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Any Experience with Suspicious Recruiters?

Just recently got back to the job market in a many years, and poseded my resume in numerous websites. Now, I am getting bunch of calls from recruiters with heavy Indian accent with recruiting company names that I never heard of. Nothing wrong with an accent, but most technical recruiters I had dealt with, tend to have English communication skills rival that of a car salesman.(with no disrespect).

Some obviously have not even read my resume,and some even asked some inappropriate questions like my ethnicity(even when my name is clearly Chinese) or how long I lived in the US...

Is this some kind of new scam? Fishing personal data from online resumes, job sites, or Linkedin profiles? or some high volume recruitment company runs out of India?
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Just recently got back to the job market in a many years, and poseded my resume in numerous websites. Now, I am getting bunch of calls from recruiters with heavy Indian accent with recruiting company names that I never heard of. Nothing wrong with an accent, but most technical recruiters I had dealt with, tend to have English communication skills rival that of a car salesman.(with no disrespect).

Some obviously have not even read my resume,and some even asked some inappropriate questions like my ethnicity(even when my name is clearly Chinese) or how long I lived in the US...

Is this some kind of new scam? Fishing personal data from online resumes, job sites, or Linkedin profiles? or some high volume recruitment company runs out of India?
Jan 20, 2017 Solution by original poster
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Just recently got back to the job market in a many years, and poseded my resume in numerous websites. Now, I am getting bunch of calls from recruiters with heavy Indian accent with recruiting company names that I never heard of. Nothing wrong with an accent, but most technical recruiters I had dealt with, tend to have English communication skills rival that of a car salesman.(with no disrespect).

Some obviously have not even read my resume,and some even asked some inappropriate questions like my ethnicity(even when my name is clearly Chinese) or how long I lived in the US...

Is this some kind of new scam? Fishing personal data from online resumes, job sites, or Linkedin profiles? or some high volume recruitment company runs out of India?
Jan 20, 2017 Solution by original poster
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This is a scam! I have received many calls from recruiters out of state with Indian accents. Don't give them any information, also you may receive emails for jobs that have an hourly rate much higher than the going rate for that kind of job that they are offering for cashing a check that they may be sending you and you send them part of it back via Western Union and then discover that the check they gave you to cash is fake and it will bounce and you will be on the hook for a fee from your bank. Tell them that you just got an offer for a new job today and end the call. Same thing goes for posting your resume on Craigslist they reply with some kind of fake job.
Jan 20, 2017 Solution by original poster
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Its called Data Mining and its been around awhile. Personally, I don't recommend posting your resume online because you will be bombarded with this kind of nonsense. Very few legitimate companies seek out candidates this way. However, if you do: Do not put your street address on your resume. Put No Commission Sales Offers Please and No, will not relocate. That will cut down on some of it.
Jan 20, 2017 Solution by original poster
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REMOVE your resume from the internet completely!!! You are leaving yourself open to foolishness at best and criminal activity at worst.

Proper process:
- Research the company listed in the job ad. If no company name is provided SKIP that ad.

- After researching (don't trust the info in the job ad) company name, address, phone, email, etc. Call the company to ensure there are people working there.

- Ask if they ran the ad and if the position is still open.

- Ask the person you talk to at the company if they are an employee of said company. Some people will lie. Someone told me you that is illegal.

- If you don't get to talk with a live person DON'T send any information to that company. Some SCAMMERS set up fake answering systems just to make you think it is a real company.

