Do you ever feel when you apply for a job your just throwing your resume into a black hole? What does one do about it? My civi

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

44 months ago

Do you ever feel when you apply for a job your just throwing your resume into a black hole? What does one do about it? My civilian background is in ECE and my military background is in medical.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

44 months ago

The jobs you really want or are qualified for never call. Jobs, that call are either to far, low pay, or your not qualified for. Why is that?

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AndyRising in a State of Bliss

44 months ago

It might help you to be a bit (or a lot) more proactive. The job you really want, that you're fully qualified for? Don't just apply online. Do that, and then do what you can to find out who the hiring manager is (the person you'd actually work for, not the person in HR who's collecting resumes). Find that person on the company's website, on LinkedIn, or through some other conduit... like someone you know who's already in the company or the industry. Then contact that person. Tell them you've applied for X, and you wonder if you could talk with them informally about the company and how you might fit in there.

This strategy won't always work, but it seems to work for a lot of people.

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Shingami in Chicago, Illinois

44 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: Do you ever feel when you apply for a job your just throwing your resume into a black hole? What does one do about it?

All the time, especially when I'm 99%-100% qualified for the jobs and get no response. That's the worse. I do agree about smaller companies being more apt to see your resume than larger companies. I have applied multiple times to larger companies because they constantly have the same jobs posted, so I wonder what is going on. Why are these positions in constant rotation? I know they have to be getting applications.

My friend's mother works at Blue Cross Blue Shield, been there for decades. All my friend did was get called in for testing and interviews, never hired, she tried for a year, and she knew someone who worked there. I think these places are a crock of s### over half the time.

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Jackofnothing in New York, New York

44 months ago

Best thing to do is get a friend who works at the company that you are applying for to submit your resume to HR. Hopefully you have friends and didn't ditch them when you got married.

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Trying to Help in Detroit, Michigan

44 months ago

Make connections through local networking groups, recruiters and people in a specific company through LinkedIn. Be genuine and honest and people will respond in kind. Reach out and be personable. Don't be argumentative and treat them like real people. They will probably respond in kind.

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Burt Lange in Albany, New York

44 months ago

Trying to Help in Detroit, Michigan said: Make connections through local networking groups, recruiters and people in a specific company through LinkedIn. Be genuine and honest and people will respond in kind. Reach out and be personable. Don't be argumentative and treat them like real people. They will probably respond in kind.

So that's what we all have been doing wrong! We haven't been kind, gentle, friendly, smiling, soft spoken, personable.

Tried that when I first started I thought but recruiters, hiring mrgs, etc were rude, lying, abrupt, anal, picky.

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Trying to Help in Detroit, Michigan

44 months ago

Too much negativity. Can't you just accept someone is looking for some help and it's not always the right path to be so negative? Just stop already.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

44 months ago

Jackofnothing in New York, New York said: Best thing to do is get a friend who works at the company that you are applying for to submit your resume to HR. Hopefully you have friends and didn't ditch them when you got married.

I am NOT married. (That I know of!)

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realism37 in Georgia

44 months ago

Trying to Help in Detroit, Michigan said: Too much negativity. Can't you just accept someone is looking for some help and it's not always the right path to be so negative? Just stop already.

Speaking of negativity I think it is pretty negative to continue to beat on the unemployed and make it seem like they are the ones always at fault. So take your own advice and stop being so negative.

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Ms Doppelganger in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

44 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: I am NOT married. (That I know of!)

Don't mind the troll...

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

How come 99% of the jobs you apply to you never here from? Is is because o the BS taleo or other software? Why don't places list the salary or benefits in a job ad. Negotiable, TBD, Depends on experience does not count. If you put the salary then you get people who are really interested in the job. Why do we have minimum wage laws but not minimum benefits laws? Why you apply for a job never hear anything, then a week latter see the same or similar job posted? Also requiring you to speak a language other then English, doesn't that violate discrimination laws? If you are lucky to get an interview are the days of knowing if you did or did not get a job in less then a week over? I did have a place be professional enough to call me and tell me the position was filled before an interview. I had a place send me an email about setting up an interview so I reply heard nothing. I get an auto reply week latter the position was filled. I emailed and ask why did I get an email to set up an interview I you were not going to interview? They said its an auto email I feel sometimes my resume is going into a black hole any advice? Sorry if I am crying I just need to blow off some steam. I am not a troll. When your unemployed how do you remain positive? I am back in school for another degree.

