surprises us that while they can pass test and recite theory they cant place catheters or draw blood or suture to save their lives.They get the hang of it and excel but the vti graduates always have a better skill set fresh out of school. also with any program it is up to you to make sure you learn all the skills required

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vettechmom in Rockland County, New York

20 months ago

"Delhi and Canton both have Vet Tech degrees but the latter carries the bachelor I was striving for. Delhi has an Associates and from reading the past comments I am now finding out that any level of degree is acceptable and doesn't matter. Which is driving me nuts as I feel like a lost cause. I thought Canton was perfect but it's a 6 hour drive from where I live and my mom is absolutely against sending me because of that 6 hour drive."

Venna, if you haven't decided yet. I can say I know how you feel. My son is now a senior and he's applying to Canton and Delhi. He thought Canton was not a place for him; he didn't see himself fitting in there and thought Delhi offered much more hands on than Canton, despite what the tour guide said. I didn't mind the 6 hour drive, the Adirondacks are beautiful and being 20 minutes from Canada seemed a plus. We also really want him to do the Vet Tech in FOUR years instead of TWO because we're concerned that it'll be too intense to do it in 2. His counselor just suggested Mercy, which is 4 years but somebody commented here that it's mostly book learning not hands on. Still, that's an option you didn't mention.
Having said that, if you haven't decided and you want somebody to point you in the right direction, I actually found the admissions counselors at both Delhi and Canton to have an excellent grasp of the situation. At Canton, the counselor was even able to give us pros and cons to the two colleges' programs. I know their job is to sell their program, but at least you're getting somebody who really knows what they are talking about; also try the department heads at each school. We found a teacher at Delhi who had gone to Canton, and he was also helpful. So, going to the source may be the way to go. You should be able to find email addresses online. When we toured, we got business cards.
Please let me know what you decided to do. It may help me in helping my son decide!

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drc0871 in Houston, Texas

15 months ago

poodleman, LVT in Houston, Texas said: I am a graduate of VTI in Houston as well. And i received an awesome education at VTI i passed the VTNE on my first attempt. I received a very high paying job in a specialty clinic shortly after graduation. I work with lone star college graduates and the fact of the matter is they are always knowledgeable about theory and concepts however their hands on skill level is always severely lacking fresh out of school and it always surprises us that while they can pass test and recite theory they cant place catheters or draw blood or suture to save their lives.They get the hang of it and excel but the vti graduates always have a better skill set fresh out of school. also with any program it is up to you to make sure you learn all the skills required

Hey poodleman!
Im in houston too! I have been debating if I should A0 go into being a vet tech in houston and B0 which school?When you applied for a job did they care WHICH college you went to? Is the pay decent in houston?Does it depend on WHERE in houston or which field?
Im 43 yrs old,would it be wise for me to get into this field??HELP!!!! lol

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drc0871 in Houston, Texas

15 months ago

Also,I was thinking of pursuing getting my bachelors in vet technology,is it worth it or if I went to Vet Tech institute,is it transferable?

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Sylvia in Waco, Texas

14 months ago

isabella in Buffalo, Minnesota said: I am in school online for a vet technician it is 100% online except for I still need my clinicals but I love animals

How are you doing your vet tech degree all online?

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

14 months ago

drc0871, you have to decide if a bachelors degree is worth it. Certainly it opens up new opportunities for veterinary technicians. There are positions available to techs with a BS that aren't open to a tech with an AS. Get your hands on a copy of Career Choices for Veterinary Technicians, or talk to some of the veterinary technicians in the Houston area that have a BS. As for your credits transferring, you will need to contact the schools you are interested in and ask them directly. Each school has it's own requirements.

Sylvia, veterinary technology programs that are AVMA accredited aren't "all online". Coursework is done online, but students who complete these distance education programs are required to have the same minimum of 240 hours of hands-on training in a veterinary facility as students in on-site programs. Students who are enrolling in distance education programs should build a relationship with local DVMs and look to get hired on as an assistant. Veterinarians or credentialed technicians who are going to serve as mentors/preceptors for students in distance-ed programs have to devote a good bit of time to training so having a relationship with them beforehand helps find one willing to take on the role. For more information on distance education programs, check out the information on the AVMA website. www.avma.org/ProfessionalDevelopment/Education/Accreditation/Programs/Pages/vettech_distance_learning.aspx
www.avma.org/ProfessionalDevelopment/Education/Accreditation/Programs/Pages/cvtea-pp.aspx