- After, ONLY after, you've made sure it is a real company with a building and people working there should you send ANY information!
Jan 21, 2017 Solution by original poster
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Well I fell for this scam and not knowing gave personal information to them. I went to their email that I received from them and all those email that they sent to me to authorize representation disappeared out of my inbox. Luckily I was able to retrieve a sent email to one of their "recruiters" and threaten that they were a scam and I had contacted BBB and lifelock. The guy called back and said he was not a scam and the job he posted me for was still considering my resume. LIE! So what can I do now they have my personal info? I even contacted the federal government to file a claim but still getting the calls.
Jun 14, 2017 Solution by original poster
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VERY SUSPICIOUS, recruiters with heavy Indian accents, supposedly from companies named rebeille and damco sending emails that are identical in the body of email, talking about a position in Harman, as soon as i email them they call right back in like one min and ask about ur desired salary if you are gonna do W-2 filing and then wanted to know last four of social, residence and some other info, really suspicious.
Jul 28, 2017 Solution by original poster
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Me, too. I recently got back to the job market in many years... and get contacted by Indians! So WHY would a LEGITIMATE recruiter contact me about a job here in the Dallas area FROM INDIA? I don't even know who to trust anymore. ONE email I got, late at night, had NO company info, only a cellphone number for a "professional job interview" over the phone from a "National Senior Recruiter". And when I searched her photo on LinkedIn, it looked like a quick cellphone snap, instead of a professional-looking picture of a "National Senior Recruiter". I don't want to pass up a legit job opportunity, but so far, almost all are suspect.
Feb 12, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I was recently called by Jessica Rubin from Expert Hiring. I could barely understand her as she had a very heavy (possibly) Indian accent. Anyone ever get this same call? It seemed quite odd, to be honest. It left me with an uncomfortable feeling.
Mar 6, 2018 Solution by original poster
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My original post was not even close to representing the tactics of Indian recruiters. There is a much more sinister component to this scam. As many of you have commented, the H1B visa program invites foreign workers to apply for temporary employment in the United States. One requirement for the visa, is that foreign candidates should not displace a United States citizen with comparable skills.
Mar 6, 2018 Solution by original poster
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These Indian "recruiters" are farming identities, contacts and resumes of United States citizens, to prove to the Department of Labor (DOL) that they have done due diligence to first find United States citizens to fill open high technology positions.
Mar 6, 2018 Solution by original poster
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H1B visa reform is needed, this will be quite costly time consuming. Just imagine how much effort this will require. The DOL will require that all recruiting agencies prove they actually interviewed each qualified candidate, and show that each candidate was ranked, assuring qualified U.S. citizens are considered first. Unfortunately this process can also be scammed.
Mar 6, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I recently received a call from an employee of an American recruiting agency, call him Ray. They do placements for contract software developers in the financial services industry. His role is to prepare candidates for their interviews, including background about the employer, what questions to expect, corporate culture and general interview preparation. I asked why was there a requirement for a photo of myself holding a state issued ID.
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Mar 6, 2018 Solution by original poster
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The financial institution Ray had placed foreign workers at had discovered that hundreds of foreign workers, including temporary and full-time employees, had falsified their educational credentials, work experiences and professional references. The extent is not fully known, but there is evidence that these foreign candidates had a surrogate fill in for their technical phone screenings.
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Mar 6, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Indian recruiters are gaming the system for mostly selfish reasons. Though legitimate up front, the idea is to initiate and prove contacts with potential US Citizen candidates whom have unknowingly price themselves out of the position with a high rate. The Indian company knows the rate is low but gets the US Candidate to unknowingly price him or herself out of the range of the hiring company. That way they can go back and promote a foreign worker at a much cheaper rate with the promise of the foreign worker being immigrated and sponsored on a H1B.
It meets all the requirements of the H1B visa program to the actual hiring company. No viable candidates (US Citizens) are seemingly found so foreign workers are promoted and immigrated instead.
Meanwhile, US candidates whom are still looking for a job never really hears from the Indian recruiter again. That's why one of the first things they ask in the initial contact is what pay rate are you looking for. 😉 Beware!
Mar 28, 2018 Solution by original poster
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RecruitmentSpace.com is another one of these. They purport to be an 'executive staffing firm.' They even have a convincing website, and the main recruiter's LinkedIn looks legit. Until you start digging. Luckily, all I got conned out of was my resume.
Mar 30, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I came across this thread because after recruiting on government positions for the past 6 years, I never had to deal with fake candidates until switching to a commercial staffing firm. As much as the fake jobs are a problem, the fake candidates that we deal with are just as bad, and the motives are MUCH more sinister. Their goal is to fake it through the interview process either by being helped by a technical consultant and then get hired for a few months until they're eventually canned.

