Doer vs. Achiever Resume: Definitions and Examples

By Indeed Editorial Team

Published October 8, 2021

The Indeed Editorial Team comprises a diverse and talented team of writers, researchers and subject matter experts equipped with Indeed's data and insights to deliver useful tips to help guide your career journey.

Creating an effective resume can help you in your career search by quickly showing hiring managers your qualifications and experience. The language you use to describe yourself and your past positions can show potential employers that you are a doer or an achiever, which might affect your chances of being hired for certain positions. If you're applying for jobs, you may benefit from understanding the difference between doer and achiever resumes. In this article, we define doer and achiever resumes, describe the differences between these two approaches and provide examples of both types of resumes.

Related: Here's Everything You Should Include on a Resume

What does it mean to be a doer on your resume?

Writing a resume as a doer means stating what you did in previous positions or what you're doing at your current job. You might include information on key duties or responsibilities, software proficiencies and other details about your daily work. You might customize your descriptions to connect with the posted description of your desired job to help the hiring manager see that you have the skills to meet the position's requirements.

Related: Listing Professional Experience on Your Resume

Doer resume language

Doer resumes are often direct and concise, listing key duties using active verbs. Here are some words you might use in a doer resume to describe your prior job experience:

  • Performed

  • Completed

  • Managed

  • Recorded

  • Responded

  • Helped

What does it mean to be an achiever on your resume?

An achiever resume highlights the effects of your efforts in your prior job while also describing your key responsibilities. You might provide metrics for success or describe important projects you took part in during your tenure at a company. By describing your accomplishments, you can show a hiring manager that you can bring value to their organization. Creating a resume that shows you're an achiever can give you an advantage in the hiring process, especially if you're applying to leadership positions.

Related: How To Describe Your Work Experience on Your Resume (With Examples)

Achiever resume language

Because achiever resumes focus on accomplishments, you might use words that suggest success or leadership in your professional summary and description of prior experience. Here are some words you might use to show your accomplishments in a resume:

  • Led

  • Accomplished

  • Optimized

  • Improved

  • Accelerated

  • Increased

  • Developed

  • Resolved

Doer vs. achiever resume

While both resumes might include the same basic information, they usually focus on different aspects of previous jobs. A doer resume focuses on the tasks that you've completed, while an achiever resume shows how you brought value to the company through your actions. Achiever resumes often use examples and statistics to show how the candidate met or exceeded the requirements of their previous positions, which can persuade a hiring manager of the candidate's potential.

For example, a doer resume for a sales representative might describe a previous job by stating the candidate "spoke to potential customers and helped them through the sales process," while an achiever resume for the same position might say the candidate "exceeded quarterly sales goals by an average of 15% and brought almost 300 new customers to the organization." The doer resume describes the candidate's responsibilities, while the achiever resume shows how the candidate met or surpassed their goals.

Related: Top Resume Tips To Help You Get Hired

Doer resume example

Here's an example of a doer resume for a customer services representative candidate that summarizes the candidate's previous duties:

Mary Greer
Atlanta, Georgia
(404) 777-7777
mary.greer@email.com

Professional summary
Experienced, dedicated customer services representative with over 8 years of experience in the telecommunication industry. A skilled communicator and natural leader seeking an advanced customer services role.

Relevant professional experience
Customer services team lead
BCD Internet
Roswell, Georgia
August 2016–September 2021

  • Served as team lead for customer services representatives

  • Assisted customers with connectivity and contract issues

  • Trained new customer service professionals

Customer services representative
Connected Georgia Phone Services
Augusta, Georgia
June 2013–July 2016

  • Responded to customer questions via phone and email

  • Performed troubleshooting operations

  • Kept detailed notes for customer files

Education
Associate of Arts in communication
Eastern Augusta Community College
Augusta, Georgia
May 2013

Skills

  • Proficient in Spanish

  • Skilled in database management

Achiever resume example

Here's an example of an achiever resume for the same position, showing how the candidate brought value to previous employers by documenting specific achievements:

Mary Greer
Atlanta, Georgia
(404) 777-7777
mary.greer@email.com

Professional summary
Experienced, dedicated customer services representative with over eight years of proven success in the telecommunication industry. Skilled in leading teams and improving customer service policies, ensuring an increased referral and renewal rate among current customers.

Relevant professional experience
Customer services team lead
BCD Internet
Roswell, Georgia
August 2016–September 2021

  • Successfully led team of six customer service representatives to resolve an average of 150 tickets per week

  • Assisted over 400 customers with connectivity and contract issues

  • Created curriculum to train new employees, improving average ticket resolution rate by 20% for team members in their first month

Customer services representative
Connected Georgia Phone Services
Augusta, Georgia
June 2013–July 2016

  • Resolved customer tickets via phone and email with a 90% customer retention rate

  • Led troubleshooting operations for over 200 residential and commercial telecommunication accounts

  • Created a new system for recording customer notes and documenting solutions, ensuring consistency among team members

Education
Associate of Arts in communication
Eastern Augusta Community College
Augusta, Georgia
May 2013

Skills

  • Proficient in Spanish

  • Skilled in database management

Tips for changing your resume from a doer to an achiever

You might find that hiring managers prefer achiever resumes for certain positions, such as leadership or development jobs. Here's how you can transform your doer resume into one that shows your achievements:

Use numbers

One way you can show your achievements is by tracking or estimating the number of tasks you complete in a position. Providing the number of clients you assisted, orders you filled, projects you managed or other items can show a hiring manager you can work quickly and efficiently. If you've worked in positions where you met sales targets or managed budgets, you can also provide information about the amount of money you brought to a company or your ability to balance a large budget.

Describe projects

If you took part in improvement projects in any prior positions, you can include information about the project's goals and results in your resume. For example, if you helped to create an internal wiki to document your previous company's operating procedures, you can specify how many entries you wrote or the skills you developed to work on the project. Describing successful projects can show a hiring manager you are an effective team member and that you're interested in learning new skills.

Connect achievements to the job description

When you're describing your achievements in your resume, consider using details that relate to requirements from the job description. For example, if a job description states that the hiring manager is looking for "an experienced administrative professional with experience leading a team," you might describe how many years you've been working as an administrator, describe the largest or most effective team you've directed so far and include examples of some projects you've led in your prior work. Customizing your achievements to the job description can show a hiring manager you're a good fit for the role.

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