Graduated 1 year ago, Didn't like Degree, Don't know what I actually want, Working HS level jobs, Embarrassed, Lost

Comments (34)

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

This is a long one, but I really need help.

I graduated a year ago with a marketing degree with a good deal of communication coursework from a nearby private college. I never knew what I wanted to do in college, so just ended up in marketing thinking it would be a versatile degree, and thinking my actual calling would come to light by the time I was a senior. Well, it didn't, so I just finished my degree so I could have one being so close. Also during that time, I was toying with changing to a communications major, hence a lot of classes in the area. I also completed an internship with a large regional hospital doing internal communications work, mostly writing. I didn't end up liking the type of work at the internship.

This whole time, I started to develop a distaste toward marketing. I didn't feel like I was learning any actually useful knowledge, I decided I was not in the right field, and post-college, none of the job opportunities are remotely attractive. They are all sales, or other similarly monotonous things. I also developed an inferiority complex about it all in my junior year. I felt embarrassed I was in a field deemed easy (which it was at least at my school. Just BSing and easy A classes). I compare myself to people in things like engineering, medicine, hard sciences, math... basically STEM people. And it makes me feel inferior, stupid, and like dirt. It makes me further hate myself than I already do. The whole campaign of commercials for STEM careers hit at a great time to rub it in my face. I have a history of being bullied, and it may have something to do with me letting it get to me.

The whole time I have seriously struggled to determine what field is right for me to be in and what major is right. Without trying anything, I don't know how I am supposed to know. Laying down a bunch of money to "try" a major after already being a graduate in debt I don't think is a smart move. (continued in following post)

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

It doesn't help that coursework often is much much different than what the actual job is like. I also started to lean toward a job in a science field. Partly because of my inferior feelings, partly because I used to always love science (Bad experiences in science and math during high school made me think "no more!" at the time. Who likes hard classes?) From 3rd grade, I always thought I wanted to be a meteorologist. I loved the weather and reading about it, and still do. Passing physics with a D and not being close enough to a college that had meteorology (I was very afraid of going to college and wanted to live at home), as well as few job opportunities scratched that idea off the list. Maybe something like chemistry would be for me. Content wise, I found it the most interesting and made the most sense to me in high school. But are there jobs in straight-up chemistry? Maybe something like engineering? My mom always thought I'd be one when I was younger. I honestly don't know what they do though. And I perceive it as way too hard. It would put to rest my inferiority though, and maybe I really would like it, or at least dislike it as much as my worthless marketing degree.

MEANWHILE, beginning in high school and all the way to the present, my absolute dream job is to be a musician. I want to be in a solo/small group band playing indie and electronic music. This dream has never left me and I keep trying to teach myself post-college on how to produce music. It's just not going very well. I live in a very "backwards" area when it comes to music so I know nobody who shares the same dream in a similar genre. I am currently in a alternative rock band however, which was quite a blessing. While the music is good, It just isn't the music that I really truly feel and am excited about.

So in addition to being totally lost on what to do as a "real career" kind of job, I hope and pray that I can be a musician so am afraid of even landing a "real job" in fear

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

In fear of it shelving my music dreams. How will I get off work if I need to? Even in my current band, we have had shows 3 weekends in a row. We want to do small tours. How could I do this with a real 9-5 job? On the other hand, it takes years to become successful and live off of your music, if ever. I developed this dream late while in high school and didn't begin working toward it till maybe half-way through college and only lightly.

I forgot to add that after I graduated college, I was looking for jobs despite not liking my degree. I often tried to stretch my skills and apply to different jobs that aren't really marketing in scope. Jobs including IT Help Desk (I've always been pretty good with computers. No training or anything. Think the field could be something for me), supply chain jobs, and purchasing jobs. Anything to try and side-step out of marketing. I've had zero interviews, though I've probably only applied to 24 jobs since graduating. Applying as well as getting any sort of reply is mind-numbingly terrifying for me. I feel extremely sick to my stomach after applying and regularly for the next week or two, and if I get any phone calls or emails, my heart begins pounding very hard and my face goes cold. It is a terrible and terrifying experience. It causes me extraordinary anxiety. That and the fact I don't care for any of the jobs I applied for have stunted and now completely halted my applications for jobs.

