Working at Aflac

two words flim flam, if you want to "work for the" you had better just bring $600 for all the fees and classes and ****. they dont tell you this on the phone but they will not even touch you til you pay.
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
It's the same in Kentucky. I had accounts stolen from me by another Agent who said they were working with me but had never worked with me one day! When I went to Corporate, they said that the State office had to deal with it and what they said went. The State office gave my accounts to the other individual who stole them from me by lying to the account saying "they were working with me and I sent them to get the contract signed" mind you, I had an appointment with these accounts for just that, that same day. This individual took information shared in the morning meeting to steal from me and they did nothing. The accounts dropped AFLAC!
0
Dec 12, 2019 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Many helpful answers here. When I was looking for work on the skill of woodworking, I still did not know much, some special "secrets". Now, just need to own the tools such as thecozyholic.com/best-hybrid-table-saw with hundred percent. You need to be a professional. Technologies are improving faster and faster and you need to always be in the "topic". One of the special requirements at the moment is the ability to work with the treatment using a hybrid table with a saw.
0
Apr 16, 2019 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Highlighted
[Question? We are supposed to look you up to see that what you say is true,correct? We already know some of it, at least,is not, unless you have been trapped in a stationary time-space warp for 11 years. In the beginning of your diatribe you say that you began with AFLAC in 2007. By the end of your comment, you just completed your first year, having hit $185,000. How did it take you 11 years to complete one year?
0
Aug 8, 2018 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Seriously!? I'm in VA and I believe Im awesome at sale and I was just hired but reading some of the negative reviews about not making a dime your first month is freaking me out when I have rent and a child to provide for. I was told I wouldn't make much my first month but not to worry it would be enough to pay my bills. The reviews are scaring me.
0
Jul 1, 2018 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Hey Jake,
I might not be the best person to talk to since i did not have success with this business.
Im not even able to say what i did wrong!
They tell you how easy it is and then it is not easy.
I lost my one group that i took care of for two years.
That made me a little sad.
Plus, i thought of all the other Afalc reps that did the same thing i did,and lost those hard worked for account(s).
They told me they would terminate me (after 2 years) Heck, i lost the second years commission because my boss generously gave me two clients but they defaulted so i had to pay THAT back with my commission from the first client.
They told my boss to “take anyone that walks in" how does that sound to you?
0
Jan 11, 2018 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Jake, before you consider going to work in any agency you need to consider a couple of things. New people in the business do not understand so much. They accept crappy contracts, have several managers above them that all you do is make them money, and get messed over if they do not stay for some ridiculous number of years they give up their renewals. Having been in the business for many many years and have a 95% success rate with my agents that only work 20 weeks a year and make lets just say alot more than the average agent in the business.

I teach them how to work 20 weeks a year and never ever cold call,,,, never ever have to try to sell something to someone that does not need or can afford it, and have lifetime renewals vested day one and their contracts are the highest in the business.. You can reach out to me if you would like and I will explain how the insurance business actually works... two54 two two 3-thirty 39.... David Gosnell
0
Jan 11, 2018 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Nothing worth achieving comes without hard work, a commitment of time, and knowledge. Don't be a seat warmer all of your life. Get out and live it. AFLAc is YOUR business. If you work it, it pays. If you commit the time, knowledge, and sweat equity, you will get the income you want and need. I've been doing this for four months and know the above to be true.
0
Apr 18, 2017 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Highlighted
Obviously things have probably changed over the years but could you enlighten me on how long it takes on average to get trained/licensed to sell, before Aflac let's you sell for them to make the commission? They just contacted me about working for them but with a 3 yr old, and a new baby on the way, I'm not sure if I can cut out up to a year without making money. But I like the prospects of doing what you are talking about!
0
Feb 4, 2016 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Highlighted
I went the Aflac route about 6 years ago. I stayed with them for about 8 months. I sold one account, a large one, however, the owner was hired by be in a previous job as a claims adjuster. The majority of contacts I made had already been contacted by an Aflac agent...sometimes within days! Someone got me a copy of the accounts with Aflac. The rest of my contacts were already Aflac accounts. One called the local KC office and asked not to send any more Aflac agents knocking. They had had enough. It can be fruitful, but you had better have a good supply of willing buyers that you know personally.
0
Oct 26, 2015 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
I would still avoid them like the plague. They have high rollover. What you want to ask for is their broker rollover rates, as well as an earnings disclosure for all the brokers in that specific location.

