Average typing speed

Today I came across a posting that requires a minimum type speed of 85 wpm. How many people can type that fast? Responding to daily emails gives everyone typing practice, but If I can type 60 wpm I am lucky, is this setting the bar too high?
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Today I came across a posting that requires a minimum type speed of 85 wpm. How many people can type that fast? Responding to daily emails gives everyone typing practice, but If I can type 60 wpm I am lucky, is this setting the bar too high?
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Today I came across a posting that requires a minimum type speed of 85 wpm. How many people can type that fast? Responding to daily emails gives everyone typing practice, but If I can type 60 wpm I am lucky, is this setting the bar too high?
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I've taken typing tests where I've gotten up to 110 wpm. My normal speed is usually between 90-100. I credit all those typing exercises I had to do in middle school as being the reason. I did always find these job requirements related to typing speed to be bizarre since you do get typing practice from a lot of these jobs anyway.
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The only people that really can type that fast are people who have to type of all those legal document and do a ton of typing on the job. Many jobs don't send letters by mail anymore, and you don't have to type that fast to send off a quick email reply. Some employers want advanced degrees, and 10 years experience and willing to pay peanuts for it. How is a new college grad going to get a start in the working world with the bar set that high?
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i recently saw a job that wants 100+wpm, wonder whats the point of it.
the advanced degree requirement is usually for very specific jobs, like STEM jobs, which would require the degrees. The most annoying part about stem degrees, is that in undergrad you are never advised on job search after college. after you get a degree, these jobs expect you to pull 2-5 years experience, for an entry level position.
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I don't think that they should require a typing speed when considering candidates for a job. The documents that they will be typing, can the candidate do them? Letters, accurately, emails don't require 100 wpm skills as many are not that long. How many jobs are people typing all day long? You begin to wonder is this a real job with the requirements so high? I have not had a single company test my typing speed to be considered for the job. Yes temp agencies sometimes do, but I will not work with them as they will send you on something that you might not be the perfect match, but they have to beat the other agencies that might also be sending candidates for that opening. Same thing goes for Word, Excel & Outlook, yes they are part of the job I do, but never once was I tested and was hired. If they did test me on them I know enough to do the job that I am applying for.
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Hello guys! I have decided to visit this thread, because I am also interested in the topic about the typing rate test www.typingrates.com/. To be honest, it is not so easy to find some information or some help about this issue in the internet and that is why it is necessary to look for any help in the internet for a long time and according to my experience, even if you will find some services, you will need to order it and of course to pay for it, because I have not found such a services for free. Do you agree?
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I recently got a job in data entry where we have to fill in forms from one form into another (split screen) I saw a guy who had to be at 100+ wpm. I dont' know how he was doing it without mistakes because how you can you even read the document and fill it in at the same time? It's crazy. That is where I would think someone would want every one of their workers at 100+ because if you had 100 people in a center all typing like him work would be flying out the door.

I give a side eye when regular office jobs like a secretary or receptionist or clerk ask for 85 wpm and up. Makes me wonder what they will have you doing. Maybe a secretary will be doing dictation or taking minutes or something, but still you don't need to type that fast for that. I always feel like they assume the faster you can type the more work they can pile on you and expect it done in the half the time. Even if I could type that fast I don't want to be typing like some maniac for 8-9 hours a day.
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Only jobs I can think of are straight up, high volume, data entry jobs, especially 10 key, that might really require such a high KSPH or WPM. I've heard that 911 dispatchers need high typing speed, 80+, but I would think a lot of that information can be obtained by tracing the call.
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Typing speed is something that depends on a huge number of different factors. A type of a keyboard, an experience gained, a frequency of typing and so on and so forth - everything of that is important. And, in addition to this, a typing speed could be proved without any difficulties and in the short time. The only way to do that is to practice, practice and practice. The average typing speed could be different: from 38 to 42 words per minute, and for professional typists that is from 65 to 75 words per minutes. Oh, also it is a good idea to use typing speed test for proving skills.
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I find many of these opinions rather shocking! 85wpm is a problem to someone applying to be a secretary or receptionist!? WELL... I guess that's why a lot of these companies require tests!