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

Right now, I am working two part-time jobs. One at a more-so upscale chain restaurant, and the other at a wealthy country club. The two are quickly burning me out as I often go right from one to the other. I wake up between 3-5 a.m. and don't get home until 7 p.m. This doesn't leave me any time to work on my true passion of music, let alone figure my entire life out that I'm spilling out here. I could write a lot more, but this can't get too long. I am extremely depressed, embarrassed with where I am in life, exhausted, and losing any hope of ever being happy. I'm embarrassed even writing this post, but I don't know where to turn.

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

Tell me if there's something I can add to help you help me.

Riot in Massachusetts

44 months ago

Do the jobs you could get with you degree pay more than your two part-time jobs? If so, I would just go ahead and do that, even if it's not what I wanted to do forever. Plenty of people work at a job they hate to subsidize doing what really makes them happy during off hours. Money doesn't solve everything, but you'll probably be a lot happier if you have money problems taken care of than if you don't. Now, you probably are afraid of "getting stuck" at some marketing job you hate. That's a valid concern. Just go in with a plan that you're just doing that until something better comes along. You're not ever going to have time to figure things out if you're working 70 hours a week for peanuts, but you might if you're working 40-50 for a livable wage. You also bring up depression and inferiority quite a bit. Definitely go talk to someone about that. It's really tough to figure your life out if you're poor and sad.

Eyota in Michigan

44 months ago

Whatdoido in Michigan said: Tell me if there's something I can add to help you help me.

Hi there, I don't have any solutions but please know that you're not alone. I am in the exact same boat. I graduated with a degree that is "useless" and found out I didn't like my major in my senior year. I tried searching for a job in my field, but only had two interviews out of a hundred applications. I had to make some money so I worked retail for a year. I almost drank myself to death because of the toxic customers. I took two temporary positions last year and my most recent one ended in December. I've been out of work since. I'm mid-twenties with no job, watching my siblings in STEM graduate and move on with their lives.

I know exactly how you feel. As hard as it is, please don't think of yourself as a loser. You're not. Most young people don't know what they want in life at an early age. I wish I had known better to enter STEM, but I honestly don't think my mind is made for it. What's done is done, though. We can only look forward. We're in this together. :)

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

eyota in Michigan said: Hi there, I don't have any solutions but please know that you're not alone. I am in the exact same boat. I graduated with a degree that is "useless" and found out I didn't like my major in my senior year. I tried searching for a job in my field, but only had two interviews out of a hundred applications. I had to make some money so I worked retail for a year. I almost drank myself to death because of the toxic customers. I took two temporary positions last year and my most recent one ended in December. I've been out of work since. I'm mid-twenties with no job, watching my siblings in STEM graduate and move on with their lives.

I know exactly how you feel. As hard as it is, please don't think of yourself as a loser. You're not. Most young people don't know what they want in life at an early age. I wish I had known better to enter STEM, but I honestly don't think my mind is made for it. What's done is done, though. We can only look forward. We're in this together. :)

It's so hard to keep living. I wish I knew people in real life like myself.

UM in Los Angeles, California

44 months ago

I read your post and here is the solution I see for you, but first I need to provide you with my background.

Marketing: A very in-depth field, you need analytical mind and require creativity to think outside of the box.

Solution #1:
Between your 2 jobs, select the one with the higher income and keep that one.
Drop the 2nd job and drive Uber instead ==> it provides more flexibility and income still coming in. You need rest to balance yourself out.

For your music and passion:
Select even just 1 or 2 hours a week and put this aside to contribute toward your passion. You will feel more fulfill and in turn more idea will come to you and this helps with your self-esteem tremendously. It takes time to build self-confidence. It is like a plant, it takes time and discipline to growth :)

You need to feed your passion for you to feel alive and fulfill at the time time working and paying your bill. I hope this help.