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Burt Lange in Albany, New York

42 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: How come 99% of the jobs you apply to you never here from? Is is because o the BS taleo or other software? Why don't places list the salary or benefits in a job ad. Negotiable, TBD, Depends on experience does not count. If you put the salary then you get people who are really interested in the job. Why do we have minimum wage laws but not minimum benefits laws? Why you apply for a job never hear anything, then a week latter see the same or similar job posted? Also requiring you to speak a language other then English, doesn't that violate discrimination laws? If you are lucky to get an interview are the days of knowing if you did or did not get a job in less then a week over? I did have a place be professional enough to call me and tell me the position was filled before an interview. I had a place send me an email about setting up an interview so I reply heard nothing. I get an auto reply week latter the position was filled. I emailed and ask why did I get an email to set up an interview I you were not going to interview? They said its an auto email I feel sometimes my resume is going into a black hole any advice? Sorry if I am crying I just need to blow off some steam. I am not a troll. When your unemployed how do you remain positive? I am back in school for another degree.

I understand, I was blowing off steam the other Day on Indeed. By the way, how is my English?

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LoneOrca in Missouri

42 months ago

One of the most frustrating parts of job hunting I've noticed is a lot of times you have to deal with receptionists who are either told by the companies or decide on their own to try to convince people to do the outdated task of just feeling out an application right there and tell people they don't need to bring a resume in. I have gone to places for upper level jobs and tried to ask about informational interviewing or whether not they want more information, the receptionist would always try to convince is just filling out a resume.

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LoneOrca in Missouri

42 months ago

Some won't even let you take it home, then want it filled out there.

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LoneOrca in Missouri

42 months ago

And I'm not putting a lot on the receptionists, I think a lot of companies just have a lot of outdated job applicant standards that make it harder for job seekers to get noticed.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

After a job interview what are the who, what, were, when, why and hows of a follow up?

If a job does not list the salary how do you find out the salary without giving the wrong signal?

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Jobseeker1927 in Anytown

42 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: It might help you to be a bit (or a lot) more proactive. The job you really want, that you're fully qualified for? Don't just apply online. Do that, and then do what you can to find out who the hiring manager is (the person you'd actually work for, not the person in HR who's collecting resumes). Find that person on the company's website, on LinkedIn, or through some other conduit... like someone you know who's already in the company or the industry. Then contact that person. Tell them you've applied for X, and you wonder if you could talk with them informally about the company and how you might fit in there.

This strategy won't always work, but it seems to work for a lot of people.

Quite a while ago, I went walking around in the northern part of town here, figuring (for the heck of it) "do it the old fashioned way" of at least going to businesses and asking "Are you hiring?". At one point, a receptionist annoyedly responded "Go to our website.". I responded with, "Something could be available while I'm here.", to which she had a nasty attitude response. In other words, NO ONE wants you at their door. :-( I can't BEGIN to tell you how many times I've walked into other places and just asked the manager "Are you hiring?", only to get the response of "Have you been to our website?". They just do NOT want folks coming to their door.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: "Are you hiring?", only to get the response of "Have you been to our website?". They just do NOT want folks coming to their door.

That approach kind of went the way of the telephone booth, the Yellow Pages and big hair. Technology changes how we do what we do.

At my last company they were updating 911. It has to be able to accept text and video feeds in the future.

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Jobseeker1927 in Anytown

42 months ago

Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada said: That approach kind of went the way of the telephone booth, the Yellow Pages and big hair. Technology changes how we do what we do.

At my last company they were updating 911. It has to be able to accept text and video feeds in the future.

The only reason I told that story, was because of "Andy" advising to not just apply online. In this day and age, applicant's aren't given a choice about where and how they apply. We ALL have to apply online. :-(

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: The only reason I told that story, was because of "Andy" advising to not just apply online. In this day and age, applicant's aren't given a choice about where and how they apply. We ALL have to apply online. :-(

Pretty much. My father never use a computer in his life. He never wrote a resume either. He got every job by walking in and asking if they needed any help. Ancient History now.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: The only reason I told that story, was because of "Andy" advising to not just apply online. In this day and age, applicant's aren't given a choice about where and how they apply. We ALL have to apply online. :-(

We do. Hazel in Personnel retired a few years ago to Florida. Things haven't been the same since.