I will say this though, 95% of legitimate staffing companies still use the job boards (Monster, Careerbuilder, Dice, etc.) to find candidates. Recruiters are under ridiculous metrics to make a certain number of phone calls daily, usually over 50, and you can't do that on websites liked LinkedIn or Indeed. It's a broken and dated metric system but, keep in mind, staffing firms only care about money. At least the big ones do, and I spent 7 years at two of them.

My advice to tech candidates, if the person calling you has a foreign accent, hang up the phone. Call me racist or ignorant, but this is just realistic. They are data mining as another user mentioned. That said, the only way to get contacted by legit recruiters is to either apply to jobs or post your resume on these job boards, and weed out all the BS foreign companies that are mining.
Apr 4, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I get calls all the time from people with heavy Indian accents regarding my resume they found on a “Job portal". Sometimes I get 3 different companies calling me for the same position. Always “contract on W-2." And they are ALWAYS calling me from IT recruiting companies...about executive assistant positions (my field). I thought it was because they searched key words, and one of them in my resume is “program".

After reading about job scams, I have the following questions:

1. Is it safe to assume these Indian people are ALL scammers? I’m not racist (foreigners who legally reside in the US have to earn a living too), but I get so many calls from them!
2. Should I set my resume to “private" on ALL job Boards like Indeed, Careerbuilder, LinkedIn?

Please note that I have been contacted by legitimate agencies that are local that have seen my resume...and I have gotten jobs that way...so I’m almost afraid NOT to make my resume private. It’s like a Catch-22.

Thanks in advance for any responses.
Apr 9, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I was also VERY skeptical of any recruiters from India... but then I got a good job through one of them! Seriously, I did, and I'm not a paid shill or fraud, and the job is truly legitimate. I was very surprised that recruiter turned out to be real, but she was. So don't make the mistake of assuming they're ALL crooks, although I am sure some of them are, or you might miss a good job. Just be careful with your info, and DON'T give out your social security# when filling out online job applications.
Apr 9, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Thanks for your response. I actually did go on an interview once that was legit through one of them.

However, one time a guy actually told me that before I went on one interview that it was “required" they (the prospective employer) know certain info (it may have been a picture of my Passport or SS#...I cant remember which). At that point, I told him that I hadn’t even gone on the interview yet and there was no reason for it. When I told him I wasn’t falling for the scam, he stopped communicating.

I also don’t like getting multiple emails regarding the same job from “different companies." One time I even got three emails from three different people for the same job...and they were all working for the same recruiter!
Apr 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Someone sent me a message on LinkedIn last February. They worked for BCS Solutions and had a contract job in my area. I looked up the name and it seemed legit. I told her I was interested in learning more. She called and I let it go to voicemail because I was busy at work. I called her back and when I gave her my name, she acted like she had no idea who I was. In addition I mentioned the position that was located in a small city in Wisconsin, and she asks "which one."

Right away I had an uneasy feeling, or I just felt this person was incompetent, as almost anyone who has ever called me regarding a job I applied for, knows who I am when I give my name. Anywho, she asks me questions about what I do for my job and also my social security number. I just said I didn't know it because that's a big red flag. She then asks me to redo my job description because the business is looking for someone with "x" experience and skills. I told her there isn't anymore to my job as I said everything I do.

After the weekend I send her an email that I was withdrawing my application and looking elsewhere for jobs. 6 months later, this woman emails me about a job in my area, a bilingual job. I laughed SO hard when I read that email and just deleted it right away.
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Apr 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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It's definitely a Catch-22. 90% of recruiters do use keyword boolean searches, legit or not. Inevitably, you will get quite a few scammers but you'll also definitely get some legitimate calls as well.

