Innate Immune Responses to Rotavirus Infection
National Institutes of Health - Bethesda, MD

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

The goal of the Rotavirus Molecular Biology Section (RMBS) is to acquire knowledge about the molecular biology, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of RVs that can be applied to developing methods for controlling, preventing, and treating rotavirus disease. A postdoctoral position is currently available in the RMBS to perform research on the mechanisms used by rotavirus to subvert innate immune responses to viral infection. Multiple rotavirus proteins may play a role in antagonizing host responses but the principal effector appears to be NSP1, a viral nonstructural protein that induces the degradation of host transcription factors [interferon regulatory factors (IRF) proteins, and beta-TrCP] necessary for robust interferon expression. Current models suggest that NSP1 functions as a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase, an activity that allows the protein to cause the polyubiqutination and proteasome-mediated turnover of targeted host proteins. The topic was recently reviewed in the following publication: Arnold MM, Sen A, Greenberg HB, Patton JT. (2013) The battle between rotavirus and its host for control of the interferon signaling pathway. PLoS Path: 9e1003064.

Additional information on the RMBS is available at:
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/labsandresources/labs/aboutlabs/lid/rotavirus

Requirements:
The position is available immediately and requires an individual with strong written and verbal communications skills and an ability to work efficiently and independently. Qualified candidates will have a Ph.D. and/or M.D. in virology, immunology, molecular biology, or related field.

To Apply:
Candidates should submit a cover letter describing research interests, a curriculum vita, and the names of three references to:

Dr. John T. Patton
Laboratory of Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Building 50, Room 6308
Bethesda, MD 20892
E-mail: jpatton@niaid.nih.gov

The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.
Innate Immune Responses to Rotavirus Infection
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

The goal of the Rotavirus Molecular Biology Section (RMBS) is to acquire knowledge about the molecular biology, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of RVs that can be applied to developing methods for controlling, preventing, and treating rotavirus disease. A postdoctoral position is currently available in the RMBS to perform research on the mechanisms used by rotavirus to subvert innate immune responses to viral infection. Multiple rotavirus proteins may play a role in antagonizing host responses but the principal effector appears to be NSP1, a viral nonstructural protein that induces the degradation of host transcription factors [interferon regulatory factors (IRF) proteins, and beta-TrCP] necessary for robust interferon expression. Current models suggest that NSP1 functions as a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase, an activity that allows the protein to cause the polyubiqutination and proteasome-mediated turnover of targeted host proteins. The topic was recently reviewed in the following publication: Arnold MM, Sen A, Greenberg HB, Patton JT. (2013) The battle between rotavirus and its host for control of the interferon signaling pathway. PLoS Path: 9e1003064.

Additional information on the RMBS is available at:
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/labsandresources/labs/aboutlabs/lid/rotavirus

Requirements:
The position is available immediately and requires an individual with strong written and verbal communications skills and an ability to work efficiently and independently. Qualified candidates will have a Ph.D. and/or M.D. in virology, immunology, molecular biology, or related field.

To Apply:
Candidates should submit a cover letter describing research interests, a curriculum vita, and the names of three references to:

Dr. John T. Patton
Laboratory of Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Building 50, Room 6308
Bethesda, MD 20892
E-mail: jpatton@niaid.nih.gov

The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.

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