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Riot in Massachusetts

42 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: Quite a while ago, I went walking around in the northern part of town here, figuring (for the heck of it) "do it the old fashioned way" of at least going to businesses and asking "Are you hiring?". At one point, a receptionist annoyedly responded "Go to our website.". I responded with, "Something could be available while I'm here.", to which she had a nasty attitude response. In other words, NO ONE wants you at their door. :-( I can't BEGIN to tell you how many times I've walked into other places and just asked the manager "Are you hiring?", only to get the response of "Have you been to our website?". They just do NOT want folks coming to their door.

I think that your in-person approach is off. It's not intuitive for me to do this either, but it would go over better if you phrased your question and response in a more positive, assertive way. Instead of "Are you hiring?," you might try "Hi, I'm X! Nice to meet you. I'd like to apply for Position Y." They'll probably still tell you to look at the website. Follow up with something like "I can definitely go do that, but I was just in the area, so I thought I'd stop in. I actually have a copy of my resume with me. Let me just leave it with you, so that you're familiar with me when the application comes in over the computer. Notice from my experience that I think I can help you a lot with A, B, C."

It sounds really stupid and feels awkward as hell to talk like that, at least for me, but it will improve your response rate.

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Jobseeker1927 in Anytown

42 months ago

Riot in Massachusetts said: I think that your in-person approach is off. It's not intuitive for me to do this either, but it would go over better if you phrased your question and response in a more positive, assertive way. Instead of "Are you hiring?," you might try "Hi, I'm X! Nice to meet you. I'd like to apply for Position Y." They'll probably still tell you to look at the website. Follow up with something like "I can definitely go do that, but I was just in the area, so I thought I'd stop in. I actually have a copy of my resume with me. Let me just leave it with you, so that you're familiar with me when the application comes in over the computer. Notice from my experience that I think I can help you a lot with A, B, C."

It sounds really stupid and feels awkward as hell to talk like that, at least for me, but it will improve your response rate.

These days a person can be "diabetically sweet" and still get the cold shoulder response. They simply do NOT want folks coming to their doors. Otherwise they wouldn't bother with having folks apply thru their website. With technology the way it is today, they know they don't NEED to deal with folks face-to-face, so they prefer NOT to. If that means brushing folks off, then so be it in their eyes.

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Riot in Massachusetts

42 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: These days a person can be "diabetically sweet" and still get the cold shoulder response. They simply do NOT want folks coming to their doors. Otherwise they wouldn't bother with having folks apply thru their website. With technology the way it is today, they know they don't NEED to deal with folks face-to-face, so they prefer NOT to. If that means brushing folks off, then so be it in their eyes.

I'm just saying, that I've done it recently - well, within the last 5 years. I thought that I wanted to be a pharmacy technician, so I went around to local CVS and Walgreens with my resume, a total of 5 stores. I got a pharmacist at every one to take my resume, and must have impressed one enough that she promised me an interview when I applied online. I did and she did.

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AndyRising in a State of Bliss

42 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: The only reason I told that story, was because of "Andy" advising to not just apply online. In this day and age, applicant's aren't given a choice about where and how they apply. We ALL have to apply online. :-(

The approach I was talking about has nothing to do with walking into a business in person. It's about going beyond the online application and using social media outlets like LinkedIn to connect with people. Not just to ask whether they have any jobs, but to learn something about their company, their industry, or their particular job function. Working "Do you have any jobs" into the conversation comes later. It's not an approach I've used, because the jobs I want are advertised online when the companies need those people. And it's not the best approach for lots of jobs... jobs whose people aren't networking on those social media sites. But talking to people about work (and not just about jobs) is the tried-and-true way to find work. All the career bloggers say so. (For what that's worth. Ha!)

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Burt Lange in Albany, New York

42 months ago

I wouldn't walk into a place unless the ad said to apply in person!

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

Burt Lange in Albany, New York said: I wouldn't walk into a place unless the ad said to apply in person!

