Questions and Answers about Denver Public Schools

Here's what people have asked and answered about working for and interviewing at Denver Public Schools.

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18 questions

Sad. I have a friend that got her Masters in Education, and ESL yet as bad off as our school districts are, and they are, even the State Dept. of Education told me by email that they would not apply and sponsor her to stay in this state. What a waste!! She was a 3.9 gpa and got a scholarship to CU Boulder for her Masters. It now expires in July and the State told me they wouldn't sponsor her for the H1-B visa which they would have to hire her, apply for the visa and this needs to done asap as her current visa expires in July. Her students at a STRIVE school love her. Her teachers at CU Boulder did a newspaper article about her as she is the ONLY woman to graduate with her Masters on a scholarship! What does the State of CO. and Denver Public Schools want? They would have excellency in this woman's teaching. If only they would put out some money, hire her and do the application for the H-1B visa, good for 3 years and extension of 3 more years. Then she can apply for permanent residency. She plans to get her PhD as well. What a waste of a wonderful teacher. It seems to be because she is from Saudi Arabia, well they have been our ally for years. Why don't they do this visa? The cost to the district is a small amount compared to the amount spent and our kids graduate from high school and can't read. It disgusts me. But she told me when she interviews they are all excited until she tells them she needs the visa to stay here past July and she said she could see it in their eyes, it was going to be no, they don't want to spend money on the visa. Well our students don't seem to be doing so well with American teachers so help her, help her to help our children. She is a peace loving, caring person who just wants to stay in the U.S. with her 2 children, one of them was born here, and enjoy teaching and the freedoms of the U.S. She has worked very hard for this. Someone knows how she can get that visa yet they won't share that information with me to share with her. She was told it was $5,500.00 fee for the visa and the school has to have offered her a job. It sounds like a lot yet when you think about how many students won't learn to read or English (which she teaches) or anything else. They need personal attention which she has been able to do at the STRIVE school in Denver, a college prep school and she teaches 6th graders, 17 in her class. Isn't she worth the fee and the paperwork and the job offer if she can get these kids ready for the next college prep step? She can certainly teach children who just need special attention, that is her specialty. Or we can keep going the way we are and score as one of the WORST places to live for education purposes. It is up to Denver Public Schools and the State Dept. of Education, who I also contacted and they emailed me and said they don't do the H1-B visa, why not? Our kids need it!!! I also noticed the people giving DPS a good vote were prior employees, that is kind of strange. No, they don't have to work there anymore, but my good friend wants to help DPS do better, and the students who attend these schools.

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DPS has the highest turnover rate of any district in the metro area. Twenty seven percent of employees left DPS last year. This turnover creates a never-ending environment of uncertainty.

The district is also top heavy. DPS has more than four times the number of administrators as Jefferson County, a school district that has the same student enrollment. As a result, few resources are devoted to funding the practices that have been proven to help students succeed.

In short, it's a pretty horrible place to work. Just ask a quarter of the people who worked there last year and left.

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Current knowledge of latest educational research.

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Health insurance benefits.

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Pretty formal. Interviews consist of large groups of teachers and administrators reading pre-printed questions. Many times, the principal already has someone in mind for the job, and the interview is just a formality to show that a job search took place. I was offered jobs, accepted, and THEN the job was posted.

Most principals in DPS do not get back to you if they aren't going to offer you the job.

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Fast paced usually on the go

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They are also out for the summer

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8 hours plus professional developments that sometimes are mandatory and after school. Innumerous meetings before and after school and lots of work hours at home.

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About every two years

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Don’t intend on leaving.

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