Does this career cycle with the economy?

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Comments (9)

Dan Underhill in Portland, Oregon

57 months ago

I'm working on my pre-requisites now to apply for entry into the Radiography program here. I have a full year of pre-reqs to finish before even applying and only 30 in 250 of those get in. But if I get in, it's another 2 years of school and then another year or more to get my MRI and CT training. In that time it will be almost 4 years from now.

Now if you read the posts here, it would seem that the prospects for finding a Rad job is almost a near impossibility with only a slightly higher chance of winning the lottery. But of course the majority of people who are gainfully employed in this field are rare to post here and so the viewpoint we tend to read is heavily weighted towards a negative outlook.

But I've been reading in different places that the growth outlook for Rad is expected to rise significantly by the next 3-4 years. So when people are saying here, "Don't go into Rad, there are no jobs!" Well, there may be no jobs NOW, but most people going into studying Rad probably have at least 2-4 years in school before they enter the job pool. So, any opinions about this field forward looking into 4 years from now. That's the important question I think. Has anyone experienced that this field gyrates with economic cycles and therefore will rebound most likely?

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Joe R jr in Kansas City, Missouri

57 months ago

The real questions is not whether the field will rebound but whether the number of programs and graduates mushroomed when the field was hot and whether a rebound will be able to accommodate this. Does anyone have the stats for say 2007, 2008, 2009, certification numbers for radiologic technologists compared to several years before that? I would be interested in seeing that trend.

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Joe R jr in Kansas City, Missouri

57 months ago

Radiography has been
virtually flat for two years, with 0.5% increases in candidate numbers.
Radiation Therapy volume, on the heels of a 5.3% drop in 2007
volume, dropped 1.9% in 2008.
”ARRT examination volume closely follows the number of program
graduates, and the number of graduates goes through cycles driven
by supply and demand for technologists,” notes Jerry B. Reid, Ph.D.,
ARRT executive director. “When there are more positions available
than there are technologists to fill them, educational programs
increase enrollment. We typically overshoot the mark — to the point
where there are more technologists than there are positions, and the
programs reduce enrollments. These cycles have been observed for
decades, but the overall trend across the years is increased volume.”
The figures are from ARRT’s 2008 Annual Report of Examinations,
which is available at www.arrt.org under “Examinations,” along
with a more detailed Technical Appendix. In addition to reporting
volume, ARRT’s Annual Report of Examinations also reports scores
— by exam section, percentile rank, and comparative means for
educational programs; as well as by state.

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Christina in Wake Forest, North Carolina

56 months ago

I wouldn't waste my time going through x-ray school. I went through x-ray, couldnt find a job. So just finished CT, couldn't find a job. So now I'm going for MRI. I'm tired of school and there are NO jobs without moving and thats not an option for me.

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Ex Mobile X-ray Tech in Charlottesville, Virginia

44 months ago

In those same 4 years you could be an Occupational Therapist or Physical Therapist. I would seriously look at these venues before Radiography. The X-Ray schools still continue to graduate at near capacity, it's all about money. Eduacation is indeed a commodity.

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Ex Mobile X-ray Tech in Charlottesville, Virginia

44 months ago

486In those same 4 years you could be an Occupational Therapist or Physical Therapist. I would seriously look at these venues before Radiography. The X-Ray schools still continue to graduate at near capacity, it's all about money. Eduacation is indeed a commodity.

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Drones in Omaha, Nebraska

40 months ago

Joe R jr in Kansas City, Missouri said: Radiography has been
virtually flat for two years, with 0.5% increases in candidate numbers.
Radiation Therapy volume, on the heels of a 5.3% drop in 2007
volume, dropped 1.9% in 2008.
”ARRT examination volume closely follows the number of program
graduates, and the number of graduates goes through cycles driven
by supply and demand for technologists,” notes Jerry B. Reid, Ph.D.,
ARRT executive director. “When there are more positions available
than there are technologists to fill them, educational programs
increase enrollment. We typically overshoot the mark — to the point
where there are more technologists than there are positions, and the
programs reduce enrollments. These cycles have been observed for
decades, but the overall trend across the years is increased volume.”
The figures are from ARRT’s 2008 Annual Report of Examinations,
which is available at www.arrt.org under “Examinations,” along
with a more detailed Technical Appendix. In addition to reporting
volume, ARRT’s Annual Report of Examinations also reports scores
— by exam section, percentile rank, and comparative means for
educational programs; as well as by state.

This is nothing but pure propaganda and political spin by the ARRT. Don't believe the lies. Do a job search in your area and see what jobs are available and if you find one available ask the HR person how many people have applied for that job. Don't waste your time getting into x-ray. The market is completely flooded and there are no signs of decline for at least 5yrs. The economy is making things even harder because techs are holding onto their jobs past retirement while hospitals lay off staff due to budget cuts.

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Drones in Omaha, Nebraska

39 months ago

The field will not likely rebound for at least 5-10yrs. Even when it does rebound there will still be a lot of stiff competition due to the high number of current out of work technologists.

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DRONES in Omaha, Nebraska

38 months ago

Joe R jr in Kansas City, Missouri said: The real questions is not whether the field will rebound but whether the number of programs and graduates mushroomed when the field was hot and whether a rebound will be able to accommodate this. Does anyone have the stats for say 2007, 2008, 2009, certification numbers for radiologic technologists compared to several years before that? I would be interested in seeing that trend.

I checked the STATS at ARRT, and from 2001 to 2010 there has been an 80% increase in the number of 1st time examanees. In 2001 there were approximately 10K first time examanees and last year, 2010, there were almost 18K first time examanees.

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