You walk into some places they say go apply online. That is what they tell you at job fairs. However if I do walk in it is usually to see if they have an opening.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: It might help you to be a bit (or a lot) more proactive. The job you really want, that you're fully qualified for? Don't just apply online. Do that, and then do what you can to find out who the hiring manager is (the person you'd actually work for, not the person in HR who's collecting resumes). Find that person on the company's website, on LinkedIn, or through some other conduit... like someone you know who's already in the company or the industry. Then contact that person. Tell them you've applied for X, and you wonder if you could talk with them informally about the company and how you might fit in there.

This strategy won't always work, but it seems to work for a lot of people.

I do that. I email, snail mail. I try linkedin (even thought the new email don't work). Why you think I am on indeed.com forums.

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Sabsfan in Frederick, Maryland

42 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: The approach I was talking about has nothing to do with walking into a business in person. It's about going beyond the online application and using social media outlets like LinkedIn to connect with people. Not just to ask whether they have any jobs, but to learn something about their company, their industry, or their particular job function. Working "Do you have any jobs" into the conversation comes later. It's not an approach I've used, because the jobs I want are advertised online when the companies need those people. And it's not the best approach for lots of jobs... jobs whose people aren't networking on those social media sites. But talking to people about work (and not just about jobs) is the tried-and-true way to find work. All the career bloggers say so. (For what that's worth. Ha!)

What if you know all you need to know and all you're interested in is working there? I just want to know how to get hired and apparently I can't ask them that or to anything of that avail (i.e. do you hire non sociable people)
I always apply to stores I have shopped at and most of them I've shopped at many times so there's nothing left to know.
It feels so disingenuous

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AndyRising in a State of Bliss

42 months ago

Sabsfan in Frederick, Maryland said: What if you know all you need to know and all you're interested in is working there? ... I always apply to stores I have shopped at...

That's what I mean when I say it's an approach that doesn't work for many jobs. It's an approach for white-collar corporate jobs, not retail jobs. But even for retail jobs, there's the "My best friend's Aunt Suzy says they need cashiers at the store she works at" kind of networking.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: That's what I mean when I say it's an approach that doesn't work for many jobs. It's an approach for white-collar corporate jobs, not retail jobs. But even for retail jobs, there's the "My best friend's Aunt Suzy says they need cashiers at the store she works at" kind of networking.

Everyone says to 'network', but no one says to how to 'network'. Yes I am on Linkdein, Careerbuilder, Monster, indeed forums, etc.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: Everyone says to 'network', but no one says to how to 'network'. Yes I am on Linkdein, Careerbuilder, Monster, indeed forums, etc.

They also say NOT to spend all your time online looking for a job. You need to see people F2F (face to face).

Most books say that waiting until you are unemployed isn't networking; you're just a pain in the a$$ then. Networking and I didn't know this either starts a week after you start your new job. In other words, you have to do it all the time now. We use to call this cronyism but they call it networking now.

Go to the library and start checking out books on networking. Some techniques (most of them)will not be your cup of tea but others might work.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: That's what I mean when I say it's an approach that doesn't work for many jobs. It's an approach for white-collar corporate jobs, not retail jobs. But even for retail jobs, there's the "My best friend's Aunt Suzy says they need cashiers at the store she works at" kind of networking.

I worked for one company that held each job "in-house" for 30 days before they would advertise it. Usually someone knew someone who needed a job. Didn't cost the company a dime to hire this way.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: Everyone says to 'network', but no one says to how to 'network'. Yes I am on Linkdein, Careerbuilder, Monster, indeed forums, etc.

I attended an awards ceremony once with my manager and met another gal there who was with her manager. We both kept in touch and a few years later, I knew I was going to get the axe at the one company I was with. I called her and a week later, I was employed at her company.

This happens more than you think and is true networking. Again, once you are unemployed, people will avoid you like the plague. You need to network all the time now. Its not something that we think about though.

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CareerTuners in Los Angeles

42 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: Everyone says to 'network', but no one says to how to 'network'. Yes I am on Linkdein, Careerbuilder, Monster, indeed forums, etc.

TGPII, we've got a free 30 day networking course going on that should help you with that. We cover everything you need to know in order to develop a modern day networking strategy that'll help you develop champions in your network AND improve your response rates when you apply for jobs. careertuners.com/network

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

CareerTuners in Los Angeles said: TGPII, we've got a free 30 day networking course going on that should help you with that. We cover everything you need to know in order to develop a modern day networking strategy that'll help you develop champions in your network AND improve your response rates when you apply for jobs. careertuners.com/network

I don't need response rate. Responding to my resume and hiring me are 2 different things.