And no, not all Indian recruiters are scammers. Many of these Indian recruiters work for offshore companies that can't establish relationships with end clients like Cisco, Google, Apple, etc. So instead, they recruit people and then "vend" them to onshore, well known staffing firms like Tek Systems, Insight Global, Apex, etc. and skim $5-10 off of the rate. If they're located in a poor country, that's a huge profit margin for them and they basically are being paid to refer the candidate to another staffing firm. That said, the more layers you add, the more money must be shared which can affect your pay rate. I've even seen 4+ parties involved, for example: Offshore company X finds candidate for $50/hr, markets candidate to Offshore company Y at $55/hr, offshore company Y markets candidate to onshore company X at $65/hr, onshore company X markets candidate at $70-80/hr to the end client.

So the bottom line is, if you want to make the highest rate, try to go directly to the onshore staffing firm. Many people think that going around the staffing company will make them more money, but that almost always backfires for a few reasons. One, candidates constantly slip through the cracks when being reviewed by HR, because 90% of the applicants are fake or not qualified. Two, it's often cheaper for end clients to use contractors than bring them on perm, so often times the position isn't even available for full-time employment initially.

I would say always make your resume public and sift through the fake recruiters, just like recruiters sift through fake candidates. Otherwise, how is a legitimate recruiter going to find your resume if they can't read it?
Apr 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Your contact information including phone number and address stay private on your indeed and LinkedIn until you apply for the job. Applying means you share it with that employer.
My suggestion is keep your profile updated and public(your contact stay private).
Don't enter your contact informations anywhere except the appropriate field.
Apr 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Companies ask for your last 4 digits of social security when they have the full number.
I had a call from a indian guy who called me to see if I'm interested on the position. I said yes and he come up with more questions and salary and hourly rate. I gave them all that he ask for last 4 digits of my social security.
I asked why you need that and what you gonna do with that partial numbers? He said he wanna duplicate it with ...
I said no and hang-up the call.
He sent me an email for salary confirmation. I checked their website and there no physical address or phone number.
Simply ignore them.
This was a case of scammers who had my contacts and wants my social. Even with last4 digits they can sneak to my online account by the data that they have and resetting my passwords.
Apr 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Thanks everyone. You all provided great information.

I tend to ignore phone calls from numbers I do not know anyway. I let them go to voice mail. If I cannot understand the person, I just delete the voicemail. Most times, they follow up with an email anyway. Every once in a while, I do speak with them. I had one person get an "attitude" with me when I asked him very politely a few times to repeat himself because I could not understand him. On him, I just hung up. I figure that he's working for me just as much as I would for him, so why get an attitude?

Regarding "going directly to the onshore staffing firm," do you mean the company that is in their signature in their email? I always get tech firms for some reason...Sunrise Systems, Mindlance, Cyberthink, US Tech Solutions, Inc., etc.

These people are trying to be sneaky by calling you from a New Jersey phone number. However, when you speak with them, they have absolutely no idea where in New Jersey I live. That is one giveaway. Another is that many times, when they believe they have hung up the phone after leaving a voicemail, they have not. I can hear the background noise. It's like one big telemarketing firm.

Regarding the last four digits of a social security - very good info. I know that many credit card companies (when I call) ask me for that info, but I am calling them, and I know that they are trying to verify that it IS actually me calling them.

Giving the birthday (month/day) - does that actually cause a problem, or no? Like I said before, that is very public information.

And yes, I thought making it public WOULD allow someone to find you. I have gotten many contract jobs this way. However, they are local recruiters. I go through my inbox daily and apply for posted jobs. Everything else I just delete a ton of spam in one shot. It can be a pain, but in the end, I guess it can be worth it if someone does find you for a real job.