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Lost in Houston, Texas

11 months ago

poodleman, LVT in Houston, Texas said: I am a graduate of VTI in Houston as well. And i received an awesome education at VTI i passed the VTNE on my first attempt. I received a very high paying job in a specialty clinic shortly after graduation. I work with lone star college graduates and the fact of the matter is they are always knowledgeable about theory and concepts however their hands on skill level is always severely lacking fresh out of school and it always surprises us that while they can pass test and recite theory they cant place catheters or draw blood or suture to save their lives.They get the hang of it and excel but the vti graduates always have a better skill set fresh out of school. also with any program it is up to you to make sure you learn all the skills required

I am very excited to start a career in Veterinary Tech. and I also live in Houston. I am not too worried about my income as a vet tech because I simply just wanna love what I do and learn as much as possible about the field. However I want to know if the VTI is successful in helping you find a job after you finish the courses?

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Maria in Demarest, New Jersey

11 months ago

I'm going back to bergen community college to be a vet tech but I wasn't sure how good their program is and I don't know any other schools nearby that have a vet tech program that isn't very costly. Does anyone have any recommendations?

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

11 months ago

Maria,
Your best bet for getting informed opinions on a school in your state is to contact your state veterinary technician association. They are going to know people who attended the program or have heard about the quality of students that are being turned out by a program.

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vetteching in Tampa, Florida

11 months ago

Cindy you've been an avid poster and advocate on here for several years which I've had the pleasure of reading also. I'm interested in going to school for veterinary technology. I'm also a late bloomer in my late 20s. I got exposure to the field in my teens by volunteering in a local vet hospital, and while some of the workers weren't very supportive and nice, some of them were also very encouraging, especially the hospital administrator. As I've learned then and now, there's also a bachelor's in veterinary technology. But there's also states that don't require a license unfortunately to those who practice, which means it seems like anyone off the street can get trained on the job for and with a few years experience, can make the same as someone who graduated from a program. But also, there's also open opportunities to be a kennel manager, office manager or even a hospital admin. I talked with one when I was in my teens, and I remember her mentioning she was an admin for several local hospitals, within the same organization.

Pay isn't really my concern, but I'd at least be able to want to rent a decent apartment or house. There's also night shifts and specialties I understand that one can specialize in...after a few years of experience? I believe also the knowledge and information gained from school, even if I work a little bit in the field, can be applied to other areas in my life. Maybe such as to know what to do with a stray dog at my door, or an injured animal at the side of the road, etc. Plus, I've also been interested in starting a pet sitting business, which is a very competitive business, but I think having vet tech knowledge also helps with that.

I could also go towards therapy or nursing in human medicine, but vet tech an animals have stuck with me since my teens. The only things have set me back are several, including putting down animals that don't deserve to be put down and can be adopted out to other homes, politics in veterinary practices, etc.

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

11 months ago

I have found (working in a state that didn't require credentialing for 20 years) that even with experience the people who didn't have an education and weren't credentialed typically don't make as much as a credentialed/educated technician. That isn't the case 100% of the time, but in general it is. Even in states that don't require credentialing, there may still be requirements for more supervision and fewer allowable tasks for those who aren't credentialed and that certainly plays into the difference in pay.

Yes, there are specialties for veterinary technicians. You must be credentialed in order to apply for specialty credentialing and it takes several years of experience to complete the required number of cases in the specialty area before you can sit for the final exam. You can find more information about the specialties and links to the websites for each one here: www.navta.net/?page=specialties

What you learn in a veterinary technology program can certainly be applied for businesses that involve animal care. You would just have to be careful that what you do doesn't cross the line into diagnosing or prescribing treatment. Certainly the fact that you have training in veterinary nursing can be used to your advantage too in advertising for a pet sitting position. Owners are more likely to trust you to care for their animals because you have an education in animal health care and also they are more likely to hire you if they have animals that need special care such as medicating or monitoring due to a pre-existing medical condition.

There are indeed bachelors degree programs in veterinary technology. They tend to be 2+2 programs where a university offers 2 years of education that stacks on top of an associates degree in veterinary technology. If you plan on earning a BS, you need to attend a state-funded school for your AS instead of a for-profit school because many times credits from for-profit schools will not transfer.

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

11 months ago

(continuing)
If you are particularly interested in a for-profit program for your AS but also plan to continue on to earn a BS, you should contact the university offering the BS and ask if they accept credits from the for-profit school you are interested in attending. Doing this before you even start at the for-profit school can save you time and money if the credits won't transfer. Earning a BS in veterinary technology will qualify you for more diversified positions than just working in a veterinary practice. Veterinary related companies such as drug companies, pet food companies, etc often hire veterinary technicians with a BS to serve in research or as representatives for the company to veterinary practices. You can also apply for government jobs related animal and human health, research positions, teaching positions, etc if you have a BS in veterinary technology.