Under Fed law, when you ask for that information in any commission based job, they need to provide it.

If you are in retail management, I would recommend investing in a career coach to make a decision. Don't listen to the sales pitch that is designed to pump you up and open your wallet/invest your time.

I have worked on the brokerage side. AFLAC sells primarily supplemental/voluntary benefits. Most larger businesses are purchasing those products through their brokers who supply Comp/Health/General Liability/ etc. They usually get really good rates bundling it all together. So getting your foot in the door is going to be through your personal network and not so much door knocking as they would have you believe. Door knocking and cold calling are crap shoots given the way Commercial Insurance works. Your other route is to sell individual policies .. but to make a living at it, you would need to be selling a policy a day to people that are not already receiving similar packages through their day job and/or have the disposable income.
Highlighted
Hi...I just interviewed with AFLAC here in KC. How do you feel about the company now? What questions should I ask if I get a second interview? I have been in retail management, not direct sales, so am wary of pitfalls I may be missing.

Thanks!
0
Oct 26, 2015 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Wendell, if your friend is well documented, he can sue not only the DSC, but AFLAC Corporate. I read an article recently that AFLAC was in hot water with ethics violations. Sitting behind the "franchise" umbrella or claiming reps are "independent brokers" is not washing in the courts. The case I read about was a big loss to AFLAC because they did not track what the DCC's were doing (beyond the income they were generating) and that they did not protect a brokers relationship similar to what you describe.


Most reputable brokerages have a written defining point at where the broker has developed a "relationship" with a prospect. At that point, the broker enters the prospect information into a database for his working pipeline reports. If agent B was to try to enter in that company information, he would not be able to do so without the original agent logging in and agreeing to work the account together for a split commission. The problem with AFLAC that got them into that legal hotbed I read about is because they do not protect an agent's pipeline.
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
I am curious about purchasing the laptop/equipment you need to go to the different appointments to get your business going. I believe the computer and such is about $3000 (please someone correct me if I am wrong) My question is, is there some type of financing for this. Do they pull your credit for this or what not. What the procedure on this.?? Thanks!
Highlighted
I have been into the business about one month, have gotten my license and just started in the field this past week! One thing is for sure, this IS A BUSINESS, it's not put your 8 hours in and go home and forget the day! It is ongoing tedious work, not physically demanding, but work non the less! I was recently laid off after being a loyal employee for over 8 years and have been a blue collar worker ALL my life! I wanted to have an oppurtunity to never be dependant on an employer again and this was that opportunity! After all the years of physical labor, i believe this is much much harder! So if you think it's going to be a typical 9-5 job then you are going to be very disappointed, IT'S HARD WORK! As far as AFLAC goes, they have been very supportive and give you everything you need to succeed, afetr it's all said and done, IT'S UP TO YOU on whether you're successful or not! Remmember IT'S YOUR BUSINESS! Hope this helps!
Highlighted
I need to add that accounts that large are handled by a team, Aflac individual agents are told day in and out to focus on small businesses. The bread and butter is small accounts of less than 50 employees, and imagine the amount of work for just one person to close an account of more than that. They don't want a new rookie agent screwing things up for large accounts and they tell you explicitly not to walk into a business with more than 300. Small accounts are easier to close, and much easier to get appointments with anyhow. Your district or regional managers are already working on those and they are usually headquartered somewhere else. As an agent you service accounts, help with claims...ect. I don't feel bad about this lady's son, he obviously went somewhere he shouldn't have and messed up. Sure his feelings might have been hurt but it was his own fault.
Highlighted
AFLAC is a wonderful company to work with, I have only been an agent for about a six months and I love it. It does not take hundreds of dollars to become an agent. The only out of pocket expense I have incurred was the cost to actually take my state exam. I can tell you it all depends on your District and Regional Coordinators. Mine are amazing. They have went out of their way to make me successful.
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Okay, I'm going to say this just in case anyone has waded thru 1400 comments on the subject:

First off, I DO NOT work for AFLAC but I am a very experience sales person with over 20 years in sales. As for that profession, 100% commission sales jobs are very hard work and the first thing you need to understand is that there is no ceiling on the money you can make...but there's no floor, either. I have made as much as $8000 a month on a consistent basis but have also made as little as $200 a month at times. It goes with the territory.

