English major who dreams of working at publishing company

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Carolyn Henry in Humble, Texas

87 months ago

I moved to Houston last month and am having a hard time finding any employment. I have a degree in English and was a middle school teacher for a couple years. With that said, I have decided to move far far away from the education field and would like to realize my dreams of working at a major publishing company (or any publishing company for that matter). I have even worked as a staffwriter for a small newspaper, but there seems to be nothing past freelancing available and I need something with more stability. I love reading, writing, editing and doing research and and am highly experienced in all of those areas.

Does anyone out there have any leads or tips that could help me? I was told that having a degree in English prepares you for any job.......too bad employers don't see it that way :(

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KidTruth in Humble, Texas

85 months ago

Carolyn Henry in Humble, Texas said: I moved to Houston last month and am having a hard time finding any employment. I have a degree in English and was a middle school teacher for a couple years. With that said, I have decided to move far far away from the education field and would like to realize my dreams of working at a major publishing company (or any publishing company for that matter). ...(

I feel your pain. I'm an English major too, moved to the Houston area, don't know anyone really. I ended up delivering pizza for about a year after I graduated, and I even have a novel out in the UK (Jimwamba.) I ended up taking some dumpy paralegal course, and now I have a pretty decent job working at an intellectual property law firm downtown. I actually make considerably less than a teacher makes, but that's mainly due to lack of experience.

If you take a paralegal course online or show you have some basic understanding of the law, you can work your way up from legal assistant to... paralegal I guess.

Alright, that's pretty depressing too.

Here's to hoping my agent gets my new book published.

Basically, not saying I have any real leads for you, but I sympathize.

Being an intellectual property paralegal can be fairly fun, but is usually very mundane (filing papers, mailing letters.) However, as 95% of intellectual property attorneys are engineers, I also edit just about every document in the firm for content. They are generally very excited to have an english major around, and that's what attracted them to my resume.

As for the best place to find jobs, I recommend craigslist. Even major law firms have hip human resource college grads that will make posts on craigslist, because they used it to get that first fouton.

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Ruth in Houston, Texas

84 months ago

You should try going to an agency like Ad Hoc the Legal Placement Company www.ahlr.com/Career_Opportunities/

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rosic

82 months ago

Hello Carolyn:
Since I plan to move to Houston after New Year's, I just had to write to you to offer help. Try doing lots of Internet research. Many times, one website will lead to two or three more job related websites. Think of all the media giants and then sit down and go to their websites. Chances are you will find a place on the site that says: career opportunities/employment. Telephone directory is great source, too.
Job hunting can be discouraging. I too have had disappointments lately, especially after renting a car and driving from Dallas for interviews in Houston. Then not getting the job I drove there to interview for. But I too plan to move to Houston now and then look for a job. It's just too hard to look from so far away. Good Luck To You!
Best regards
RosiC

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Kid Truth in Houston, Texas

82 months ago

Agree completely with the above poster, particularly about language. The engineers I work with that are lawyer's second tend to appreciate my editing skills, but those who are litigators and trial lawyers (non-intellectual property lawyers) do tend to write with an awful lot of words and not much to say.

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MAR in Houston, Texas

68 months ago

The following is supposed to be a good source of suggestions. Hope it helps:

I'm an English Major Now What? by Timothy Lemire (Paperback - April 3, 2006)

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Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida

68 months ago

I just read Kid Truth's comments - all of them. In a nice tone, I did not find them to be reliable.

As Displaced said, if you're REALLY SERIOUS about paralegal, then go to an ABA approved program. I would suggest you get a job as a legal secretary to get you started.

[Being an intellectual property paralegal can be fairly fun, but is usually very mundane (filing papers, mailing letters.) However, as 95% of intellectual property attorneys are engineers, I also edit just about every document in the firm for content. They are generally very excited to have an english major around, and that's what attracted them to my resume.] -

- Wow, that's interesting. Enough said there. Those statements seem incredibly unreliable and not truthful.

Myself, I was always referred to as the Queen of English, ended up helping everyone who couldn't proofread, edit or put together sentences.

At one time had to work for a new associates whose writing skills were so bad, part of my job was to edit and clean up his documents. He had such a big ego he did not appreciate it. He did everything he could to destroy me.

Hardly any attorney appreciates having his/her grammar, sentences, or documents edited by someone else. They get angry even when a higher up attorney does it.

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KidTruth in Humble, Texas

68 months ago

Yes, your anecdotal story is much much better than my anecdotal story - I was just letting you know how things worked out for me in particular.

-Kid Truth

Mary inTampa in Tampa, Florida said: I just read Kid Truth's comments - all of them. In a nice tone, I did not find them to be reliable.

As Displaced said, if you're REALLY SERIOUS about paralegal, then go to an ABA approved program. I would suggest you get a job as a legal secretary to get you started.

[Being an intellectual property paralegal can be fairly fun, but is usually very mundane (filing papers, mailing letters.) However, as 95% of intellectual property attorneys are engineers, I also edit just about every document in the firm for content. They are generally very excited to have an english major around, and that's what attracted them to my resume.] -

- Wow, that's interesting. Enough said there. Those statements seem incredibly unreliable and not truthful.

Myself, I was always referred to as the Queen of English, ended up helping everyone who couldn't proofread, edit or put together sentences.

At one time had to work for a new associates whose writing skills were so bad, part of my job was to edit and clean up his documents. He had such a big ego he did not appreciate it. He did everything he could to destroy me.

Hardly any attorney appreciates having his/her grammar, sentences, or documents edited by someone else. They get angry even when a higher up attorney does it.

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