Following Up With a Different Manager After a Phone Interview

Hello! I have a situation I am not sure what to do in. I had a phone interview two weeks ago, which I think went well, and the hiring manager I spoke with said that he'd be in touch by the end of the following week. It is now Tuesday, so a couple business days past that deadline, so I sent a brief email to follow up. The hiring manager very kindly responded and said he was unexpectedly out of the office this week, but that he had forwarded my application materials to the VP who "may" be in touch with me soon. He also told me they were still accepting applications and speaking with new candidates. I replied to thank him for taking the time to respond despite being out of the office and that I understood it was a process and would keep waiting. My question is, should I send a short email to the VP who now has my application? Not so much to "follow-up" but just to virtually introduce myself and reiterate my interest. Would that make me look interested and impressive with my initiative or just desperate and annoying a probably-busy person by filling up a probably-already-full inbox? The VP was cc'd on an earlier email to me, so I have his address. I am just not sure if it is a good idea or not. Or does the fact that they're still looking at new resumes and talking to new candidates indicate that they've already dismissed my candidacy and I just shouldn't bother?
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Hello! I have a situation I am not sure what to do in. I had a phone interview two weeks ago, which I think went well, and the hiring manager I spoke with said that he'd be in touch by the end of the following week. It is now Tuesday, so a couple business days past that deadline, so I sent a brief email to follow up. The hiring manager very kindly responded and said he was unexpectedly out of the office this week, but that he had forwarded my application materials to the VP who "may" be in touch with me soon. He also told me they were still accepting applications and speaking with new candidates. I replied to thank him for taking the time to respond despite being out of the office and that I understood it was a process and would keep waiting. My question is, should I send a short email to the VP who now has my application? Not so much to "follow-up" but just to virtually introduce myself and reiterate my interest. Would that make me look interested and impressive with my initiative or just desperate and annoying a probably-busy person by filling up a probably-already-full inbox? The VP was cc'd on an earlier email to me, so I have his address. I am just not sure if it is a good idea or not. Or does the fact that they're still looking at new resumes and talking to new candidates indicate that they've already dismissed my candidacy and I just shouldn't bother?
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Hello! I have a situation I am not sure what to do in. I had a phone interview two weeks ago, which I think went well, and the hiring manager I spoke with said that he'd be in touch by the end of the following week. It is now Tuesday, so a couple business days past that deadline, so I sent a brief email to follow up. The hiring manager very kindly responded and said he was unexpectedly out of the office this week, but that he had forwarded my application materials to the VP who "may" be in touch with me soon. He also told me they were still accepting applications and speaking with new candidates. I replied to thank him for taking the time to respond despite being out of the office and that I understood it was a process and would keep waiting. My question is, should I send a short email to the VP who now has my application? Not so much to "follow-up" but just to virtually introduce myself and reiterate my interest. Would that make me look interested and impressive with my initiative or just desperate and annoying a probably-busy person by filling up a probably-already-full inbox? The VP was cc'd on an earlier email to me, so I have his address. I am just not sure if it is a good idea or not. Or does the fact that they're still looking at new resumes and talking to new candidates indicate that they've already dismissed my candidacy and I just shouldn't bother?
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After a business day or two, I think its fine to reach out to VP to give, as you mentioned, a virtual intro. I would respond to the same email thread so that the hiring manager is also copied. The hiring manager could’ve said they’re still interviewing candidates to genuinely let you know it might take a while or they could’ve selected someone else. Either way, I definitely think it will show initiative if you reach out with a brief message. We all know how busy VP’s get so the email could also serve as a reminder to her or him to review your application if they forgot. I wouldn’t stress too much about the delay, everything is probably hectic with the hiring manager’s unexpected leave. Keep us posted on how things go.

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Yes, simply state that Mr. Hiring Manager indicated that he was unexpectedly called away and that he mentioned that he had submitted your resume to him (Mr. VP) and that you wished to simply follow-up on the status of your application.  Ensure you BRIEFLY reiterate your goals and talents (highlighting the parts of the conversation with Mr. Hiring Manager).  Thank Mr. VP for his time and consideration.  Make sure you copy Mr. Hiring Manager.  You should be good to go-  Best of luck!!  Bea

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Hi @Ramura,

Both Alex_B and bkee1 have shared solid suggestions and I would like to take a moment to add to the thread.  Since you are aware that there are other applicants vying for the same position, it would benefit you to follow up with the VP.  Since his contact information was provided on the thread, that provides the opportunity to reach out.  Be sure you include the hiring manager in the communication thread as well - you don't want it to appear you're going over his head or alienating him in anyway.  You can either follow up with a note or email that reiterates your desire to work for the organization as well as your current strengths and accomplishments and how you can aid them to meet their goals.  

Following up is an easy gesture  and also provides you another opportunity to present why you are the best candidate for the job.  It is always a good step to find information that you can add to your resume so that you are not just reiterating what they have on file - I usually tell clients to find a goal that you can complete within the first 30 days on the job that will help the company move forward - demonstrating your value. Good luck. - Patricia 

 

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Hello Rumara,

Thank you for taking the time to reach out to the Indeed community and provide such thoughtful context around your situation and question. You’ve inspired a robust conversation thread as well as Valuable, tactical insights from the community and intel for candidates who’ve likely questioned the same when considering protocol, that delicate balance between being proactive and reactive, so to speak.

My only add-on here to view your professional brand (no matter where you fall on the work history continuum) as energetic, knowledgeable about the co’s. Culture, distinguishing characteristics and what essentially distinguishes you as a candidate. Find your storyline and share, reemphasize why this role and organization is right for you and what you intend to bring to the team. I’d also cc your direct point of contact, the hiring manager and to your earlier point, reference your positive interview with him prior to his unexpected Leave.

You’re asking all the right questions and you can never go wrong when you’re authentic in your outreach and thoughtful about the reasons behind such. 

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The tricky part about your situation is that you did not interview with the VP, so it's almost like you have to re-create your image again to another person. Speaking on some of CarrieOnCoach's points, I would agree that telling a story about yourself is a great way to go about it. At the end of the day the credentials that you have may be shared by multiple candidates but your passion for the position is what will shine through.

 

That fine balance between being persistent and a hindrance is still something a lot of professionals struggle with. I believe this comes down to the charisma of the person and how they address the situation. Stay positive and light but also informative and you'll do great!

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Feb 29, 2020 Solution
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Certainly -- show your interest in the job and the company. First, do research on the job and the company.  Then suggest how much you are pleased to be considred and liking forward to contributing to the company's success.

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Mar 31, 2020 Solution
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Hi @Prycejosh,

I think reaching out to the VP is perfectly fine.  As you stated, I would reiterate your interest and excitement for the opportunity.  I found this link that I feel would be very helping being your current situation:

 

https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/interviewing/what-to-do-when-you-dont-get-a-response-after-inte...

 

 

This information is provided as a courtesy for informational purposes only. We are not career or legal advisors and do not guarantee job interviews or offers.
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May 26, 2020 Solution
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from experience and also not tell you what to do. usually if a business doesnt call you back when they say they will it means they dont want to hire you. normally but also it may not mean that and they have been busy and just havent had a chance to call or email you. im not a professional but i have been in this position before. thought i would just give some advise. dont stop applying for other jobs and not ever give up you can find that dream job. good luck to you. 

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May 3, 2020 Solution
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I would say 'yes', send a short, well written note to the VP.   It will indicate your sincerity and is not likely to be viewed in a bad light by the VP.  Sometimes the final decision to chose among multiple qualified candidates is decided just by the one that shows the most interest. 

 

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May 4, 2020 Solution
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