Now, over the last two years I have been heavily recruited by AFLAC. I even went so far as to attend one of their so-called interviews, which is nothing more than a "RAH-RAH! session". You're there with 30 other people (market saturation) and all they do is tell you how great the company is and how much money you can make. That is NOT a good sign. A real interview is conducted in a professional setting one-on-one.

Because I have numerous years in sales I knew the right questions to ask and when I did so I was asked to stay after the meeting and have my questions answered then. That was Strike #2. The third strike was when the manager doing the "interview" could not answer a single one of the hard questions. I could tell that all he knew how to do was regurgitate what he was trained to say. Just as a side note, I saw on page 1 or 2 of this thread that a guy boasted that he had been promoted to DSC after only six months. That tells you that either the company has a high turn around or that they promote strictly on productivity and not on experience. I would strongly recommend that anyone considering a career in insurance sales check out a more traditional company.

All that being said, I do think that AFLAC has s good product and I wish I had had it when my wife was diagnosed with cancer. In short, it's a good product to invest in but not a good one to sell.
Highlighted
Highlighted
I signed on with Aflac yesterday. After a friend vehemently told be NOT to work for this company, I came to this site to read what others have experienced with this company. I have approached this being open to both the pros and cons. There are pros and cons to every business and what is written is someone else's subjective experience. It doesn't mean that their experience will be mine, we are all uniquely formed and experience life in our own unique fashion. Someone wiser than I said that nothing is neither good nor bad except our thinking makes it so. I also am seeing that the office one joins with may have a lot to do with one's experience of the business. It was either Earl Nightengale or Zig Ziglar who said something about the "books you read." I was impressed that the office book shelves held books by authors whom I admire and respect when it comes to motivation and leadership. As with any business, particularly independent contractor sales, there are costs involved. In the State of Ohio my test and license fees are minimal and the agency will pick up a third of that if I complete the introductory part within 10 days. I have not heard anything about a special and expensive laptop computer I will need. I will inquire about that. Overall, I see this product as a Godsend when people need it. Another friend had the insurance when she needed surgery. All her living expenses were covered while she was on her unpaid leave of absence. She has nothing but good things to say about Aflac and her Aflac agent. I wish I had had this coverage when my husband became ill and I was required to quit working and take care of him 24/7. As a result we lost everything. I see this as a way to help others, a ministry so to speak. Zig Ziglar said, "You will always get what you want when you see to it that others get what they want."
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
Highlighted
No they do not pay for a drivers license. As for a good idea of what is going on in your area, ask the regional (or whomever you are interviewing with) for the names of new associates out like 6 months... Or better yet, have them call you.... They'll give you a good idea of what to experience in your area..
Highlighted
I just want to get my feet wet to gain experience
is this a good choice? I don't plan on being there for the rest if my life
Can anyone tell me if the training good and should I go
Do they pay for you to get drivers licenses
0
Jul 31, 2014 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
You are very wrong on a couple of levels. I have close to 40 years in sales experience behind me, 4 of them being appointed with Aflac. Firstly, I have witnessed new hires work their keister off for 6 to 8 months believing, like the horse in George Orwell's "Animal Farm", that they just have to work harder. Some hang on for a year or more before they understand that you can't trust what most DSM and RSMs tell you.

It is my opinion that, in most cases, you need a ruthless detachment to new people in order to succeed at Aflac. Aflac is a people mill and most new hires do not see that coming a mile away, nor should they, unless they have already been victimized by one. There's a reason they hire non-insurance and non-sales experienced people. Experienced people almost immediately spot the B.S.

Secondly, a lie of omission is still a lie. "Intern in Herndon" has it right. What they don't tell you at recruitment time is that success at Aflac is dependent upon recruitment. You hire people to get access to their warm leads and take over the accounts when they leave. That is why managers carry a recruitment quota. Corporate understands this completely.