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Liliah in Richmond, Virginia

42 months ago

Every time

I sometimes wonder

Why am I doing this, it's just a waste of time?

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

42 months ago

I notice on a lot of job boards, including indeed.com a job will say it is a few days old. You click the help wanted ad, and it sends you to another job site. Only to find the job is over a month old. Why is that? And I am not a troll or trolling!

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

42 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: I notice on a lot of job boards, including indeed.com a job will say it is a few days old. You click the help wanted ad, and it sends you to another job site. Only to find the job is over a month old. Why is that? And I am not a troll or trolling!

Indeed like many other mega boards are an aggregator. It picks up job listings when it gets to them not when they first appear.

If a company uses two or three job boards AND lists the job on its own site, don't even bother looking at dates. Its meaningless.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

41 months ago

Top 10 things you never say to some one who is looking for a job and why!

10
Here is a list of jobs! (Finding jobs is easy. Getting hired is the issue.)
9
Your lazy! (We/I would love to work.)
8
Go on unemployment! (Thank you Captain Obvious.)
7
Change fields! (How and I went to school for this field.)
6
Fine tune your resume. (We/I did that already!)
5
Work on you interviewing skills. (First I have to get the interview!)
4
Go to/ back school. (With what money?)
3
Network! (Tell us/me to network but don't explain how to network!)
2
You turned down a job? (If it cost me more in travel and time then I would make yes!)
1
Don't give up hope! (However we/I are about to give up/lose our home.)

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

41 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: Top 10 things you never say to some one who is looking for a job and why!

10
Here is a list of jobs! (Finding jobs is easy. Getting hired is the issue.)
9
Your lazy! (We/I would love to work.)
8
Go on unemployment! (Thank you Captain Obvious.)
7
Change fields! (How and I went to school for this field.)
6
Fine tune your resume. (We/I did that already!)
5
Work on you interviewing skills. (First I have to get the interview!)
4
Go to/ back school. (With what money?)
3
Network! (Tell us/me to network but don't explain how to network!)
2
You turned down a job? (If it cost me more in travel and time then I would make yes!)
1
Don't give up hope! (However we/I are about to give up/lose our home.)

Dear Santa:

How are you? I am fine. What type of cookies and milk would you like this year? I been a good boy. I got 2 As in school and an award from the ARNG.

I know you are busy but for Xmas can I please have a full time job with a living wage and benefits?

Thank you!

Happy Holidays,

Tom

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BetterLuck in Clifton Park, New York

41 months ago

Jobseeker1927 in Anytown said: Quite a while ago, I went walking around in the northern part of town here, figuring (for the heck of it) "do it the old fashioned way" of at least going to businesses and asking "Are you hiring?". At one point, a receptionist annoyedly responded "Go to our website.". I responded with, "Something could be available while I'm here.", to which she had a nasty attitude response. In other words, NO ONE wants you at their door. :-( I can't BEGIN to tell you how many times I've walked into other places and just asked the manager "Are you hiring?", only to get the response of "Have you been to our website?". They just do NOT want folks coming to their door.

I have built quite a few websites. I remember, even from the earliest times, that websites were geared to sell and communicate so that the people answering the phone would be interrupted less by the same old questions (because they were the people most overloaded). And then those administrative people were given a whole new layer of chores like doing the crappy newsletters, mailings, etc. for the company. Now I suspect people happily hide behind their websites, if they can use it to be less interrupted.

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Burt Lange in Albany, New York

41 months ago

BetterLuck in Clifton Park, New York said: I have built quite a few websites. I remember, even from the earliest times, that websites were geared to sell and communicate so that the people answering the phone would be interrupted less by the same old questions (because they were the people most overloaded). And then those administrative people were given a whole new layer of chores like doing the crappy newsletters, mailings, etc. for the company. Now I suspect people happily hide behind their websites, if they can use it to be less interrupted.

Sometimes I see websites, actually more and more sites where there is no phone number. Why, because they don't want the staff tied up on the phone all day. Before the no phone number websites companies started using the automated answering message...push 1 for this dept, 2 for this other dept. So the staff wasn't tied up on the phone unnecessarily.