You can easily find the consensus on the "AVERAGE" typing speed which is between 38 to 41wpm. But the "average" person in the world doesn't have a high-school equivalent education and nearly half the population of the world doesn't even have their own computer. PS: A 6th grader in north American schools is required to hit 30wpm. So, the average means you're only 25% better than a 6th grader?! Common... no. Don't judge yourself by the average or by 6th graders!


For nearly every other job that requires sitting at a desk but isn't strictly data entry, people aren't asked to take typing tests because frankly it's assumed you can type faster than a 6th grader by a wide margin, not because it doesn't matter. Also, if you can't type fast, it's likely you have other issues that will weed you out for jobs in the Finance, IT, Accounting and a dozen other areas. ie. No need for a test. Again, not because it doesn't matter so don't assume it doesn't.


I have only worked with one person who couldn't type worth a crap in the IT industry. Happened to be my boss and I remember one day a VP watching him type, openly giving him crap about it in a room of a people. Not sure what he did to fix it, but a few months later he was banging away at a normal 60-70wpm or more.
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I guess I'll add my 2 cents. I just landed my first data entry job, as all my other positions in life have been teaching at various universities in China/Property Management/Restaurant Management. Whenever my students saw me type, they always were in awe at how fast I typed. Anyways, I type over 100 WPM. How? Some of you may have heard of the game--Everquest. When I was in high school, I spent every night running an online MMORPG guild in the game. It required me to be able to type fast, because I would be bombarded by questions constantly. Thats the way I learned to type fast. I was also taking a typing class at the time and was hitting 90 WPM. I've managed to increase it 20 WPM since then and now type over 100 WPM. When I applied for the Data Entry job, it required at least 60 WPM. When I scored over 100 WPM, the 3rd party HR company told me I was hired on the spot as there was no way they'd not hire me. Anyways, you don't have to run an online MMORPG to increase your typing speed. But obviously running that guild gave me practice doing something I enjoyed doing, and practice is what will increase your typing speed. Good luck!
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Honestly, I agree with this comment so much. I am going into seventh grade and I have passed a typing test with 115 WPM before, so it is kind of surprising to me that someone that is old enough to be applying for a job has a tough time with 85 words per minute. Then again, the typing test I took when I got 115 WPM was pretty short and had easy words like something and someone which are much easier to type than others.

Still though, I average around 80-85 words per minute and just yesterday was able to hit 112. I think that your typing speed by the time you are graduating and looking for a job should be around at lest 85, so to be honest I am surprised that people who have to type much more than others in their job are worried about typing that fast.
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Aug 7, 2018 Solution
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Actually, there are quite a lot of specialists, who can type with that speed and even faster. I think, it is all because of the skill of blind typing, and when you know what to write, it is not so difficult to enlarge your www.retype.biz/typing-speed-facts-you-will-be-impressed/ typing speed to even 150 wpm. What about accuracy, the last versions of word do the automatic correction in most cases, and don’t forget about that fact that people can type on the phone and that is even easier and faster than typing on pc or laptop. And the autocorrection is much better than word’s one.
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Aug 16, 2018 Solution
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Actually, there are quite a lot of specialists, who can type with that speed and even faster. I think, it is all because of the skill of blind typing, and when you know what to write, it is not so difficult to enlarge your [www.retype.biz/typing-speed-facts-you-will-be-impressed/=typing speed] to even 150 wpm. What about accuracy, the last versions of word do the automatic correction in most cases, and don’t forget about that fact that people can type on the phone and that is even easier and faster than typing on pc or laptop. And the autocorrection is much better than word’s one.
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Aug 16, 2018 Solution
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Let me baby this down for all you nice nerds flocking here. All you have to do is pretty much stick with typing, practicing, and all that good stuff. I mean I'm a sophomore with 100 wpm average and I still know people who type the same/faster than me, younger and (obviously) older. You basically have to just keep practicing, more than just emails too (typing lessons) and you'll get faster eventually. However, this comes at a cost, as you need to learn how to type fast and be ACCURATE (something I am working on right now, accuracy is around 97-99%). From experience and multiple talks from family members, friends, and people seeking employers, having any errors at all while you're typing is a complete turn off. Such as someone typing 110 with 0 errors, and someone typing 113 with an error, they WILL take the person with no errors just to be safe.