In my defense for marketing: it is an extremely in-depth field and you need a strong analytical mind to do competitor analysis, understand the patterns of the marketing, develop plans to build customer relationship etc. It is a lot more fun than I personally realize. I went to school for Environmental Science and now I end up loving marketing :)

I hope this help. Please keep me posted with how things are going on your end.

Whatdoido in Michigan

44 months ago

eyota in Michigan said: Hi there, I don't have any solutions but please know that you're not alone. I am in the exact same boat. I graduated with a degree that is "useless" and found out I didn't like my major in my senior year. I tried searching for a job in my field, but only had two interviews out of a hundred applications. I had to make some money so I worked retail for a year. I almost drank myself to death because of the toxic customers. I took two temporary positions last year and my most recent one ended in December. I've been out of work since. I'm mid-twenties with no job, watching my siblings in STEM graduate and move on with their lives.

I know exactly how you feel. As hard as it is, please don't think of yourself as a loser. You're not. Most young people don't know what they want in life at an early age. I wish I had known better to enter STEM, but I honestly don't think my mind is made for it. What's done is done, though. We can only look forward. We're in this together. :)

It's so hard to keep living. I wish I knew people in real life like myself.

Marlie in Gibsonia, Pennsylvania

12 months ago

This sounds a lot like me right now

BungholeBill in Orangevale, California

11 months ago

If it makes you feel any better, I graduated with highest honors in neurobiology and absolutely want to kill myself when I look at my job prospects. STEM people arn't smarter they generally are just far more tunnel visioned when it comes to having other interest. The jobs are boring beyond reason. Soul crushing. I really wish I wouldn't have listened to that stupid voice in my head telling me other majors are below STEM because it just is not true.

njbiodude in San Mateo, California

10 months ago

BungholeBill in Orangevale, California said: If it makes you feel any better, I graduated with highest honors in neurobiology and absolutely want to kill myself when I look at my job prospects. STEM people arn't smarter they generally are just far more tunnel visioned when it comes to having other interest. The jobs are boring beyond reason. Soul crushing. I really wish I wouldn't have listened to that stupid voice in my head telling me other majors are below STEM because it just is not true.

Bio related fields are trash. Trash. Trash.

I'd recommend looking into healthcare or another field. You might as well.

Jsg18 in Decatur, Indiana

10 months ago

Whatdoido in Michigan said: Tell me if there's something I can add to help you help me.

I know this is an old post, but I’m going through something similar and thought I’d offer a few suggestions. One would be applying for an office/administrative position for a scientific company. Another would be to find a job or career in music. Maybe teach an instrument or work at a music store instead of one of your part time jobs. Some schools offer teaching certificates to bachelors degree holders so maybe you could be a music teacher. Finally, are there opportunities at the restaurant or country club you’re working at?

Anyway, I hope things are looking up for you. Also there is no reason to panic every time you apply for a job. Worst case scenario, you blow the interview and they don’t hire you. It happens all the time and it’s not the end of the world!

lifeisHarsh23 in Seattle, Washington

9 months ago

Whatdoido in Michigan said: Tell me if there's something I can add to help you help me.

I don't know if I can help with anything but I am in a similar situation. I actually graduated with a degree in biology (I know, STEM people) but I have yet to even have an interview for a job either outside my degree or within my degree. It seems that even with school you need an extreme amount of experience in order to apply. I have gone through an internship in which I thought I wanted to make a career but it turns out that I wasn't really suited for. I have no job and no idea what to do and it seems there is no one able to help me figure any of this out. I suffer from anxiety and depression and this whole situation is just making it worse.

You are not alone.

SendARaven in Liberty, Texas

9 months ago

Hey lifeisharsh, have you tried applying to jobs in zoos or parks and wildlife jobs? I just googled my local parks and wildlife and zoos and the zoo didn't have anything but the parks and wildlife department had job listings for technicians and it said they'd substitute a biology degree for the experience requirement. It's probably entry level but it's a foot in the door. Maybe try looking into something similar at your local parks and zoos? I know a former coworker who had a biology degree and got a job like that.