That's progress!

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

41 months ago

LoneOrca in Missouri said: Some won't even let you take it home, then want it filled out there.

Most tell you go online.

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

41 months ago

Yesterday I found a job online (posted that day) and applied. It was on craigslist and later I found it on indeed. Who post jobs on Xmas? If you that despite to fill the job that you post on Xmas why can't they get back to me right away? Maybe its an auto post and it was a Friday?

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

41 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: It might help you to be a bit (or a lot) more proactive. The job you really want, that you're fully qualified for? Don't just apply online. Do that, and then do what you can to find out who the hiring manager is (the person you'd actually work for, not the person in HR who's collecting resumes). Find that person on the company's website, on LinkedIn, or through some other conduit... like someone you know who's already in the company or the industry. Then contact that person. Tell them you've applied for X, and you wonder if you could talk with them informally about the company and how you might fit in there.

This strategy won't always work, but it seems to work for a lot of people.

More proactive? I apply on average 2-3 jobs a day. Even on weekends. I send follow ups, emails. I Even sent follow ups in Xmas cards. I had a few companies that band me from applying because I was so proactive. I am using the indeed job boards and on linkedin. I have a BA and in the ARNG. I am in school working on another AA. Being to proactive can scare a place away.

Yesterday I found a job online (posted that day) and applied. It was on craigslist and later I found it on indeed. Who post jobs on Xmas? If you that despite to fill the job that you post on Xmas why can't they get back to me right away? Maybe its an auto post and it was a Friday?

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TGPII in Chicago, Illinois

41 months ago

Jackofnothing in New York, New York said: Best thing to do is get a friend who works at the company that you are applying for to submit your resume to HR . Hopefully you have friends and didn't ditch them when you got married.

What if you got no friends or they don't have HR. HR works for the employer but everyone thinks hr works for the employee.

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Jolene Hey in Saint Louis, Missouri

41 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: Do you ever feel when you apply for a job your just throwing your resume into a black hole? What does one do about it? My civilian background is in ECE and my military background is in medical.

In college, I felt like a Black Hole devoured all of my resumes. I just kept writing them, following the instructions given to me by the Executive Recruiter from Boeing that happened to be part of the Alumni and the assigned recruiter for my university. He told me everything I needed to do. I did it for three months straight (October-December) and lost my energy. I gave up on getting a technical internship, instead focusing the next three months (January-March) applying to “fun” summer jobs. I was hired as an Art Director for a summer camp in March. Two weeks later, I got a phone interview with Boeing. I received an offer letter in early April, which had me starting the first week of May. I had to cancel my “fun” summer job, which I still think I would have enjoyed, but they said they understood my reasoning. My advice, keep it up! (and perfect what you have) Remember that really large companies may take months to do anything useful. For example, Boeing used to close most of its Internship requisitions in November, but didn’t interview til February, or hire before April, the following year.

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Jolene Hey in Saint Louis, Missouri

41 months ago

TGPII in Chicago, Illinois said: The jobs you really want or are qualified for never call. Jobs, that call are either to far, low pay, or your not qualified for. Why is that?

Though I don’t know the exact reasons for your situation, here are some reasons why you may not get a call-back from a resume submission: (1) Online submissions are often keyword filtered. If you don’t keyword-tailor a resume, the Hiring Manager may never see it. (2) Even though a Hiring Managers created a job requisition, sometimes they already had a person in-mind. We can thank “Equal Opportunity” laws for those kinds of shenanigans, though, I do understand that the laws are meant to avoid “cronyism,” and they may avoid it at less-savvy companies. (3) The company may have had to discontinue the hiring process due to losing a contract or client (and the revenue that would have come from that client).
For jobs that are too far, too low paying, and things you are not qualified for, here are some reasons why you may get a call-back: (1) They got your resume, so they think you want the job (even if they didn’t tell you ahead of time where it would be, the salary, or the full qualifications). (2) They may not be getting qualified applicants closer or cannot afford the higher pay, so they are hoping you might be desperate for experience. (3) They may be looking for someone with your tenacity, who would be willing to learn the skills necessary, through on-the-job training or going back to school while you work.

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