Also, multiple factors like someone said previously in this forum do affect your typing. The type of keyboard, computer, laptop, posture, time of day, your attitude, and much more are all factors of what you input. Some days I get a little sluggish and find myself running at around 90-95 wpm, but it keeps improving from the amount of time you take interest in typing.

Also, no I don't stalk this website. I just randomly found it when looking up things about typing.
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I was a transcriptionist for decades as well, even wiped out all the radiology in a large med/surg hospital in one day once (gotta love incentive bonuses), and we were highly QAed for accuracy. My guess is I type at a rate of approximately 75-90 wpm accurately (ear-to-hand better than eye-to-hand), depending on complexity. In college, I HAD to type 60 wpm with 3 errors or less to get out of a class. So I was not concerned at all about a typing test, but the Indeed typing test said I typed at 48 wpm. What?!!! I was floored, and the result has my friends laughing hysterically because I can out-type just about everyone. Really odd.
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I can easily knock out 100-110wpm if I type my own way (chicken pecking lol), but if I type the proper way it's really only 60-70wpm. These totals include No Typos. What difference is a high count if it's full of typos?

My own way is a mixture of the proper way and chicken pecking. It also helps if I'm interested in what I have to type out.
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My typing teacher could type over 100 wpm. I had a data entry job and saw a guy easily typing 150+ and it had to be without typos because he was always high ranking and then got promoted. I used to watch him in disbelief. He was also typing numbers on the keypad at the same time. I can do 65 if I'm really trying but I don't want to type that fast. About 40 is good for me.
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I wish I was a faster typist. I type about 40 wpm, which I guess is average. But many places expect people to type faster than that.

I actually wanted to take typing in middle school, but my dad wouldn’t let me. He insisted that I take something more “intellectual." Not the greatest advice. I may have a lot of knowledge, but I don’t know about my skills.

I’m surprised to hear that 6th graders have to type 30 wpm! Times have changed, if that’s true. When I was in 6th grade, nobody in my class knew how to type. Nobody had computers back then, so that’s probably why.

How can a person improve their typing speed? Are there any online exercises out there that are free?
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I was always around 45 wpm in junior high and high school. Now my top speed is btw 70-75.

My speed increased with a "Mavis Beacon" typing tutor program on my computer. My very old computer went out last year, so now I have a cheap, new one. I have to look into getting another typing tutor for this computer.
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I regularly type 90+ WPM, and I was taking minutes for a series of meetings that needed to be extremely detailed (notating specific building requirements for blast loads, etc.) and I was struggling. Let me tell you, keyboard shortcuts like CTRL+BACKSPACE certainly helped, even with my average typing speed.
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I've worked in Human Resources and it was fairly common to have candidates that could type 100wpm and more. The majority of the time, these people had worked in a legal transcription role and really, that particular field is the only one I ever saw that demanded a quicker than average typing speed. Most employers find 55wpm to be an acceptable speed.
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At my middle and high school, you were never required to learn to type and only a small percentage of kids actually took the class. Most people did not know how to type and I think that set them. I have 110 wpm just because I used to type for our local newspaper. If you have the right qualification but a pretty average typing speed, they are likely to hire you unless you have career as a typist or something similar.
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Dec 12, 2019 Solution
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For those of us who learned on a manual typewriter, I think 70wpm would be the norm. But that was a time when you learned typing by touch (no letters on the keys). I used to type about 100, but that was on a regular keyboard.

I think 85wpm is unrealistic--are they also wanting someone who knows shorthand??
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Dec 12, 2019 Solution
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Typing is a skill that can be worked upon just like shooting a basketball and if you want to play at a certain level, you will have to make sure your abilities are up to par. The good thing with typing is that with consistent practice, you'll gradually improve. There are a wide variety of options online that can assist you in your training, regardless of any budget. Integrating more methods of typing, along with answering emails, is a good strategy towards developing your skill further. Good luck!

