what are a good pair of shears

Just finish beauty school and looking for a good pair of hair cutting shears any advise?
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This guy is nothing but a sales person if he is telling you buy a certain brand. Educate yourself on a metal but they're made out of and whether they're forged or casted and what kind of handle are you looking for. If you're prone to carpal tunnel go with a radical offset or swivel. Don't buy on payments because they Mark the shears way up like Hanzo
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Jun 18, 2019 Solution
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Hi scissorguy1, could you recommend a pair of thinning & normal cutting scissors for me? I just need them to be good quality & durable scissors that are below $100. I'm just using them at home. thanks!
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Nov 15, 2014 Solution
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ATS-314 is actually limited by the fact that it is produced by forging process. There are much better alloys containing Cobalt that cut smoother such as VG-10 and other similar Cobalt based materials. These super alloys also have better abrasion resistance thus sharpness retention is better than the scissors made from ATS-314 material. These Cobalt alloy material can reach hardness of 62.50 RHC which is higher than ATS-314 or 440C materials. Higher hardness and tensile strength of these materials make it possible for blades to be thiner and stay sharper longer.

It is important to remember that the blade geometry and edge surface is as important as the material from which scissors are made. The exceptional scissors will not allow hair to be pushed during the cutting process. Thus shearing as well as penetration into hair by cutting will take place if blades are designed and sharpened correctly.
Company in Canada called HAIRWhisper has developed micro-serration technology that allows them to place miniature teeth 1 micron to 25 micron size on the blade edge. These serrations increase sharpness retention and provide exceptional performance especially for dry hair application. The miniature teeth are so sharp that slide cut is still possible with these new generation of blades.
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Do your research first and foremost. This brand that brand blah blah blah. You want to pick the right shears by the steel. Nothing less than 440 C steel and the top steel available right now is the ATS- 314. Most people don't know that most Shears come from the exact same factories then bought by the various companies then marked up depending on the company. Japanese shear companies in General have the best quality shears. So look for the quality of steel and handle style. I prefer offset or the drop finger.
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LUCKY HARE Shears are THE BEST all around shear for anyone! I have been cutting hair for 10+ years, own every name brand pair of shears and can tell you that Lucky Hare shears, while unknown, are the all around best shear for every type of hair, value, and longevity.
Hikari's are great, but pricey, need sharpening more often.
Yasakas USED to be great, that's all I used years ago; they changed the way they made them and are junk now. I gave 2 pair away.
Kasho are good, expensive, smooth cutting, but expensive; especially for a graduate, unless you have a rich uncle. ๐Ÿ™‚
Everyone has a favorite and everyone's answer will be different, as we are all artists and are different.
You can quote me on this; You will not go wrong with Lucky Hare Shears. They can cut through the toughest hair, excel at scissor over comb, or dry cutting; great for all techniques. Not bad for an under $200 investment.
Shear Integrity is my fav place to buy shears; Glen will help you and be honest! Trusted him for years.
Have fun! ๐Ÿ™‚
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Here is the thing about hair shears. There are many good brands my top 3 would be in order: Hattori Hanzo Shears, Hikari, Kasho.

I believe these are the gold standard.

The main problem is many stylists to not take care of their tools, do not sharpen regularly, or when they do sharpen they use some guy who works out of his van and takes off to much metal.

Usually stylists are using dull shears (that of course will still cut when using enough hand tension), and are ruining their clients hair. The hair cut will look great when the client is in the chair, but after 1 or 2 days the damage done by using cheap, dull, or 20 year old shears will create a horrific result. The number 1 cause of split ends are dull shears.

Invest in a quality pair of shears, use different types of shears for different techniques (do painters just use one brush?), take care of your blades by cleaning regularly, sharpening every 500 haircuts (send to the manufacturer or to a known quality sharpening system), and if your hands are hurting then check your shear tension.
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I think that anyone here to help deserves your respect, and 50 years of hard work deserves more.

I have 30 years of exoerience, I recently had $13000 worth of shears, of all types and brands, stolen from my business. I will tell you this, choose wisely, if you plan a long career. Choose good quality, if you are busy, or plan to be. Hikari shears, FanOut shears and other high quality shears are not for everybody. They are for those with a few years of work under their belt, who are 70 -80% booked and plan on staying AT LEAST that busy. They are WELL worth the money.

I am both and educator and a platform artist, but mostly, I am a hairstylist. I will replace my shears with Hikari Cosmos, FanOut Mushin and Texturizers, Sensei Revo, Sensei NXT and Via Slip for dry slide cutting. Lenght is, to some extent, a personal choice. A longer pair would be great for working aroung the face and cutting in the nape area, as this keeps hand interference at a minimum.

I hope this helps, and I hope it is accepted as intended, as one stylist helping other stylists.
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I think that anyone here to help deserves your respect, and 50 years of hard work deserves more.

I have 30 years of exoerience, I recently had $13000 worth of shears, of all types and brands, stolen from my business. I will tell you this, choose wisely, if you plan a long career. Choose good quality, if you are busy, or plan to be. Hikari shears, FanOut shears and other high quality shears are not for everybody. They are for those with a few years of work under their belt, who are 70 -80% booked and plan on staying AT LEAST that busy. They are WELL worth the money.

