Mechanisms of Mammalian Epigenome Reprogramming
National Institutes of Health - Bethesda, MD

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National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

A postdoctoral position is available to study mechanisms of epigenome reprogramming in mammals at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. The Section on Mammalian Epigenome Reprogramming headed by Todd Macfarlan was established under the Earl Stadtman investigator program, designed to facilitate high risk-high impact science ( http://irp.nih.gov/careers/careers-in-action/science-the-stadtman-way ). The laboratory uses a multi-disciplinary approach combining molecular, biochemical, genetic, and cellular techniques to understand how epigenomes are modified during mouse development, with particular emphasis on the pre-implantation period and during development of the central nervous system. Current projects include exploring the context-dependent function of histone modifying enzymes during development and during differentiation of stem cells, studying the interplay of transcription factors and chromatin modifying enzymes during artificial reprogramming, and exploring the impact of endogenous retroviruses and their remnants on host genomes. Candidates will have access to multi-dimensional imaging core facilities, substantial mouse colony space, ample support for next generation sequencing applications (ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, etc.), and outstanding stipend support.

Requirements:
Interested candidates must have a Ph.D. or M.D. within the past five years in molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, or a related field. Experience with mouse genetics, mouse development, ES/iPS cell culture, and/or next generation sequencing approaches is a plus.

To Apply:
Send a cover letter with desired start date, a CV with bibliography, a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references with contact information (including phone numbers) to todd.macfarlan@nih.gov.

For more information on the Macfarlan lab, please visit http://macfarlan.nichd.nih.gov . Also see Genes Dev 2011, Mar 15;25(6): 594-607 and Nature (13 June 2012) | doi: 10.1038/nature11244.

The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.
Mechanisms of Mammalian Epigenome Reprogramming
National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

A postdoctoral position is available to study mechanisms of epigenome reprogramming in mammals at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. The Section on Mammalian Epigenome Reprogramming headed by Todd Macfarlan was established under the Earl Stadtman investigator program, designed to facilitate high risk-high impact science ( http://irp.nih.gov/careers/careers-in-action/science-the-stadtman-way ). The laboratory uses a multi-disciplinary approach combining molecular, biochemical, genetic, and cellular techniques to understand how epigenomes are modified during mouse development, with particular emphasis on the pre-implantation period and during development of the central nervous system. Current projects include exploring the context-dependent function of histone modifying enzymes during development and during differentiation of stem cells, studying the interplay of transcription factors and chromatin modifying enzymes during artificial reprogramming, and exploring the impact of endogenous retroviruses and their remnants on host genomes. Candidates will have access to multi-dimensional imaging core facilities, substantial mouse colony space, ample support for next generation sequencing applications (ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, etc.), and outstanding stipend support.

Requirements:
Interested candidates must have a Ph.D. or M.D. within the past five years in molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, or a related field. Experience with mouse genetics, mouse development, ES/iPS cell culture, and/or next generation sequencing approaches is a plus.

To Apply:
Send a cover letter with desired start date, a CV with bibliography, a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references with contact information (including phone numbers) to todd.macfarlan@nih.gov.

For more information on the Macfarlan lab, please visit http://macfarlan.nichd.nih.gov . Also see Genes Dev 2011, Mar 15;25(6): 594-607 and Nature (13 June 2012) | doi: 10.1038/nature11244.

The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.

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