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Feb 16, 2020 Solution
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great tip @AML_TX  

I learned to type in High School and while i've never had a job that asked about my typing skills, I do think the best thing to do is to learn the keyboard shortcuts and to practice! practice! practice!  It's really about repetition.  

There are several types of jobs that require you to type quickly, which can land anywhere above 60wpm.  The preference of 85+ wpm means you're likely doing some very heavy typing and that speed is of the essence.   Additionally, depending on the type of job, some companies pay will pay by audio minute or per word so it would be in your best interest to type as quickly and accurately as possible.  Below are some jobs you may want to consider according to Typing Lounge. 

1. Typist or Word Processor
2. Transcriptionist
3. Legal Transcriber
4. Data Entry Specialist
5. Closed Captioning and Subtitling Typing
6. Court Reporter
7. Journalist/Writer
8. Secretary/Personal Assistant
9. Virtual Assistant
10. Translator
11. Web Designer/Developer
12. Chat Agent

 
To Your Success! 
~ Coach Chantél, Job Search Guide

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Mar 18, 2020 Solution
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@Eva14 

 

To tag on to what @WKiser mentioned, you might want to start with classical! Classical has been proven to be one of the most helpful music genres for concentration. In general, music without lyrics will help the most (most likely). 

 

You could also practice with typing games like Mavis Beacon. There are all sorts of free typing games that make sharpening your typing skills fun! 

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Mar 24, 2020 Solution
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Hi @Holly9,

There are jobs that require a type speed of 85 wpm or even higher, this is dependent on the type of job of course. For jobs such as data entry, dispatch, medical transcripts, legal assistants etc. it is important that the employee responsible for reporting is able to capture important information accurately. For example, it is reported that a court reporter needs to be able to type incredibly fast, about 225 wpm, although they use special machines that are designed to help them achieve this numerical and additional training. Again, wpm requirements is dependent on the type of job so you may find jobs like, CNAs or phlebotomists, for example, only need to be able to type between 25 wpm and 40wpm. Regardless, a higher wpm speed is always an advantage in the workplace. 😊  Hope this information is helpful. 

Best of luck, 

Leticia 

 

 

 

 

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Mar 24, 2020 Solution
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Be sure to use all ten fingers: No finger should be idle unless you are typing an article that does not have specific letters assigned to specific fingers. It is recommended that the fingers are anchored on the home keys so they can easily reach the rest of the keys. The left pinky, ring, middle, and index fingers are anchored to the A, S, D, and F keys respectively. The right set of fingers, on the other hand, are for the letters J, K, L, and ;. Some keyboards provide small but easily felt bumps for the letters F and J so you can quickly locate these keys by simply touching them. Once you position your index fingers on their respective home keys, you can easily position the rest of your fingers to their respective home keys. This becomes much more intuitive the more you practice.

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Mar 27, 2020 Solution
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If you're starting off at 60 wpm, I say you're in a good place. Jobs that announce the desired typing speed are more than likely going to be typing intensive, so you should think to yourself "Is this the job for me" especially if you are not at the speed yet.

If you are still interested in applying to the job, and you get the job, your typing speed will surely improve over time after churning out 1000 emails and more in shorter periods of time. 

The job description is setting an expectation before you consider that job. If you are not there yet, I say you can still apply, however you'll want to leverage a few online resources that are free and will help improve your typing speed in a short period of time with practice.

Over time, you may consider positions that require 100 wpm or more!

Good luck!

Monique Davis, Career Coach

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Mar 31, 2020 Solution
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For anyone looking to improve their typing speed during this time. Take advantage of online courses that allow you to practice using all ten fingers as mentioned above. Perhaps you want to partner with someone who has the same goal of increasing their typing speed. You can play typing games to add a little competition to the mix. Lastly, the best way to practice everything is just to do it. Forming actual thoughts rather than just completing computer-generated phrases will help you build this competency. Type out a few paragraphs a day about anything you can think of. Take every opportunity to practice, when you're typing an email and when you're chatting online. Test your self periodically to see how your speed has improved. This could certainly be a fun project to conquer.

 

-Monique Davis, Career Coach

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Apr 15, 2020 Solution
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