How to Format a Two-Page Resume Header (With Example)

By Indeed Editorial Team

Updated February 22, 2021 | Published February 25, 2020

Updated February 22, 2021

Published February 25, 2020

If you are an experienced candidate with a work history and skills that are highly relevant to a position, a two-page resume can be a good idea. Using a two-page resume header can help the hiring manager easily see that your resume is two pages long and keep your contact information conveniently in front of them when they're scanning Page Two.

In this article, we discuss how to create a two-page resume header, when to use a two-page resume and some tips for creating one. We also provide an example so you can see what a two-page resume header looks like.

When to use a two-page resume header

Use a two-page header when you are creating a resume that is two pages long, in order to indicate that the second page also is part of your resume.

How to create a two-page resume header

Here are steps to create a two-page header for your resume:

1. Use proper formatting

The margins for your resume should be 1-inch wide and the font should be easy to read. The best fonts for resumes are Arial, Helvetica or Calibri.

Related: Best Font for a Resume: How to Choose Type and Size

2. Add your contact information to the Page One header

The header on the first page should include all of your contact information. This includes your full name, phone number, mailing address and email address, as well as your website or portfolio link if you have one.

3. Add a separate header to Page Two

Add a header to the second page of your resume. Include your full name, phone number, email address and the words "Page Two" to make it clear that this is part of your resume. The font should be the same style that you used on Page One, but should be smaller than the font you used throughout the rest of the resume.

Related: How to Make a Resume (With Examples)

When to use a two-page resume

A two-page resume is appropriate if you are a highly experienced candidate. If you have tailored your resume for the position you're applying to and removed unrelated skills or irrelevant work experiences and you still can't fit the resume onto one page, you should add a second page.

Some careers that may require a two-page resume include:

  • Project manager

  • Office manager

  • Sales manager

  • Executive

  • Business analyst

  • Computer science manager

  • Marketing manager

  • Accountant

  • Financial analyst

Benefits of a two-page resume

There are two primary reasons why you may want to consider writing a two-page resume:

Easier to skim when you have a lot of experience

One benefit of a two-page resume is that it allows you to spread the information out more so it can be skimmed more easily by a hiring manager. While you may be able to fit all of the information onto a single page, if there is a lot of information on that page, it can be difficult to read.

More room for resume keywords

Another benefit of a two-page resume is that you have more space to expand on your most relevant experiences and, inevitably, more room to add relevant resume keywords. By adding more of the keywords that the employer is looking for, you have a greater likelihood of getting past any filters on the applicant tracking system (ATS) that the employer may use.

Related: Resume Samples and Templates

Two-page resume tips

Here are some tips to help you create a strong two-page resume:

  • Put your contact information on both pages

  • List skills and summary statement only once

  • Be as concise as possible

  • Put the most important information first

  • Focus on the last 10 years

  • Put education and certifications on Page Two

  • If it's less than 1.5 pages, make it one page instead

  • Use two sheets

Put your contact information on both pages

Be sure to place your contact information, particularly your phone number and email address, on both pages of the resume. This will make it easy for the hiring manager to remember whose resume they are reading, even when on the second page.

List skills and summary statement only once

Only list your skills and other core information like your summary or objective statement on Page One of your resume. Listing this information on both pages can distract the hiring manager from your experience and accomplishments.

Be as concise as possible

Even though you are adding a second page to your resume, you should still be as concise as possible. Remove any irrelevant skills or work experiences so the resume is tailored specifically for the job you're applying to.

Put the most important information first

When creating your two-page resume, assume there is a strong likelihood that the hiring manager may not get to the second page. For this reason, always put the most important information on the first page of your resume, ideally on the top half of the page.

Focus on the last 10 years

Unless there is a position you held more than 10 years ago that you think would help you get this particular job, concentrate your work history on the last 10 years of your career. Within each description, highlight your most noteworthy accomplishments, specifically the ones where you can quantify your results. For example, "Increased sales revenue by 25% over six months."

Put education and certifications on Page Two

Place information about your degrees, certifications and professional associations on the second page of your two-page resume. If you have space on your resume and have relevant volunteer information, you may want to include that on the second page as well.

If it's less than 1.5 pages, make it one page instead

While it can be beneficial to have a resume that's two pages long if you are highly experienced, if your resume is less than one-and-a-half pages long, edit or format the document down to one page.

Use two sheets

If you are submitting a physical resume for a position and it's two pages long, make sure you print it on two sheets of paper rather than making it two-sided. The second side of a two-sided, one-page resume may be accidentally overlooked by the hiring manager.

Two-page resume header example

Here is an example of what your two-page resume header should look like:

Page One

Michelle Alan
9016 South River Road, Austin, TX 32512 | 555-555-5555
michelle.alan@email.com | linkedin.com/in/michelle.alan

Page Two

Michelle Alan - Page Two
michelle.alan@email.com | 555-555-5555

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