Again, thanks all for your comments.
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Apr 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I am getting hounded by a fake recruiting company calling themselves "employment specialists" and also a fake "college placement" service and they are asking me some pretty obvious questions like "What is your date of birth" and "What year did you graduate from High School?". Sadly, there are people out there that are going to be caught off guard and are going to give these guys this information because these scam artists are pretty convincing on the phone. So please be aware. I haven't seen a lot of information out there about these scams, but they are hounding me constantly. I think they must have got my info from Indeed or something. They use a different phone number each time and it is always the same area code as mine. I got an app to try to block them called "Should I answer" but it doesn't work because they use a different number each time. I wish there was a way to report them. I think I am going to take my phone number off my online resume so recruiters can contact me by email.
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Apr 26, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I'm in the job hunt myself and am getting bombarded with opportunities from Indian recruiters. The grammar and English isn't all there which leads me to believe their generic responses aren't thoroughly put together. It does seem like a scam and I've been more careful about providing them any information. If I'm going to work with a recruiter, it has to be from a legit organization. It is a shame that job postings can't list who the recruiter is all the time to help weed out potential spammers.
May 4, 2018 Solution by original poster
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The ones that are bombarding me with phone calls have American accents. And they always call me from the same area code as my phone but a different number each time. As soon as I start asking questions about there organization, they hang up on me. I have finally stopped answering phone calls from my area code that I don't recognize because it is always from these two scammers almost every other day. I would change my number, but I have had this number for years and I have a lot of business contacts that use it. It is really annoying and I hope they lose interest.
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May 4, 2018 Solution by original poster
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The people calling from similar numbers to you aren’t just recruiters. They can be anyone who is trying a scam (or even a legit caller). I never answer any calls from numbers I don’t recognize. I let them go to voicemail. If they want me, they’ll leave a message letting me know who they are, and I can decide whether or not I want to return their call. Mostly all of the ones who are not recruiters never leave a voicemail (I then block the call...but as you said, they then call from a different number, so it’s an annoyance).. However, some of the scam recruiters leave a voicemail...and that’s when you need to be be careful with the info you share.
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May 4, 2018 Solution by original poster
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This certain process must be stopped! There are way too many fake recruiters online that pretend to send you job opportunities just to get personal info out of the prospect/candidate. Especially having a traditional south asian name, my profile gets tracked even more and bombarded with spam emails by the indian scam recruiters. I am absolutely tired of blocking them, they will not stop and come back around with a. different alias.

Only job boards like Indeed, Monster etc. should definitely have a filter system to block the this horrible new way of recruiting, that is giving "Recruiting" as a career a bad name.
May 9, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Can you imagine how desperate you look to an employer when their inbox is crammed with 20 copies of your resume. India recruiters make me crazy, one of em kept hounding me over the phone and i was so pissed i went off on him, it was an actual american employer, my bad after chain calls you lose it, these parisites need to be stopped, period.if i dont get employed soon ima have to steal or sell drugs, and im a homeless dev, jus tryin to hold on sleepin in my car, got 10$ left and 2 weeks, then im totally outdoors with no job,phone or hope, might as well die.
May 9, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Please...do not feel that way. You will get a job. Try even going to a store and get a job paying less money than you are used to. Lots of stores are advertising that they are hiring. In 2013, that's what I had to do in order to make the mortgage payment, get food, etc. I know how tough it is...I've been there. Good luck!

On the bright side (if there is one), no recruiter is allowed to send your resume to an employer without your consent, so employers do not have multiple copies of your resume. I found out that if an employer receives multiple resumes for the same person, that person is automatically disqualified from being considered. Recruiters know this. That is why they are very careful to make sure you consent and that you agree to only work with them and not to work with anyone else asking for you to apply to the same position. This goes for working with any recruiter - legit or not. You only want your resume to go to the employer one time.