You can occasionally get lucky at cold calling for Aflac clients, but the odds of getting a good account this way are lower than your odds of hitting a jackpot in Vegas. It is certainly not a way to build a book you can live on in anything less than 5 to 7 years if ever. An individual needs to knock on more than 800 doors to get a lead and only about 1 in 10 leads close. Do the math. As a DSM with 7 or 8 agents coming the streets, you have a chance of covering those 800 doors in a week. As an individual you do not.

You are right about it being a sales job. But the sales job at Aflac is selling the new hires a dream so you can get access to their contacts as warm leads.
Highlighted
Highlighted
If you don't like working hard this wouldn't be a job for you. This is basically a sales job and any sales job is hard work. It's common sense. Most of you apparently don't have that. You seem to expect things to be handed to you. It sounds like this job was definitely not for any of you and you should have seen that coming a mile away and so should have AFLAC. I don't work for them but come one people, obviously you need some more work and life experience if you are whining about something like this. Good luck
0
Jun 12, 2014 Solution
Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
I'm going to be completely honest about this company. I think overall Aflac has a great product and I truly believe in it. The downfall is what they put their employees through. I was an intern and have truly learned from this experience. I was told that my resume was really impressive and that I would be a great fit and that Aflac likes to treat its interns like full time employees so that they can learn and get the full experience. What I found out once I started my internship is that not only does everyone get that pitch but they don't even look at your resume. What is really happening is a group of more sales employees are calling and trying to bring in as many interns and full time employees as they can because they actually make money from aflac if the person they recruited does well. For interns they told us to go through contacts that we had of business owners/ceos/cfos and so on. We were then told to say something a long the lines of... " I just wanted to get 10-15 minutes of your time to get your opinion on my internship/presentation and see if you could possibly steer my to people you may know that might benefit from what I will be doing". Pretty much they have their interns leverage their own personal contacts and try to get even more leads off of them. The more experienced employees take over the appointment and you just sit there looking like an idiot because almost every time the pitch is done the person says something like ,"I thought I was going to hear you give a presentation and then give you feedback. You don't get paid unless you land an enrollment and even then you are always splitting your commission with another person. You use your own gas to go anywhere and truly all the risk is on the employee. You are leveraging your contacts, your money and your time.
Highlighted
Highlighted
I love Aflac and think it is a GREAT company to work for. Our region makes sure you get proper training. Truthfully, all of those that say its a scam either 1) are too lazy to go out and cold call and do the proper things you have to do to SELL and make-things-happen or 2) got stuck with a "less than great" DSC, which in that case, is not your fault. IF you would rather a cushy job that you can sit and do nothing and get paid then no, outside sales in not for you, but if you don't mind working hard, the income potential is limitless. I know a lot of people personally that make a good 6 figures as an associate.


And as far as the cost... you aren't paying Aflac. You have to pay the state you live in to get your license. Here in Arkansas, it is only $117 and $22 for a bg check. Our RSC pays for the class and books herself.

It does take a certain calibar of person to be truly successful. Not everyone has what it takes.
Highlighted
By the way to "dribble" is to let fall drop by drop as with a liquid. "Drivel" is foolish or silly talk - just re-read what you wrote and you will see an excellent example of drivel.

I could not have said that better!!! LOL
Highlighted
First of all I am not anti-Aflac. I just oppose many of their hiring tactics and the way they ruthlessly churn through people with false promises.

Supplemental voluntary insurance is on the periphery of mainstream insurance products and you will never really learn insurance by focusing in that area. With more than 35 years industry experience, in addition to an insurance license (at one time in 48 states), I had a series 7, 63, 24 plus I was a Municipals and Options Principal. I was also a Financial Advisor with one of America's largest brokerage firms. Though I retired a couple of years ago, I have a pretty fair handle on what's out there.

For new people looking to build an insurance career, a good general brokerage or one of the big name companies is your best bet for gaining experience. They have legitimate industry training, support and a career path. Good companies however, do screen their hires and practice full disclosure.

I stand by my comments despite what the fantasy merchants, apparently such as yourself, like to peddle to unsuspecting and desperate people new to the industry. Of course some people make a living at Aflac, some people make a living at MLM,but the vast majority do not.

By the way to "dribble" is to let fall drop by drop as with a liquid. "Drivel" is foolish or silly talk - just re-read what you wrote and you will see an excellent example of drivel.
Highlighted