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vetteching in Tampa, Florida

11 months ago

Thank you very much for the helpful information. There's actually a college nearby, SPC, that offers an AS degree and then it transfers to a BS degree in veterinary technology. So that's a good go there. It could also be costly. I'm not sure there's much of a pay increase, but with a higher degree could potentially be more opportunities. As I'm sure those with an AS degree after some years of experience can go onto become managers of the office, kennel within the hospital. I mentioned also knowing a practice administrator where she was the admin for several hospitals throughout the area in that organization, she'd also travel for conferences, overseeing practice management, etc. I believe she was also a vet tech but took on a more admin role. That's something that could be look into doing.

Pet sitting could be done on the side and working part-time as a vet tech. As I also find wanting to advance more into the field I may not have time for pet sitting as well. But both could work very well together and in demand.

As I've learned and many in the industry know, we do the work for the animals. I've heard many times before and know that it could be hard to make a living. Wages here I don't think have gone up any since I've known probably 10 years is about almost the same. But also working nights and holidays I'm sure there's pay differentials and also as you mentioned getting a specialty certification. I'd love to work with avian and exotic animals. The only things I could really think that would be very hard would be dealing with the pain, etc., that comes from the animals and having some of my own. Another specialty I'd be interested in is dental. There are a lot of specialties actually.

Saturation is also another issue that has come up in the passed few years, where sometimes it's hard for graduates to find positions. Likewise it could also be a little easier already working in a vet hospital as an assistant to the vet or in the kennel as a way to network.

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Kara in Mountain View, California

10 months ago

isabella in Buffalo, Minnesota said: I am in school online for a vet technician it is 100% online except for I still need my clinicals but I love animals

What online school?

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

9 months ago

Kara,
That is the way the distance education programs that are AVMA accredited work. You do coursework through online classes and then you have to have a minimum of 240 hours of clinical experience and document your skills for your instructors to verify in order to complete the programs.

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Kara in Mountain View, California

9 months ago

Thank

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Alia in Valley View, Texas

9 months ago

I am currently a senior in HS and I want to be a vet tech. I start volunteering at a vet clinic in 2 days. I'm also taking the Biology for Science Majors/Biology Laboratory Science (dual credit course.)
I guess my question is-- what are the best vet tech colleges to apply to that have a good acceptance rate and have a pretty good job placement? I was looking at Lonestar after reading this thread. Are there any other good programs out of state? I'm also hoping to keep my student debt as low as possible.
I'm just looking for maybe 5-7 schools so I can narrow it down from there.

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

9 months ago

Hi Alia,
Lonestar is a good school and certainly one I would recommend. If you go looking for out-of-state schools, you would either need to relocate or attend a distance education program. Distance-education programs are going to be less helpful with job placement as they can't have the connections in all areas of the country that local schools do. If you are willing to relocate, I would recommend relocating within the state so that you still get in-state tuition. There are several community colleges in Texas that offer veterinary technology degree programs such as Cedar Valley College in Lancaster, Blinn near College Station, McClennan in Waco, and Palo Alto in San Antonio

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VetTech2018

7 months ago

I am going to Vet Tech Institute in Pittsburgh and I am so excited! But I am very worried that I wont be able to put the animals down. I understand that this is part of the job. Does anybody have any pointers or experiences they can share?

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oceansidevettech in Montrose, Colorado

6 months ago

I hate to butt into the conversation but might as well. I'm fairly new to the field (started doing kennels, worked my way up, yada yada). Things were going well until I ended up with a technician that didn't want to train anyone to "replace" her, so guess who got very little training. I couldn't train myself; I was too busy keeping myself from committing suicide (almost literally). I was bullied relentlessly, ended up with an eating disorder, didn't eat for several weeks. Later, I went to another vet hospital who had their own substrata of issues, I suppose like any other practice. Well, I got really good training... for 3 times a week for 4 months only for it to come to a screeching halt because my boss became too frustrated and too busy to continue training. Here I am 10 weeks away from graduating from Penn Foster (only have a clinical to do) and no one will take me on. I have lots of post- graduate offers, but no one's willing to put the time into training me, and it's proven that I cannot teach myself something that I know nothing about. My current (I think current) boss laid me off because she rehired the person I replaced. So not only am I out a job, I'm out my clinical as well. So now I have to find a new site. I'm going to have to travel over 240 miles, eight different doctors, nine different practices to train. Each practice can't do all of it, but will help a very small amount. I don't know what else to do. Ridiculous if you ask me. But I'll be better equipped to handle things earlier in life- you name it, I've dealt with it. Any advice?