Also, do not think that you may have a better chance of getting an interview if you circumvent the system and apply on your own. Once you agree to work with a recruiter, work only with that person and do not apply on your own (again, this disqualifies your resume).

I get bombarded with emails from recruiters regarding the same position. If I do decide to work with one (some are legit), I look at all of the emails regarding the same job. I then decide which one to work with based on the salary that is proposed. This is also tricky because many times, they come back and say, "Oh, I just found out the employer can only pay such and such." At that point, I will say "You do NOT have my permission to send my resume."

Regarding asking for your birthday - you are correct. They will ask for month and day only. Then, later on, they will ask when you graduated. This will help them put "2 and 2 together" in order to get your full birthdate. I never tell them as it implies my age, which is illegal.
May 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Hey Folks,

Wanted to chime back in here for you all as there seems to be a lot of questions and confusion out there. First off, Lisa1129 is correct and that no recruiter is allowed to send your resume without your consent. Unfortunately, the sketchy ones do it anyway...and I see it all of the time. I can't count the number of times I've asked a candidate if they've been submitted to a certain position or even client, have them say "no," and then when I submit them I get a response from the hiring manager stating he's already seen the resume. That why we always have our candidates sign or at least respond with email consent to a Right-to-Represent.

Regarding the SSN question, I too would always be hesitant to give out that information, especially the full number. That said, many large companies (like Wells Fargo, Duke Energy, etc) funnel all hiring through what's called a VMS (Vendor Management System). It's an online portal (like Fieldglass) that lists all the positions to an approved list of vendors. The vendors then submit their candidates through the portal, and many of these VMS systems (including Wells Fargo) require us to fill out a candidate profile. Part of that profile is the last 4 digits of the candidate's SSN, and it's mandatory in order to click the "submit" button. So if a recruiter is asking for that info, this should be the ONLY legitimate reason that they need it. So be sure to ask them WHY they need it and if it's any other answer, DON'T provide it until later in the process, like after you receive and accept an offer.
May 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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OK, back to Lisa's questions. What I mean by going through the onshore staffing firm is: do your research to make sure the company is based in the United States. They should also have an office in the area of where the CLIENT is located (not necessarily the job location, as an example, we fill data center technician positions in Boise, ID but the hiring manager sits in San Francisco, which is where we are HQ'd).

Also, although we're HQ'd in San Fran and that's where most of our recruiters sit, I'm one of our only remote recruiters and I sit at home in Charleston, SC. I use a VOIP phone which has a San Francisco phone number, but I'm not the most knowledgeable on the geography there. So usually I'll just explain that at the beginning of the call so no one is alarmed when they realize I don't know the area, commute times, etc.
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May 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Regarding the birthday, I only ask for that information when I'm filling out onboarding paperwork...I can't remember if it's needed for most VMS systems...sorry folks.

Regarding this: "If they want me, they’ll leave a message letting me know who they are, and I can decide whether or not I want to return their call." - that's 100% true. Myself and any good recruiter will always leave a voicemail and likely a follow-up email.

Lastly, here's some more advice. Try to find 2-3 recruiters you can really know and trust, go with your gut. I have a handful of candidates that tell me they will ONLY work with me. While it's flattering and makes me happy to know that I will likely be the one to place them, it's also not fair to the candidate to do that, which is why I never ask them to. I actually encourage them to work with as many good recruiters as they can find. Here's why: I used to work for TekSystems, a HUGE IT staffing firm. We would have between 100-200 active openings at any given time in large metro cities. That means if a candidate calls in, I could look at our white boards (or electronic job boards nowadays) and see EVERY opening we have and if they could be a fit. I now work for a company of around 150 employees, and because we don't have nearly as many sales people, we only have 10-20 openings at any given time. So if a candidate calls in, there's a much lower chance that I will have a fitting job for them versus a much higher chance when I worked at Tek. So, the point is, work with as many recruiters as possible and keep track of where you've been submitted at all times, in order to avoid double submissions.

