Career Development

Tips You Will Need When Pitching For a New Position

February 19, 2021

Creating a new position at work can help you better use your skills and further your career goals. Your company can also benefit from your efforts in a new role they may not have realized they needed. In this article, we’ll discuss a number of tips you can use to create an effective job position proposal to present to your employer.

What is a job proposal?

A job proposal is an employee’s pitch that outlines a particular issue within their company and introduces a new role that would solve that problem. The proposal includes details about the new role’s responsibilities and how the employee would use their qualifications and skills to succeed in the position. 

Job proposals can help employees advance in their company and pursue a more focused career path. Creating a new role at the company can also lead to more efficient and profitable outcomes for the business.

If you identify a challenge your company is dealing with and believe you have the right talents to help fix that issue, you may want to consider developing a proposal for a new position. You should have at least a few years of experience at your company or many years of experience in your field before you ask your employer to create a new position for you.

Related: Setting Goals to Improve Your Career

How to write a job proposal for a new position

To change your role within a company, you’ll first need to develop an effective pitch that details why a new job position is necessary and valuable. It is best to prepare a verbal pitch as well as a written proposal to effectively explain what the role is and why you are the right person for it. Use these tips to create a pitch that helps your employer make an informed decision.

  1. Outline a company challenge
  2. Explain the value of the position
  3. Clarify the position duties
  4. Detail your qualifications
  5. Describe your history with the company
  6. Create a written proposal

1. Outline a company challenge

By outlining a problem that is specific to your company, you present the potential value in approving a new position. Identify the obstacle and provide details about how that issue is preventing growth for the company. If possible, use quantifiable data when describing the problem your new position can solve.

Example: “Our automatic scheduling system creates some challenges for the company in terms of overtime use and staff turnover. Because the work schedule is only released a week in advance, employees have trouble planning their personal schedules ahead of time without knowing what their upcoming shifts will be. As a result, they often need to swap shifts or find coverage at the last minute, which leads to excessive overtime costs totaling over $115,000 per year. 

Inconsistent scheduling is also one of the leading reasons for high staff turnover and low employee satisfaction rates. In fact, 60% of employees who quit over the last three years cited uneven shift distribution as their top reason for leaving the company.”

2. Explain the value of the position

Detail how a new position can solve the problem you’ve outlined. The proposed position should address this challenge in a direct and measurable way. Prove to your boss that the job will provide significant value to the company by presenting concrete examples of the actions you can take in this new role.

Example: “As the scheduling coordinator, I would ensure even shift distribution and reduce overtime costs by over $100,000 per year. Unlike an automatic scheduling system, I can work directly with employees to provide the best shifts based on their individual availability. This flexible system will lead to better employee attendance along with higher employee satisfaction and lower staff turnover rates. The annual cost of the automated system would also be eliminated, which offsets the salary of the new position.”

3. Clarify the position duties

Part of your proposal for a new position should be a list of job duties. Research similar positions at other companies to see what tasks are typically required in that type of role. Compare your proposed role with other positions at your company to ensure there are no overlapping duties.

Example: “My duties as the scheduling coordinator would include organizing and preparing the work schedules well in advance so employees can avoid swapping shifts. When scheduling conflicts are present, such as when employees are on vacation or call in sick, I would find coverage while avoiding overtime hours for staff when possible. I’ll also approve and schedule time off for employees and track their use of vacation and sick days and overall attendance records. At the end of each week, I’ll verify employee hours worked for payroll purposes.”

4. Detail your qualifications

Make it clear that, if the new position is approved, you are the best person for the job. Consider what types of skills are required to complete the duties listed in the previous section. This may include measurable skills, like the ability to use certain computer programs, or traits that make you a good fit for the role, such as communication skills or good relationships with fellow staff members.  

Example: “My qualifications for the scheduling coordinator position include my strong written and verbal communication skills, which I will employ when discussing shift preferences with staff and flagging potential issues to upper management. My organizational skills, accurate recordkeeping and proficiency in Microsoft Office programs will be useful in tracking employee attendance and time off, ensuring sufficient shift coverage in each department. I also maintain an amicable relationship with employees and management personnel that will allow me to better manage staff concerns.” 