DCS1122 in San Luis Obispo, California

9 months ago

Hi, saw your post and felt like it was scarily relatable. I am a history student (i know, liberal arts) graduating in June. I had to pick my major going in, and I am very confused about what I’m going to do when I get out. I haven’t got much experience within my degree, and most of my employment history is in restaurant and babysitting. Ive had a couple of internships in unrelated fields such as social media & politics. I’ve grown to the idea of teaching, but I was also interested in getting an MBA. Problem is, my GPA is 2.4 and I’m considering whether or not to take a gap year, since I’ve only just started the process and it ends in 2 weeks. Im prone to episodes of severe depression and moderate anxiety. I also have little money, and would have to take loans to pay for grad school.

DCS1122 in San Luis Obispo, California

9 months ago

TLDR; I’m going into a similar situation, and want to say you’re not alone. Hope things work out, and that we find well-paying jobs

SendARaven in League City, Texas

9 months ago

DCS, you might want to try looking into museum jobs, I've seen job listings for those where they want people with history or art history degrees. As for the MBA, I've seen several posts here from people who got one saying they can't find a job without experience, just FYI.

DCS1122 in San Francisco, California

9 months ago

SendARaven in League City, Texas said: DCS, you might want to try looking into museum jobs, I've seen job listings for those where they want people with history or art history degrees. As for the MBA, I've seen several posts here from people who got one saying they can't find a job without experience, just FYI.

Thanks, I didn’t consider museum jobs. And I did not know about that problem with the mba, which definitely changes my considerations. I’m thinking a gap year might do me some good to make some money and figure out my goals in life

SendARaven in League City, Texas

9 months ago

DCS1122 in San Francisco, California said: Thanks, I didn’t consider museum jobs. And I did not know about that problem with the mba, which definitely changes my considerations. I’m thinking a gap year might do me some good to make some money and figure out my goals in life

I should make something clear: I didn't mean to imply that you shouldn't get an MBA, only that the feedback I've seen here from people who got one hasn't been positive. I myself was thinking of getting an MBA. But if you really want to get one, that's up to you. I looked up the top business schools just to see and many of them have extremely low admission rates and even application fees costs a mint. I can't even imagine how much tuition actually costs at these places but I've heard unless you go to a top school, you're not going to have a great chance at getting a job, don't know if it's true but it may be true in this job economy.

Also, I don't know what you mean by "gap year" but I'd be extremely careful taking any time off after you get your degree. Employers do not look favorably upon gaps between employment of any kind on a resume no matter what the reason is. I had an interviewer be outright rude about my not having a job in my unemployment days (even though it was because I was having a horrible time getting any job without experience), I got asked about it at least once at another interview and while I was interviewed for a job at an executive recruiting firm, they said flat out that they only considered candidates that were already currently employed. So be careful here. You don't want prospective employers tossing your resume on sight because you weren't working or doing anything for a period of time.

TJ1 in Kannapolis, North Carolina

9 months ago

I know B.S., M.S., and PhD grads in multiple countries. All who didn't have exceptional social networking and personality are working HS jobs or factories or power plants..

I have a brother in law with a engineering PhD who fell in to the same circumstances working as basically a technician in a factory.. He's one of those people who were naturally intelligent and was suppose to go to college too..

ab_hopeful in Portland, Oregon

8 months ago

Whatdoido in Michigan said: Tell me if there's something I can add to help you help me.

I’m not sure if I will be of any help but at least you can know you’re not alone. I graduated with a BS in graphic design in December. Going through we were told repeatedly we would have no problem finding work because we are the top design city and one of the top design schools in the country. I also researched before about salary and jobs. The issue is that now even entry level jobs are thinking you should have 2-5 years of experience. The only way it would seem to gain that is through internships and freelancing. I have zero interest in working for myself. I like the reliability of having a job and having somewhere to go during the day and then leaving it at work. I have probably applied to around 25-30 jobs. I ended up also looking into communication jobs because they often require graphic design skills. I too struggle with the anxiety of interviewing and the idea of starting a new job. The struggle is real.

