How To Add Music to PowerPoint Slides (Plus Tips)

By Indeed Editorial Team

Published November 9, 2021

The Indeed Editorial Team comprises a diverse and talented team of writers, researchers and subject matter experts equipped with Indeed's data and insights to deliver useful tips to help guide your career journey.

Adding audio to your presentation slides can look like music, narration or audio bites to enhance the points you're making throughout. The right music included in your slides can maintain your audience's attention and help you to feel confident in your speech because the music may calm your nerves about presenting. Understanding how to add music to your slideshow presentation can help you differentiate your presentation from others, which may make it more memorable. In this article, we discuss how to add music to PowerPoint slides and some tips you can use to edit the audio.

Related: 9 PowerPoint Tips and Tricks for 2021

How to add music to PowerPoint slides

There are a few different ways you can include music into your PowerPoint slides. Here are # methods on how to add music to your slideshow presentation:

1. Playing one song across all slides

Here's how to play one song across all your slides:

  1. Open the application and choose either a blank document or select a template you want.

  2. Click on the "Insert" tab and select the "Audio" button on the far right side of the tab.

  3. The application gives you a drop-down section for you to either select "Audio on My PC" or "Record Audio." Select the "Audio on My PC" option.

  4. From there, your file explorer can load for you to choose the music file you want. Once selected, click on "Insert."

  5. Ensure you have the audio icon selected on the "Playback" tab and click on "Play in Background." The "Play in Background" option allows the audio file to play automatically once you enter the presentation, located under the "Slide Show" tab.

  6. If you want to start the music manually, select the "No Style" option in the "Playback" tab. This way, you can start the music by clicking the audio button.

  7. Edit the audio as needed.

Related: How to Record a Voice Over on a PowerPoint Presentation

2. Playing multiple songs across multiple slides

Here's how to play multiple songs across several of your slides seamlessly:

Using Audacity:

  1. Download a free program titled Audacity and launch the application.

  2. Open the tracks you want to connect to your program by clicking on the "File" menu and selecting "Open."

  3. Select the second song on your playlist because you're adding your tracks to the end of each song.

  4. To select an entire song, use your keyboard by pressing the "CTRL" button with the "A" button.

  5. Press "CTRL" plus the "C" button to copy the song.

  6. Then open the window containing your first song and place your cursor at the end of the song and press "CTRL" plus the "V" button to paste the second track at the end of the first one.

  7. Repeat the process for the number of songs you have that you want to combine.

  8. When you've finished, go to the "File" menu and select "Export Audio."

  9. The program opens the save window, select "MP3 Files" in the "Save as type" field. Then click "Save" and wait for it to export to your computer.

Related: How to Share a PowerPoint in 5 Methods (Plus Tips)

Adding it to PowerPoint:

  1. The program opens the window explorer for you to select the tracks you want. To select multiple at a time, hold down the "CTRL' button on your keyboard at the same time you click a song.

  2. Open the PowerPoint application and choose either a blank document or select a template you want.

  3. Click on the "Insert" tab and select the "Audio" button on the far right side of the tab.

  4. The application gives you a drop-down section for you to either select "Audio on My PC" or "Record Audio." Select the "Audio on My PC" option.

  5. From there, your file explorer can load for you to choose the MP3 file you created in Audacity. Once selected, click on "Insert."

  6. Ensure you have the audio icon selected on the "Playback" tab and click on "Play in Background." The "Play in Background" option allows the audio file to play automatically once you enter the presentation, located under the "Slide Show" tab.

  7. If you want to start the music manually, select the "No Style" option in the "Playback" tab. This way, you can start the music by clicking the audio button.

  8. Edit the audio as needed.

Related: 25 Best Royalty-Free Music Websites

Tips for editing audio in PowerPoint

Here are some tips you can use to edit your audio in your slideshow presentation:

Tracking with bookmarks

Tracking audio with bookmarks allows you to jump to specific spots within the audio quickly. To do this, hover over the audio object and the application displays a track time slider. Select a spot on the track time slider to click on "Add Bookmark" button, which creates a bookmark at the exact spot in the music you selected.

Trimming audio

Trimming audio allows you to cut down on the elapsed audio time or remove parts of the song you might not want in your presentation. To do this, click on the "Trim Audio" button and the application displays another window. The new window is for trimming audio, in which you can use the sliders to select your starting and ending points.

Fading audio in and out

Fading your audio in and out allows you to have several songs flow seamlessly together. To do this, use the "Fade Duration" option to set the fade in and out points of your songs. The longer your duration is, the more gradual the fade is going to take.

Adjusting audio volume

Adjusting your audio volume allows you to select when and how loud or quiet you want points of the song to sound. To do this, use the "Volume" button to adjust the master volume. It's helpful to test your slideshow presentation sound and adjust it as needed before you present to an audience to make sure it's at a reasonable volume for everyone to hear.

Please note that none of the companies mentioned in this article are affiliated with Indeed.

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