Related: Tips to Demonstrate Work Ethic

5. Describe your history with the company

Your employment history at your company should play a significant role in advocating for yourself as the ideal candidate for the job. You can detail your past achievements at work and your familiarity with your employer’s procedures and policies. Describe how your history with the company makes you uniquely positioned to understand and solve the challenges you’ve laid out.

Example: “My knowledge of company staffing policies, procedures and best practices will help me to create schedules with more equal shift distribution. Since I will be responsible for covering shifts for last-minute issues like employees calling in sick, my excellent attendance and punctuality make me well-suited to the role. Most importantly, I have a deep understanding of current staffing needs and budget concerns due to my years of experience as a staff manager, so I feel confident that I will be able to resolve these issues in a way that benefits both the shift staff and upper management.” 

6. Create a written proposal

As you craft your new job proposal, prepare a letter with an overview of your pitch along with any documents that detail your request and any supporting research you have conducted. You can also use your written proposal to structure your verbal pitch. Once your written and verbal pitches are ready, set up a time to meet with your boss. Leave your written proposal with your boss so they can look over the details after your meeting.

In this sample proposal letter for new positions, we’ll use the scheduling coordinator example from above:

Dear Ms. Smith,

Due to the ongoing challenges within our scheduling department, I’d like to propose the creation of a new position at ABC, Inc.: Scheduling Coordinator.

According to my research, our automatic scheduling system creates some challenges for the company in terms of overtime use and staff turnover. The work schedule is only released a week in advance, which prevents employees from knowing their upcoming shifts within an adequate amount of time to plan their personal schedules. As a result, they often need to swap shifts or find coverage at the last minute, and employees who cover shifts risk accruing higher amounts of overtime. This inconsistent scheduling is one of the leading reasons for high staff turnover and low employee satisfaction rates at ABC, Inc.

The data I collected on both negative impacts include:

  • Excessive overtime costs totaling over $115,000 per year.
  • 60% of employees who quit over the last three years cited uneven shift distribution as their top reason for leaving the company.

The addition of a scheduling coordinator position would directly address these issues. In this role, I would ensure even shift distribution and reduce overtime costs by over $100,000 per year. Unlike an automatic scheduling system, I can communicate directly with employees to provide the best shifts based on their individual availability. 

This flexible system will lead to better employee attendance along with higher employee satisfaction and lower staff turnover rates. The annual cost of the automated system would also be eliminated, which offsets the salary of the new position.

My duties as the scheduling coordinator would include:

  • Organizing and preparing work schedules in advance to avoid swapping shifts
  • Managing shift coverage while avoiding overtime hours when possible
  • Accommodating scheduling conflicts
  • Tracking employee attendance records including vacation time and sick leave
  • Approving and scheduling time off for employees
  • Verifying weekly employee hours worked for payroll

I have worked for ABC, Inc. for nearly seven years in a variety of staff positions. I am, therefore, familiar with many company policies that affect staff scheduling. My qualifications for the scheduling coordinator position include: 

  • Written and verbal communication skills for discussing shift preferences with staff
  • Critical-thinking skills to flag potential issues and report them to upper management 
  • Organizational skills to ensure proper documentation is filed and shift coverage is sufficient in each department
  • Record-keeping skills to ensure employee preferences are updated regularly to prevent conflicts
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office programs to track employee attendance and time off 
  • Team-building skills to maintain amicable relationships with employees and management personnel to better handle staff concerns

Thank you for taking the time to review this proposal for a new Scheduling Coordinator position. I believe that this role will allow me to put my skills and qualifications to use in order to benefit the company and improve employee retention. Please contact me if you have any other questions about my proposal. I look forward to discussing the opportunity with you further.

Sincerely,

Linda Jones

Related: 10 Tips for Giving a Great Presentation

As you negotiate a possible new position with your employer, continue to demonstrate your work ethic and dedication to the company’s success while still in your current role. Your effective job pitch illustrates the solid return on investment when implementing this new position, and your continued hard work can help your employer see that you are qualified to handle these new responsibilities.

Related

View More 

Top Job Casts of 2021

To close out 2021, we've curated a list of the most popular and helpful Job Cast webinars this year.

FAQ: Do I Need a Master's Degree in Computer Science?

Explore answers to frequently asked questions about earning a master's degree in computer science, including whether you need one and potential career paths.