In your situation it sounds like your outlook is very bleak because you’re so drained from your part-time jobs. If I were you and were able to get something that paid better in your field I would take it so that you can have more “me” time and from there you can start taking care of your health. Maybe it’s finding time to do something you really enjoy. When you’re more mentally healthy then you’ll think more clearly. Maybe you’ll end up really liking the job in your field once you get used to it. And even if you don’t you’ll be more financially able to make a different plan. As far as the music, I hate to be a negative nelly, but it’s very hard to make it in the music industry. Maybe just enjoy it as a side hustle or as a stress relief but with as stressed as you are, plus I’m assuming you worry about college debt, trying to make music a full time thing just seems too risky.

Averagegirl in Saint Paul, Minnesota

7 months ago

Hi. Just wanted to say you’re not alone. I wish there was a real-life in-person support group I could find for this type of problem. I graduated last May with a B.S. in Business Administration. “Oh the places you’ll go...” everyone said. They lied. Dozens of interviews in dozens of reasonable jobs, but nothing. I’ve been pitifully working for a restaurant only 30 hours a week for the past YEAR. My other experience is bleak too. I’ve had a receptionist job as well as an unrelated internship (in PR). Deep down I think I knew I didn’t want to do business, but I changed my major late (beginning junior year) and thought it was versatile enough that I told myself that in order to graduate on time, I had to do that. I felt very pressured to pick one even though I didn't really know what I wanted. On top of that, my parents only told me they would only help me pay for school if I stuck it through and didn’t drop out/take a gap year. Yet another reason I felt pressured to just pick one and finish it. I do resent them now too, which is painful. I struggle with anxiety and although I like talking to people, I struggle with networking because of my soft spoken nature. I’m a hard worker but I’m often overlooked. After a year of pain and embarrassment and disappointing looks from parents, I’m starting a temp-to-hire position in office/clerical work that you only need a high school degree for. It pays so poorly. But I didn’t know what else to do. At least I can say something better than “I’m a server at the same place I worked throughout college.” Now I have a position title that sounds smart but in reality is the lowliest office position. This system is screwed up. Wish i would’ve dropped out and figured out what I had wanted first, but alas, we are here on this thread because it did not happen. I apologize if this sounds like I’m joining your pity party. I know I can’t offer much hope, but I do hope knowing there are others out there provides comfort in this tough time of yours.

TumbleWeedArea in Colorado Springs, Colorado

7 months ago

Averagegirl in Saint Paul, Minnesota said: I graduated last May with a B.S. in Business Administration . “Oh the places you’ll go...” everyone said. They lied. Dozens of interviews in dozens of reasonable jobs, but nothing.

@Averagegirl your story is very relatable. I Graduated College in summer of 2014 with a BA in Mass Communications. The degree isn't worth the ink its printed on.. should have been a major red flag when your college professors are telling you the field is dying and pay is horrible... demoralizing experience

I had parents who essentially blackmailed me into enrolling at a local state university right out of high school because like you said "oh the places you'll go"... "you just need a degree...any degree". Taking a year off of high school or getting a 2 year degree just wasn't enough/out of the question for my parents.

So here I am 5 years later ... no career... never made over 15 bucks an hour even with a degree and am stagnating living in a small town. (all this on top of major family drama including death of relatives etc.)

I totally can also relate to the "disappointed parents" thing. They just can't understand why I don't have a "career" and aren't making 70k a year. In retrospect i honestly cant believe how outdated/stupid parents can be. High school kids are getting scammed by universities big time! No understanding of how the real economy works at 18 years old!!

I have pretty much conceded that if I ever plan on making a true livable wage ill have to likely transition completely out of low end office jobs/clerical work. What ill do next I'm not sure.

wish I knew about stuff like dental hygiene back when my parents were willing to pay for college! Yeowzers!!!

Ironically the only schools that offer night time classes in my area for working adults are all low paying careers! Go figure!

TumbleWeedArea in Colorado Springs, Colorado

7 months ago

Averagegirl in Saint Paul, Minnesota said: Hi. Just wanted to say you’re not alone. I wish there was a real-life in-person support group I could find for this type of problem. I graduated last May with a B.S. in Business Administration . “Oh the places you’ll go...”

