How To End an Interview: Steps and Tips

By Indeed Editorial Team

Updated August 8, 2022 | Published March 30, 2020

Updated August 8, 2022

Published March 30, 2020

Related: Interview Stage: After the Interview

Jenn, a career coach at Indeed, provides a look at the interviewing process and shares tips on how to position yourself for success after the interview.

How you close a job interview can affect the overall impression the hiring manager has of you as a candidate. If you end the interview successfully, you will leave the hiring manager with a positive memory of you and a better understanding of your skills, qualifications and passion for the position.

In this article, we explore why the way you end an interview is important, steps you can follow to successfully end an interview and tips to increase your chances of getting the job.

Why is it important to end an interview successfully?

How you end an interview can be almost or just as important as how you perform during the interview. The last few minutes of an interview can shape the interviewer's overall impression of you, making it especially important to put thought into how you will close. Putting thought into how you will end an interview can also ensure you are prepared with any questions you have that may not have been addressed and give you a final opportunity to emphasize your interest in the job and the qualifications that make you a great candidate for the position.

Related: 21 Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression

How to end an interview

You can take these steps to ensure you end a job interview successfully:

  1. Ask specific and well-thought-out questions about the position and company.

  2. Reiterate your qualifications for the job.

  3. Inquire if the interviewer requires any additional information or documentation.

  4. Address any issues.

  5. Restate your interest in the position.

  6. Request information on what to expect from here.

  7. Get the interviewer's contact information.

  8. Thank everyone for their time.

  9. Follow up as soon as possible.

1. Ask specific and well-thought-out questions about the position and company

Related: “What Problem Could I Quickly Tackle for You?”

Jenn explains the strategy behind asking the question “What Problem Could I Quickly Tackle for You?” including what you could learn and what it tells the interviewer about you.

Most hiring managers provide the opportunity for candidates to ask questions at the end of an interview. The questions you ask can show you care about the position and are interested in learning all you can. Here are a few questions to consider asking when ending an interview:

  • What would the expectations for me be during my first 90 days in this position?

  • How do you measure performance in this job position?

  • What are the opportunities for advancement like?

  • Why is this role available right now?

  • How would you describe your company's culture?

  • What do you like most about working with this organization?

  • What do you like least about working with this organization?

  • What would you say is the most challenging aspect of the job I am interviewing for?

The more thought-out and pointed your questions are, the better the impression you will likely make on the interviewer.

Read more: 9 Best Questions to Ask Your Interviewer (With Video Examples)

2. Reiterate your qualifications for the job

Before leaving the interview, make sure you reiterate the qualifications that set you apart from the competition. This helps to ensure the interviewer is left with a firm idea of why you're a good candidate for the job.

3. Inquire if the interviewer needs any additional information or documentation

If it was not requested before the interview, ask the interviewer if they would like to see samples of your work, your most recent project or other documentation or information that further showcases your abilities. Offering to share this information also portrays your interest in the job and the belief that you would be an excellent fit.

4. Address any issues

While there may not be apparent issues during the interview, you should consider asking a question such as "Are there any concerns as to my qualifications or ability to perform the duties of this job?" This gives the interviewer the chance to touch on any concerns they have regarding your candidacy and allows you to counter them.

5. Restate your interest in the position

After asking questions and offering to provide additional information, you should restate your interest in the position you are applying for. Interviewers often want to know that you are committed to the position to avoid wasting time and make sure you are still interested after the interview. Avoid sounding disingenuous, but do be passionate about the role.

Related: Interview Stage: End of the Interview

Jenn, a career coach, provides a look at the interviewing process and shares tips on how to position yourself for success at the end of the interview.

6. Request information on what to expect from here

Next, ask for specifics as to what you can expect going forward. Questions to ask include "What are the next steps?" and "When do you plan to inform candidates of your decision?" This also emphasizes your interest and gives you an idea of when you can plan to know more about the job.

7. Get the interviewer's contact information

You also want to make sure you get the interviewer's contact information at the end of the interview. Ask for their direct email address and a work phone number if you feel it is necessary. This is important for when you send a follow-up email after the interview and in case you have additional questions after leaving.

8. Thank everyone for their time

Be sure to thank everyone present during their interview for their time and consideration at the close of the interview. Your thank you can be a simple "Thank you for taking the time to meet with me today, and I look forward to hearing from you soon."

9. Follow up as soon as possible

As soon as possible, send a follow-up email to the person you interviewed with. Be sure to address them directly and once again thank them for their time and consideration. Also, include any additional information that may not have been covered in the interview but that you feel is pertinent to their understanding of you as a candidate. For example, if a particular skill you have that is relevant to the job was not discussed, mention this in your follow-up email.

Read more: Follow-Up Email Examples For After the Interview

Tips to consider when ending a job interview

Here are a few important tips to keep in mind when ending a job interview:

  • Remain composed and professional throughout the entire interview, including when you end the interview and are leaving.

  • Reiterate your interest and qualifications for the position at least once.

  • Research the company before going to the interview so you're equipped with questions to ask at the end of the interview.

  • Ask for the hiring manager's business card.

  • Keep your cell phone on silent and put it away until you have left the interview.

Related: Interview Stage: Following Up After the Interview

Jenn, a career coach, provides a look at the interviewing process and shares tips on how to position yourself for success when following up after the interview.


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