ADHD Summer Treatment Program Counselor
Summit Educational Resources - Getzville, NY

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Summit Educational Resources, Inc., announces positions for undergraduate students and graduate students to gain clinical experience in the Summer Treatment Program (STP) for children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Conduct Disorder (CD) or Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD). The program provides treatment tailored to children's individual behavioral and learning difficulties and serves children entering 1st through 10th grade. In 1993, the Summer Treatment Program was named as a Model Program for Service Delivery for Child and Family Mental Health by the Section on Clinical Child Psychology and Division of Child, Youth, and Family Services of the American Psychological Association. Additionally, in 2003 the STP received the Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) Innovative Program of the Year Award. Moreover, the STP has been adopted as a core psychosocial component of the Multisite Treatment Study for ADHD that is funded by NIMH, and the Early Risers Prevention Program funded by SAMHSA.

There are several counselor positions within the STP and your specific role will be determined through the recruitment process. Counselor roles include, lead counselor, recreational counselor, teacher, and teacher’s aide. Counselors will work from Monday, June 25th through Saturday, August 11th, 2012. The hours of the program are from 7:30 AM until 7:30 PM, Monday through Friday, and 8:00 AM until 2:00 PM, on Saturday August 11th, 2012. Counselors are compensated $2,500. Academic course credit can often be arranged through the student's own university department. Arrangements for credit may vary depending on the credit-granting department or university. Counselor and aide positions are only open to individuals currently enrolled in an accredited academic institution.

Lead Counselor and Recreational Counselor: In each Summer Treatment Program, children and counselors are assigned to groups that remain constant for the duration of the program. In the elementary aged program, each group consists of one Lead Counselor, three or four recreational counselors, and 14 to 16 children of similar age. Lead Counselors supervise recreational counselors in implementing the behavior modification treatment during recreational activities including basketball, soccer, and softball. All counselors also conduct sports skills training, social skills training, and problem solving training. During these activities, counselors provide incentives (e.g., giving points, rewards, and/or feedback) to the children for positive behaviors such as following the rules of the activity, helping a peer, sharing with a peer, complying with staff members' commands, contributing to group discussions, and ignoring provocation and insults. Staff members provide consequences (e.g., taking points, removing privileges, or providing time out) from the children for negative behaviors such as aggression, noncompliance, lying, verbal abuse, teasing, swearing, interrupting, and complaining. Counselors will have opportunities during the day to plan activities, to design and revise individualized programs and targets for children's daily report cards, and to meet individually or as a group for supervision from clinical program staff members. There are 3 Lead Counselor positions and 9 recreational counselor positions available in the 2012 STP.

We are looking for hard working, dedicated people who not only have experience working with children, but who also have enough knowledge about various sports that they can appropriately coach and maintain data on each child.

Counselors in the Summer Treatment Program for Adolescents (STP-A) implement behavioral treatment and run recreational activities, but also assist middle and high school aged children in setting up and running a business, performing well in a job, and improving academic and organizational skills. Groups are structured so 3 counselors work with 10 adolescents. One of the 3 counselors is designated as a head counselor. One lead counselor supervises the adolescent groups. There are 6 counselor positions in the 2012 STP-A.

Teacher/Counselor: The STP also includes academic and art components tailored to the specific program and ages of the children and may include academic seatwork, reading instruction, and cooperative learning experiences for elementary aged children and traditional didactic instruction for middle and high school aged children. Middle and high school students are taught health, science, writing, and history curriculum with an emphasis on note taking, study, and test taking skills. Middle and high school students also receive specific instruction on organizational skills. During these activities, teachers implement behavior modification programs that are designed to treat children's problems in a classroom context. Teachers manage the children's behavior in the classrooms using a class-wide token economy that includes both reward components (e.g., receiving privileges or rewards for work completion and accuracy), response-cost components (e.g., losing privileges for violating classroom rules), and time out from positive reinforcement. Public recognition and praise are given for assignment completion and for work accuracy. There are 3 teaching positions available in the 2012 STP: 1) Teaching four 1-hour classes per day to elementary aged children; 2) Teaching history, writing, and organizational skills to adolescent children, and 3) Teaching health and science to adolescent children and running 2 cooperative art learning classes per day to elementary aged children. Teachers are expected to participate in other aspects of the treatment program and communicate with parents, as their time and schedule allows.

Classroom Aide/Counselor: The STP also includes academic and art components tailored to the specific program and ages of the children and may include academic seatwork, computer-aided learning activities, reading instruction, and cooperative learning experiences. During these activities, special education teachers and aides implement behavior modification programs that are designed to treat children's problems in a classroom context. Teachers and aides manage the children's behavior in the classrooms using a class-wide token economy that include both reward components (e.g., receiving privileges or rewards for work completion and accuracy), response-cost components (e.g., losing privileges for violating classroom rules), and time out from positive reinforcement. Public recognition and praise are given for assignment completion and for work accuracy. Aides will be responsible for implementing the classroom behavior management system; assisting the teachers in preparation of daily materials; scoring, grading, and recording of the children's work; and data entry. There are 4 aide/counselor positions available in the 2012 STP. Aides are paid a stipend or are granted educational credits, and must be enrolled in an accredited educational program.

Prior to the start of the STP, all program staff will be required to read the STP manual and have a working understanding of the operational definitions of the categories used in the behavior modification program and the rules for daily activities. During the first week of the program, all staff members will undergo intensive training conducted by the ADHD Program staff. Students will learn the goals and procedures of the program, and they will learn to function as paraprofessional counselors during the six-week Summer Treatment Program. During the program, students will learn:

1. The behavior modification treatment program (token/point economy system, time out, physical management, etc.).
2. Behavioral assessment procedures for pinpointing and monitoring behavior change.
3. How to develop and to implement individualized behavior modification programs, social skills training, and problem solving training procedures for children with peer relationship problems.
4. How to record and track behavioral and academic treatment response data.
EDUCATION and/or EXPERIENCE – Bachelor’s degree in one of the social sciences (e.g., education, psychology) or be working towards Bachelor’s degree with at least 6 months of related experience. Must demonstrate knowledge of disruptive behavior disorders, competencies in working with children/adolescents and cognitive-behavioral techniques.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS – Must be an excellent communicator (verbal and written forms) and able to develop and maintain positive relationships with colleagues, clients and their families.

PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential function of this job.
  • sit, stand, stoop, kneel, crouch and crawl
  • have full usage of sensory abilities (vision, hearing, speech, and tactile senses)
  • perform bodily movements without restriction, with full use of all limbs
WORK ENVIRONMENT: Due to the behavioral disorders of some of the children we serve, persons may be at risk of intentional or unintentional acts of aggression (e.g., hitting, kicking, and biting). The noise level in the work environment is usually moderate.

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