Its even worse being unemployed/underemployed with a degree in boring cities/small towns (in fact that's probably a huge part of my problem). I at least wish there was a beach I could go to lol

kghjnks

7 months ago

“Maybe something like engineering ? My mom always thought I'd be one when I was younger.”
Going off of this statement, I’d like to say: “don’t listen to what other tell you to be”
I started my college career at Penn State, Erie: The Behrend College. It’s known for STEM classes and graduates. After being 4th in my high school graduating class and receiving a 3.98 GPA I really thought I was ready for college. My homeroom teacher taught chemistry and bio and I always excelled in both subjects as well as math and drafting, so she always told me that I would be a “great engineer.”
After discussing (for hours) with my parents, they also agreed that engineering was the right path for me and I had convinced myself, as well, that it was the right fit. So I applied to penn state and also point park university in Pittsburgh to major in Mechanical Engineering Technology.
I decided not to go for a straight shot engineering degree after job shadowing a civil engineer because the job is not at all what people think it is. Engineering isn’t a strictly “out in the field, designing things, and building them by hand” job like I thought it was.
I’ve always loved working with my hands and creating things, and I’m very crafty. These aspects also came into play when I was deciding on a major/career and lead me straight to engineering. I wanted to create things, invent, and build things the way I wanted them, but that is exactly everything engineering is not.
Engineering is sitting at a desk for 8+ hours a day designing things by strict standards and regulations that leave no room for creativity and thinking outside the box. It’s not working in the field and adding your own spin on things, like I wished it was.
I ended up leaving after a year. So, PLEASE don’t ever think you are inferior to STEM majors because it’s the same 9-5 job everyone else has.

Average in Everett, Massachusetts

7 months ago

kghjnks said: “strictly “out in the field, designing things, and building them by hand” job like I thought it was.
I’ve always loved working with my hands and creating things, and I’m very crafty. These aspects also came into play when I was deciding on a major/career and lead me straight to engineering. I wanted to create things, invent, and build things the way I wanted them, but that is exactly everything engineering is not.
Engineering is sitting at a desk for 8+ hours a day designing things by strict standards and regulations that leave no room for creativity and thinking outside the box. It’s not working in the field and adding your own spin on things, like I wished it was.
I ended up leaving after a year. So, PLEASE don’t ever think you are inferior to STEM majors because it’s the same 9-5 job everyone else has.

Engineering may have been that way in the past, when technology was simpler and required smaller supply chains.

Now, because of the complexity of current technology, and the capital required develop and make the simplest thing, it is subject to a lot of regulation and standards, as there a lot of stakeholders now than in the past.

The myth that education industry perpetuates is that it makes students think they will be valued for their creativity or work ethic in the job market. The only people consistently valued for those things are executives at corporations or at startups. The executives have the money of rich people to play with, if they aren't rich themselves.

Co-ops could be a solution, but they require workers making serious commitments to each other in addition to investing considerable amounts of money that they may or may or may not have.

RyanB91 in Palos Hills, Illinois

7 months ago

Marlie in Gibsonia, Pennsylvania said: This sounds a lot like me right now

I’m in the same boat with you guys word for word. Graduated 3 years ago and don’t know what to do.

RyanB91 in Palos Hills, Illinois

7 months ago

TumbleWeedArea in Colorado Springs, Colorado said: @Averagegirl your story is very relatable. I Graduated College in summer of 2014 with a BA in Mass Communications . The degree isn't worth the ink its printed on.. should have been a major red flag when your college professors are telling you the field is dying and pay is horrible... demoralizing experience

I had parents who essentially blackmailed me into enrolling at a local state university right out of high school because like you said "oh the places you'll go"... "you just need a degree...any degree". Taking a year off of high school or getting a 2 year degree just wasn't enough/out of the question for my parents.

So here I am 5 years later ... no career... never made over 15 bucks an hour even with a degree and am stagnating living in a small town. (all this on top of major family drama including death of relatives etc.)