I am both and educator and a platform artist, but mostly, I am a hairstylist. I will replace my shears with Hikari Cosmos, FanOut Mushin and Texturizers, Sensei Revo, Sensei NXT and Via Slip for dry slide cutting. Lenght is, to some extent, a personal choice. A longer pair would be great for working aroung the face and cutting in the nape area, as this keeps hand interference at a minimum.

I hope this helps, and I hope it is accepted as intended, as one stylist helping other stylists.
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I prefer the Saki Katana hair shears which are forged with very durable Japanese steel that provide the smoothest and swiftest cutting. I also love its light and comfortable design which is a MUST for any hair stylist. Very recommendable shears ๐Ÿ™‚
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I think you are extremely rude I think 50's comment was just to help others who might not be able to afford the higher priced shears. You my friend will be an old hair stylist one day if you make it in the business. I hope as you gain more experience you will get the respect you will deserve from other stylist. I'm from the Farrah Fawcet era myself. The younger stylist come to me all the time for help or maybe a few tricks.
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Musashi shears are the BEST for your money...they were featured in Shear Genius III. They are the Bentley of the shear world and they offer payment plans. They also have sharpeners that work in conjunction with them that are certified on the Diamond Rose Superior Sharpening system...this keeps they shears in factory new condition (given that they haven't been thrown all over the salon and car ;-))
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Linda, Sensei shears are okay if you buy the higher end shears. I sharpened many of these and have noticed that the "Revo" series models are getting great reviews. The "Revos" are ultra smooth and have a teflon insert in the pivot area for added smoothness and will make the shear last longer.I can't say much for all the other Sensei models, Good Luck!
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Hello Melcat42,

Both Kenchii and Lucky Hare are Fine Shears. Both, offer a Lifetime Warranty from manufacturer defects, both companies are American owned and operated, and both offer a wide variety of quality shears. As an educator and Shear Specialists, I would ask you:

What are you cutting with now? Length, Weight, Blade Type, and Handle Style?
Are you happy with the length, weight, blade type and handle style you are currently using?
What kind of cutting do you specialize in? Slide, Slithering, Channeling, Point Cutting, Blunt, Wet and Dry, or Wet only?
Do you prefer the razor like cut of a convex shear or the durability of the standard beveled edge?
Are you suffering from any hand, wrist, finger issues?
How long have you been a Stylists?
Do you prefer slim blades or "fatter" blades?
Are you right or left handed?
If left handed, do you cut with right handed shears or a true left handed shear?

Only after answering these questions, do I think you can make an informed decision. Some companies will just try to sell you anything, without regard to what shear is truly best for YOU.

And, I disagree that Titanium Coatings improve the durability or corrosion resistance of ANY shear. The titanium coating applied to hair cutting shears is cosmetic only and the ONLY benefits are that it does make it Pretty and it is good for those with allergies to Nickle.

I hope this helps guide you. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at *********** or call us, I will be happy to guide you, even if you chose to purchase from another company ๐Ÿ™‚

Customers that contact us, usually get a better deal too!

Whatever, you choose to do, I hope this had helped you, and I wish you the best in your quest for new hair cutting shears ๐Ÿ™‚

Dani Kirkpatrick
Shear Specialist,
[Contact information has been removed by a forum moderator]
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Hi Melcat42,
Both Kenchii and Lucky Hare are great shears. Bang for the buck, I can't knock either one. I have sold many of both, and never had a single complaint about either one. Lucky Hare always includes a case, finger rings, hairclip and a comb.

In reality, the titanium coatings are mostly for looks, though there are a couple of true benefits. One benefit is it can help to fight corrosion, but of course if you get a good shear, they are not going to corrode in the first place. The other benefit of a titanium coated shear is if you are allergic to nickel, (which is one of the alloy's used in making the stainless steel) it will protect you from the metal as long as it has not worn through anywhere you touch them a lot.

One of the benefits of a good chrome shear is you can make them sharper, because as you sharpen the titanium shears, the grinding process causes a chrome stripe along the cutting edge in the pretty finish. The higher the angle, the sharper the shears, but the bigger the stripe gets. Most people I sharpen for tell me to put the stripe and make them sharper, its not a huge stripe, i think it tends to give some of the shears character.

I always recommend someone get what they want, because it is ultimately up to you to make yourself happy and confident in your work. What better way to accomplish that boost in self esteem than having a MAD pair of shears in your hands.

You are more than welcome to give me a call or email me, and I can discuss shears in further detail, and offer you a deal like no one else can. If I don't answer, leave a message and I will be more than happy to call you back. We have hundreds of products that is not on MADShears
[Contact information has been removed by a forum moderator]
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How do you pick out the right shears for you. I was very confused until I found two websites. My instructor couldn't even help me choose. DrScissorhands came to my cosmetology school and did a class on hairstylist shears. Check out www.MADShears.com or www.DrScissorhands.com they have shears below some wholesale prices, and Danni at DrScissorhands helped me choose the right shear for me, like shear length, handle style, type of edge, very helpuful.
MADshears has an education page that helped guide me too, both have a layaway.I got my shears from one and my thinning shears from the other, and also got a feather razor cheap! Hope this helps! ๐Ÿ™‚
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