How To Write a Follow-up Email After a Verbal Job Offer

Jamie Birt

Updated May 25, 2022

Published April 5, 2021

Jamie Birt is a career coach with 5+ years of experience helping job seekers navigate the job search through one-to-one coaching, webinars and events. She’s motivated by the mission to help people find fulfillment and belonging in their careers.

Hiring managers often make verbal job offers during interviews. Though receiving a verbal job offer can be an encouraging first step, there are still additional steps you may need to take to secure employment. If you were offered a position verbally but have not received a written job offer or employment contract, you may want to send a follow-up email to see if there's anything you can do to help with the hiring process.

In this article, we explain when to follow up, what to do in the meantime and how to write follow-up emails to both inquire about the next steps or to decline the offer.

When to follow up with an email after a verbal job offer

After the hiring manager offered you the position during or at the end of your interview, it's important to remember that there are still additional steps you may need to take to earn the job. If the hiring manager doesn't reach out in an email or send you an employment contract to sign, you may want to send a follow-up email. This can help you confirm your employment and learn additional information about the position.

Consider sending a follow-up email one or two business days after your interview. However, if your interview was later in the workday, consider waiting at least two days before following up with an email.

Related: Contracts of Employment: A Comprehensive Guide

What to do while you wait for a response from the hiring manager

There are a variety of reasons there may be a delay before you receive an employment contract. In some cases, the hiring manager may be waiting for another coworker's approval or is still drafting the offer. If your interview took place on a Friday, the hiring manager may wait for the next business day to send you the written offer.

While it is normal to experience a waiting period like this, consider continuing your search for other jobs that interest you. This way, if you decide not to accept the offer, you can continue the application process for other jobs without a delay.

Related: 10 Tips To Using Indeed To Job Search

How to write a follow-up email after a verbal job offer

To create a follow-up email, follow these steps:

1. Start with a polite greeting

It's polite to start written correspondence with a greeting. A salutation followed by the hiring manager's name is common. For example, you could write, "Hello, Ms. DeFrank."

2. Thank them for the interview

Write a sentence that expresses your appreciation to the hiring manager for the interview and job offer. You may want to mention that you enjoyed meeting them or express your excitement for the opportunity. Consider writing something like, "Thank you so much for taking the time to meet with me on Thursday. It was so great to meet you. I am very excited about this opportunity!" This can remind the hiring manager about your interview and maintain a good impression.

3. Ask about a timeline

Asking about a timeline of employment can show that you are responsible and eager to start work. Consider inquiring about when you can expect to receive a formal offer of employment. Though you likely already told the manager during your interview, it can also be helpful to mention when you are available to start work, as your employer may need to put a start date in your offer letter. Try writing something like, "I am writing to confirm the details of my employment. When can I expect to receive a formal employment contract? I would be happy to start as soon as possible or as needed."

4. Confirm your next steps

In order to officially draft an employment contract, the hiring manager may need additional information from you. It is polite to ask if the company needs you to take any steps to make this happen. Consider writing something such as, "Please let me know the next steps I need to take in this process. If you require any additional information from me, I am happy to provide whatever you may need."

5. Repeat your thanks

To end your email, thank the hiring manager again for the opportunity and offer a polite phrase of closing. Try writing something like, "Thank you again for the job offer! I look forward to hearing from you."

Related: 10 Ways To Write a Strong Email Signature

6. Proofread your email

After you finish drafting your email, reread it to check for clarity. Proofreading your email can also help you ensure that your grammar, spelling and format are correct. This can show that you are professional and detail-oriented.

Related: Top Email Etiquette Examples for Professional Communication

Tips for writing a follow-up email to decline a verbal offer

If you decide after the interview to pursue another opportunity, it is polite to inform the hiring manager of your decision as soon as possible. Even if you have not received a written job offer, it may save the hiring manager time if you let them know you do not plan on accepting the position. This way, they do not need to draft a written job offer or employment contract.

To write a follow-up email to decline a verbal job offer, follow these tips:

  • Make sure that your decision is clear. In your first paragraph, clearly state that you are no longer interested in the offer. It's common to give a brief reason for declining an offer, though not necessary.

  • Keep your message concise. Try to keep your email to one or two paragraphs if you're declining an offer so the hiring manager can quickly read your message.

  • Thank them for the opportunity. To be polite, thank the hiring manager for their time and the opportunity. Being courteous in your email can help you maintain a connection should you want to apply for another job with the company in the future.

Follow-up email templates

To create your follow-up email, follow these templates:

Asking for a formal offer

Subject: [Your name, job title]

Hello, [name of hiring manager/interviewer],

I appreciate you taking the time to meet with me on [day of the interview]. It was great to meet you! Thank you so much for the job offer.

I am writing to confirm the next steps of this offer. Will you be sending a formal offer letter or employment contract? I am very excited about this opportunity and can be available to start [preferred start date].

Please let me know the next steps I need to take in this process. I am happy to provide any additional information you may need.

Thank you again for this exciting opportunity. I look forward to hearing from you!

Best,

[your name]

Declining the offer

Subject: [Your name, job title]

Hello [name of hiring manager/interviewer],

I appreciate you taking the time to meet with me on [day of the interview]. It was great to meet you!

Though I appreciate your job offer, I cannot accept this position at this time. [optional: explain reason].

Thanks again for your time and offer. I wish you the best of luck in your search for a great professional for this role.

Sincerely,

[your name]

Follow-up email examples

Review these examples when writing your own email:

Asking for next steps

Subject: Evan Nash, technical lead role

Hello Ms. Diaz,

Thank you so much for the job offer. I appreciate the time you took to meet with me on Monday. It was great to meet you!

I am writing to confirm the details of this offer. Will you send a formal offer letter or employment contract or should I expect to sign one on my first day of work? I am very excited about this opportunity and can be available to start any time after the first of April.

Please let me know the next steps I need to take in this process. I am happy to provide any additional information you may need from me.

Thank you again for this exciting opportunity. I look forward to joining the team!

Best,

Evan Nash

Declining an offer

Subject: Edrisa Bright, customer service representative role

Hello Ms. Kennedy,

Thank you so much for taking the time to interview me on Tuesday. It was lovely meeting you!

Though I appreciate your offer, I cannot accept this position for personal reasons.

Thanks again for your time and offer. I wish you the best of luck in your search for a great professional for this role.

Sincerely,

Edrisa Bright

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