Receptors that Regulate the Immune Response
National Institutes of Health - Bethesda, MD

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

Our laboratory investigates multiple aspects of cell surface receptors that regulate immune function, from regulation of expression and signaling mechanisms to cellular dynamics and function. The current studies have evolved from an historical interest in receptors important for natural killer (NK) cell function. Our current research is focused in three related areas: 1) role of CD300 family receptors expressed largely by myeloid cells in regulating inflammation, especially through phagocytosis of apoptotic cells; 2) role of lytic granule proteins in regulating NK cell cytolytic activity; 3) function of the newly discovered IgM specific receptor FcμR, formerly known as Toso; 4) regulation of expression of the NK cell activating receptor CD16, low-affinity receptor for IgG, with hope of enhancing the immunotherapeutic value of NK cells.

For more information, see:
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/labsandresources/labs/aboutlabs/lig/receptorcellbiologysection/

Requirements:
Applicants must have a Ph.D. or MD and less than 5 years of postdoctoral experience. The Laboratory of Immunogenetics is located in an NIH satellite campus near the Twinbrook Metro Station in Rockville that houses about 30 senior investigators and several hundred research fellows.

To Apply:
Candidates should submit a CV, including contact information for three letters of reference, and a personal statement describing research accomplishments and plans to:

John E. Coligan, Ph.D.
Senior Investigator
Laboratory of Immunogenetics
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 496 8247 (office)
jcoligan@niaid.nih.gov
Receptors that Regulate the Immune Response
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

Our laboratory investigates multiple aspects of cell surface receptors that regulate immune function, from regulation of expression and signaling mechanisms to cellular dynamics and function. The current studies have evolved from an historical interest in receptors important for natural killer (NK) cell function. Our current research is focused in three related areas: 1) role of CD300 family receptors expressed largely by myeloid cells in regulating inflammation, especially through phagocytosis of apoptotic cells; 2) role of lytic granule proteins in regulating NK cell cytolytic activity; 3) function of the newly discovered IgM specific receptor FcμR, formerly known as Toso; 4) regulation of expression of the NK cell activating receptor CD16, low-affinity receptor for IgG, with hope of enhancing the immunotherapeutic value of NK cells.

For more information, see:
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/labsandresources/labs/aboutlabs/lig/receptorcellbiologysection/

Requirements:
Applicants must have a Ph.D. or MD and less than 5 years of postdoctoral experience. The Laboratory of Immunogenetics is located in an NIH satellite campus near the Twinbrook Metro Station in Rockville that houses about 30 senior investigators and several hundred research fellows.

To Apply:
Candidates should submit a CV, including contact information for three letters of reference, and a personal statement describing research accomplishments and plans to:

John E. Coligan, Ph.D.
Senior Investigator
Laboratory of Immunogenetics
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 496 8247 (office)
jcoligan@niaid.nih.gov

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