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Jessica in Lake Worth, Florida

3 months ago

Hello there!
I have read every post on here from over 2 years ago because I would also like to get advice on this particular field. I am currently a full time teacher making $35,000/year. I've never liked my position. Ever. I do however like the benefits, time off and summers. I started volunteering at a local animal rescue helping in the clinic to see if this was a path I would like to follow. I applied for an online AS degree through St. Petersburg College and I would start in August. I also was able to get a job within a animal hospital so that I could get experience during summer as well as earn money during school. I never realized just hos little the pay was. The doctor is telling me I would be making $10-$12/hr and there's no benefits other than they would reimburse me $100/month towards my insurance I choose.
My biggest fear in all of this is that I will leave a career to head into another direction and end up not liking it or possibly have no ladder to climb up. I'm very motivated and would love to work in surgeries and honestly rehab, which I know is something very new. I'm very new to the career so I'm not sure what the stepping stones are. I also don't want to make it 6 years before anything happens and end up thinking I should have gone to school to be a vet in the end.
If there is any direction someone could give me, it would greatly be appreciated!

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meghanlit in Pennsylvania

3 months ago

I am currently going to the vet tech institute in PA. As for the insurance it just varies from state to state but most of them offer it. As for the pay if you go to school and specialize in something you could be making up to 20$ if you get into this business you do it for the animals not for the pay. It is very disappointing about what we will get paid. But having a degree in this will definitely increase the pay. Look into the Vet Tech Institute.

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melbee in Arcata, California

2 months ago

I am just begining to look into Vet Tech schools. I am in Arcata CA. Any advice would be much appreciated! I was considering just doing the assistant thing before fully committing to a vet tech and was looking at animal behavior college but it seems from prior comments this may be a scam? They do give you hands on experience for 90 days and the program only takes a year, anyone know anything about them? I am also looking at Penn Foster, any pros or cons to either? Thanks!

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oceansidevettech in Grand Junction, Colorado

2 months ago

melbee in Arcata, California said: I am just begining to look into Vet Tech schools. I am in Arcata CA. Any advice would be much appreciated! I was considering just doing the assistant thing before fully committing to a vet tech and was looking at animal behavior college but it seems from prior comments this may be a scam? They do give you hands on experience for 90 days and the program only takes a year, anyone know anything about them? I am also looking at Penn Foster, any pros or cons to either? Thanks!

I am one assignment away from graduating Penn Foster, and I nearly jumped off a cliff because online school is difficult on top of working at a clinic. Don't even bother registering with Penn Foster until you find a large animal clinic who will mentor you during your 4th semester and you find a clinic who uses film based x-rays and will let you do your assignments there. Many people have gotten so far only to be stopped at that point because they didn't find those things, and they end up having to quit because what other choice is there? It's very challenging material but even more so when you work at a vet clinic because they want you to learn what they want you learn. So you'll be learning at a parasite while you're learning about the x-ray machine. So you're learning a lot in a small space of time. And doctors do not have time to stop and help you if you're having trouble with school. There's no one there to show you how to do these math problems. So there are many different obstacles to overcome going to a completely online school like that. But if you can do it, do it.

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HorseLover321 in Dorr, Michigan

2 months ago

I have been wondering if vet tech and nursing makes you have to get multiple education years to do them. Also I was curious on why most/all colleges have pre- vet. Would it be better to be something totally different than the medical field?

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cindyrvt in Henderson, Texas

1 month ago

I'm not exactly sure what you are asking, but I'll try to help. Accredited veterinary technology programs require a minimum of 18 months to complete (those are typically the for-profit programs) though most are 2 year programs. These are the program you would complete to be able to become a credentialed veterinary technician. For human nursing, the minimum education is 2 years long as well though there are longer programs for nursing.

Pre-vet programs are a collection of courses that meet the requirements for application to most vet schools. They don't prepare you for any particular career, just to be able to apply to vet school. Colleges offer them to meet the needs of students hoping to apply to vet school after completing 4 years of undergraduate work.

As for what you should do, that is completely up to you and dependent on your personality and abilities. You would be better off to look into different careers with your family and a guidance counselor and then talk to people in the careers you are interested in to see what the work is really like.

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Barb24 in Wheaton, Illinois

3 days ago

You can get started in the veterinary industry by training to be a veterinary assistant first. This is a great way to get your foot in the door.
Career Step has been training quality healthcare professionals for over 20 years:

referral.careerstep.com/va?ref=36530

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