Is it better to have a job lined up before moving to another state

Fiancé wants to move down to Florida when she finishes vocational nursing school in the end of 2016.

I am interested in Texas so bit of deciding to do.

However, were planning on trying to save money up until were ready to move.

Feel be easier to land a job once we move. Any feedback, coming from Conneticut, it's a good 1,000 miles. Any tips on how to move to a different state? How do you interview for job's being far away?

Appreciate any feedback.
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Fiancé wants to move down to Florida when she finishes vocational nursing school in the end of 2016.

I am interested in Texas so bit of deciding to do.

However, were planning on trying to save money up until were ready to move.

Feel be easier to land a job once we move. Any feedback, coming from Conneticut, it's a good 1,000 miles. Any tips on how to move to a different state? How do you interview for job's being far away?

Appreciate any feedback.
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Fiancé wants to move down to Florida when she finishes vocational nursing school in the end of 2016.

I am interested in Texas so bit of deciding to do.

However, were planning on trying to save money up until were ready to move.

Feel be easier to land a job once we move. Any feedback, coming from Conneticut, it's a good 1,000 miles. Any tips on how to move to a different state? How do you interview for job's being far away?

Appreciate any feedback.
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I would have a job lined up before moving anywhere.
When you apply, on your Resume, atop write "Seeking to permanently relocate to Austin, Texas" so when they see you are an out of state candidate they will take you seriously since you want to relocate.

I did this and got an interview in Oregon (am from California), but decided not to go since I had to pay for the flight myself, I want them to pay for it.
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I think it depends the field you work in and what level your position is at. I can recall back in the late 90s when many employers would fly candidates to interviews if they were a considerable distance away... more than a 3 hour car drive. They also use to pay out a sign on bonus and pay for moving expenses. I have two friends that got that right out of college with a Bachelors. You're not going to find that now unless you are at a more senior or executive position.
Most companies are not going to offer a job to someone who does not live in the area. There are a few exceptions to this but not many. That being said, you would be in a better position to have a job lined up vs. not having one. I moved myself from the Northeast to Texas but I have family in Texas. I have yet to find work that even comes close to my education, experience and abilities. Now I am confronted with a gap in employment because most of what I have been doing does not really mesh with my resume and I really don't want to do sales.
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Jun 9, 2015 Solution
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You don't need to have a job lined up but should have a good amount of savings before you move. It's easier to find a job if you live near the city you're applying. A lot of companies are reluctant to pay for your airfare from another state unless you are really good at what you do and have a lot of experience.
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