Top Questions You Should Ask in an Interview (By Type)

By Indeed Editorial Team

Updated July 13, 2022 | Published February 25, 2020

Updated July 13, 2022

Published February 25, 2020

Related: Why You Should Ask Questions in an Interview

Jenn explains the importance of asking questions during an interview in order to learn about the job and showcase the value you could add to the role.

An interview is a moment to sell yourself in a way that highlights the necessary skills that make you a qualified candidate for the job. You'll need to practice responses to questions that may relate to the job posting and the qualifications listed for the position. Also, you must come prepared with questions to ask the interviewer to show your interest in the position.

In this article, we discuss the types of questions you should ask when you're interviewing with a hiring manager.

Read more: How To Sell Yourself in an Interview

Types of questions you should ask during an interview

To be successful, you should ask a range of questions during the interview to show your interest and further demonstrate your ability. It's best to write down a list of top questions regarding the position, the interviewer's career path, etc. and bring it to the interview. Here are the types of questions you should ask in an interview and why:

  • Questions about the position

  • Questions about your professional development

  • Questions about the hiring manager

  • Questions about your job performance

  • Questions about the organization

  • Questions about the department where the open position is located

  • Questions about the company culture

  • Questions about the next stage of the interview process

Questions about the position

Related: “Why Is the Team Looking To Fill This Role?”

Jenn explains the strategy behind asking the question “Why Is the Team Looking To Fill This Role?” including what you could learn and what it tells the interviewer about you.

You should have questions prepared to ask the hiring manager about the position you're interviewing for. Targeted questions show your curiosity regarding your day-to-day tasks with the company and how they'll change in the future. Overall, you plan to display that you're engaged in an interview setting and willing to solve the company's problems. The best examples include:

  • Can do you describe what a typical day is for someone working in this position?

  • What types of projects does the department need to be completed right away?

  • Can you provide examples of projects I'll be working on if hired for this role?

  • Is there a set of skills and experience you're looking for from a candidate?

  • What features can lead this hire to be successful in this position?

  • Is there a skills gap that can be filled by the person who fills this position?

  • What are some challenges that employees will face in this role?

  • Is this a new position?

  • Can these responsibilities change over the next year? If so, how different do you think the responsibilities will be?

  • Does this position require travel?

Questions about your professional development

Professional development questions demonstrate if this position has a high potential for growth. This is an important factor, especially if you want to spend your career working for this company.

  • Can you explain the training process for the employee entering this role?

  • Are there training programs available to employees interested in advancing their skills?

  • Do you offer professional development programs for employees?

  • Are there opportunities to represent the organization at industry conferences?

  • Are there formal or informal mentorship programs offered by the organization?

  • Do you offer tuition reimbursement for skills learned outside of the workplace?

  • Would you say this position has multiple career paths?

  • Can you define the opportunities to be promoted in the company?

  • If my goal is to learn a new skill, is it possible to learn it from another employee within the company?

  • How long do you think it will take to adapt to this new role?

Questions about the hiring manager

Related: “What Have You Learned Since Working Here?”

Jenn explains the strategy behind asking the question “What Have You Learned Since Working Here?” including what you could learn and what it tells the interviewer about you.

Asking questions about the hiring manager shows that you're willing to make a distinct connection with them. The type of questions you ask can determine your candidacy for this role, so be careful and concise when asking them.

  • How long have you worked with this organization?

  • How long have you been a part of this industry?

  • What is the most rewarding experience since you've started with the company?

  • How has your role evolved in your tenure with the organization?

  • Why did you decide to work with this company?

  • What position did you work in before this one?

  • What is the best part of working for this organization?

  • How would you define your career path leading up to this point?

  • What is the most challenging aspect of working with this company?

  • What would you have done differently with your career path?

Questions about your job performance

You want to have an in-depth conversation related to the metrics they're using to evaluate your performance. The way the hiring manager answers these questions give you clues about the leadership structure of the company.

  • What are the most important goals to meet during the first 90 days of employment?

  • What are your performance expectations for my first 12 months with the company?

  • What does the performance evaluation process look like?

  • What metrics will you use to critique my performance?

  • How often will I be updated about my performance?

  • What type of mistakes do people make in this role?

  • What is your viewpoint of mistakes and their relationship to long-term performance?

  • Is there one area of performance you prioritize as of right now?

  • Who is responsible for tracking my performance?

  • Is it expected to reach this performance benchmark right away?

Questions about the organization

Related: “What Trends Will Affect the Company Next Year?”

Jenn explains the strategy behind asking the question “What Trends Will Affect the Company Next Year?” including what you could learn and what it tells the interviewer about you.

The knowledge that a hiring manager has on a company can determine if they're the right person to be in a management role. It also depends on how long they've been with the company. For example, the hiring manager of a startup might know less than one at a corporation.

  • Can you tell me about the founding of the company?

  • Where do you see the organization heading in the next 10 years?

  • Can you describe the trajectory of the company's strategy for expansion over the next five years?

  • What type of goals is the company trying to accomplish right now?

  • What makes you energized about the organization's future?

  • Are you increasing staff in other areas of the company?

  • Can you speak more about your product's growth shortly?

  • How would you describe the company's core values?

  • How important is the sales team's role in helping achieve your goals and continue to scale?

  • How has your product's growth inspired employees within the company?

Questions about the department where the open position is located

This is a critical line of questioning because you're getting to know the specifics of your coworkers. You'll also see the types of processes that your coworkers abide by to generate success.

  • Who is the person that I'm directly reporting to?

  • Can you explain more about the department that I'll be working with?

  • Is there another coworker that I'll work closely with other than my manager?

  • What do you believe are my manager's greatest strengths and weaknesses?

  • Is there going to be more hires in this department over the next year?

  • Is there another department that I'll be coordinating with daily?

  • Is there a common trajectory for people who've previously worked in this department?

  • What opportunities do you see from working with this team?

  • Are you aware of team-building activities that this department participates in?

  • How much of an impact do you believe this department has in regards to the success of the company?

Questions about the company culture

Questions about the company's culture show how well the hiring managers get along with the rest of their team members. The more positive responses they give about their coworkers, the more likely they have a close relationship with them.

  • How would you depict the company's culture?

  • Do you believe that this organization has a collaborative work environment?

  • What was the last company-wide team event you participated in?

  • What was the result of that experience with the rest of the team?

  • Do you have a favorite office event or tradition?

  • How often do you have lunch with fellow employees?

  • Do you meet up with employees outside of the office? If so, how often?

  • Are there joint events with other companies in the area?

  • Are there volunteering opportunities that employees can sign up for?

  • In what ways has the company changed since you began your tenure?

Questions about the next stage of the interview process

You'll want to be clear and concise with your questioning here since you're looking for a set answer on the next steps of the hiring process. These questions should be reserved until you're asked for additional questions by the hiring manager.

  • Do you have further questions to ask about my background or experience?

  • Can you explain the next steps of the interview process at this time?

  • Is there any additional information you need that would be beneficial to the hiring process?

  • Can I answer any final questions that are on your mind?

Read more: Choosing a Career Path in 9 Steps

Related: “What Feedback Do You Have for Me?”

Jenn explains why you should ask “What Feedback Do You Have for Me?” including what you could learn and what it tells the interviewers about you when you ask it.


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