I'm happy to field any other questions, but being a recruiter, I am SUPER BUSY (many are held to a certain number of phone calls per day and very micromanaged), so I'll try to answer within a reasonable time frame.
May 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I decided to keep my resume public because there are good legitimate recruiters out there. Because I am back in the job market again just based on my last experience that is how the previous recruiter found me and placed me. Now considering the Indian recruiters seemed to be based in NJ, Northern CA, and Texas I do not take calls from them. I know they are not legitimate based on the job description they send via email because they tell you how their client is. Any qualified recruiter will never tell you who their client is unless they are ready to set up an interview. Concerning dealing with Indian recruiters what I do is block their calls on my cell phone because of the way my VOIP is set up it blocks them on my landline too. This guy this morning tried 5 times to call me.
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May 21, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Actually, I did get a legit interview through one of those recruiters. They told me the client in the first email. It was a legit interview.

You just need to be leery. Especially if you get multiple emails from different recruiters, and they are basically all using the same template.
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May 21, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I fully agree with what you said. They are fishing information and what they will do is anybody's guess. The best way to deal with is flag their email as "fishing scam". This way you will see their email and over a period of time, the response they get will start to diminish.
I recently applied for a job for a client in New York. The CIO is an Indian. My application got rejected right away. Later I found out that, he has his buddies being hired and also, he is teaming up with an Indian IT company. We need to speak out and rid USA of this menace
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Aug 28, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Lets say we leave our information on a site like indeed. Shouldnt it be up to Indeed to not allow our information into the hands of these scammers? How is our information that is posted to a job that we find on indeed getting into the hands of these scammers? Its just best to leave all your personal info off the internet.
Aug 29, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I'm back in the market as well. I work with many international employees and know that many positions have been outsourced. I am not uncomfortable with this and I found a position from a third-party company some years ago. This company is American (I think... [Virtual Vocations]) and charged a fee (much like FlexJobs.com). The HR person who hired me had a fit. With all the postings she made for my position, she was angry that I found out about the position on a site that she did not contact.

I'm just really confused...
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Sep 4, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I'm absolutely tired and disgusted by these fake recruiters who are profiling my name and reaching out to me like I would respond to them just because we are from the same ethnicity. These indian recruiting agencies are not to be trusted at all. Phone Numbers are usually outsourced from New Jersey area.
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Sep 10, 2018 Solution by original poster
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Those freaking fake recruiters do fish information and screen their countrymen Indians out and push them for possible hire to potential employers. Once those are hired, they return the favour by providing information to the outsourcing companies and get a percentage out of this service. It is a big scam that need to be exposed and dealt with.
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Sep 14, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I've been dealing with this as a programmer for the last 3 years. When I update my resume it gets to the point where I can't use my phone and I get 10-20 emails from fake recruiters every day. I caught on after a month or two that the majority of these recruiters are fake and started to screen calls, but was optimistic for about 6 months and would listen to what they had to say before writing them off as scammers. One of these people actually got me an interview at Peak 10 here in Charlotte in 2016. I worked 3rd shift 4 hours away from their office at the time and the recruiter said they would only interview at 11 AM on Wednesday.
So I drove up to Charlotte the next day after working a 12 hour shift, with no sleep, got to the place where the recruiter said she would meet me to find out that the recruiter lived in India and had no idea where I should go. So here I am at peak 10s office, with only an off shore recruiter to talk to and no directions on where to go. 10 minutes later an employee let me in their building and helped me find out where I was supposed to go. The interview went awful, because I was so exhausted and I didn't get the job. After this incident I decided to ignore all Indian recruiters.
Oct 18, 2018 Solution by original poster
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I'm sorry you had such a rough time, I would have been cussing a streak! But don't throw out ALL Indian recruiters because of them. I know for a fact JP Morgan Chase DOES use recruiters from India, so they aren't all cons.
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Oct 18, 2018 Solution by original poster
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