I totally can also relate to the "disappointed parents" thing. They just can't understand why I don't have a "career" and aren't making 70k a year. In retrospect i honestly cant believe how outdated/stupid parents can be. High school kids are getting scammed by universities big time! No understanding of how the real economy works at 18 years old!!

I have pretty much conceded that if I ever plan on making a true livable wage ill have to likely transition completely out of low end office jobs/ clerical work. What ill do next I'm not sure.

wish I knew about stuff like dental hygiene back when my parents were willing to pay for college

I’m right with you and by god did you hit it all on the nose. Graduated in 2015 with a communications degree and can’t find anything I want to do. Had a temp administrative role and just don’t want to do it for the garbage pay. This app is riddled with low end clerical/office jobs. Why? Nobody wants to do them. I’m just as lost as everyone here.

exhuastedpigeon in Mesa, Arizona

6 months ago

I found this thread by chance by typing in, "I have a bachelor's degree and I don't know what to do." Go figure. I don't know if anyone's still keeping track of it, but I feel all of this. I just graduated this May with a BA in Mass Communication and Media Studies (managed to finish within three years). A lot of pressure from my mom to go right into college, I didn't exactly know what I wanted to do, so I originally went into Journalism until I realized I did not want to deal with being a beat reporter in a small outlet for decades. It's such a saturated field. Where I went to college, everyone was competitive, and "collaboration" was just a cover story. Everyone was clawing for a coveted spot at some internship or news outlet, and most of us drowned.

Dramatics aside, this degree isn't worth anything without experience and it feels impossible to get a foot in the door anywhere. On top of that, I really don't want to do anything with PR or such. I'm really introverted, quiet, and social situations make me anxious. I'm working a part-time retail job right now during late evenings, which is the time I usually like to use to read, write, and just breathe. I'm cooped up in the house most of the time and I've lost all my friendships, so networking is out of the question and I feel like I'm going stir-crazy. Like a lot of previous posts, I wish I could have taken a gap year or figured out what I really wanted before delving into college. It's embarrassing to work in the same town you grew up in after garnering so much praise of "how impressive you are" and "everything you'll do in life." It sucks to watch your peers become successful and fall so easily into their careers. I just don't get it.

Sorry to just add to the pity party. Just emphasizing that you aren't alone.

ArtsySam in Mineral Point, Wisconsin

5 months ago

Whatdoido in Michigan said: Tell me if there's something I can add to help you help me.

Yo,

You're really not alone. I'm in the same boat too, kind of. I just graduated from college with a degree in fine art because it was always my dream to be an artist. And ended up becoming burnt out because of the demands of the major. Like, thirteen hour days were not uncommon.

But the thing I learned the most was to balance out work and life so I didn't burn out. I'm not sure if this would help, but maybe trying to balance out your work and life with something that's less demanding might be better?

And it's difficult to practice what you love when you're always busy and tired. But maybe try fitting in five or ten minutes after work to just jam out or listen to tunes you wanna listen to. It's not much, but it could help.

It might also be a good idea to reach out to friends and family for support. I can understand what it feels like to not have a whole lot of confidence in one's self. It makes it easier to isolate yourself from other people. But if you have a loving family and friends who care for you, they may be able to help you out.

Again, this is just advice, and you don't have to take it if you don't want to. But, I hope things go well. And as long as you do what you want to do, there's not as much problem with working a so-so job?

toddlakes in Secaucus, New Jersey

5 months ago

Lack of work experience. Literally, everyone faces this problem. Often, large companies want to see on the staff of their employees' ready professionals who will not need to be taught. But fortunately, there are still those employers who believe that it will be easier for them to teach a “beginner” than to retrain a professional to meet the requirements and needs of the company. With writing a resume, you can be helped by a professional custom essay writing service. One such service is the paperial.com/custom-essay-writing-service This approach is becoming more and more popular and according to statistics, 66% of employers are ready to take on a candidate with no work experience (in the USA this percentage is even higher), the only thing you will need to do is a long assessment interview and testing. It often happens that a person cannot get a job, because he really does not want to work or is afraid of responsibility, and perhaps associates this moment with the final maturity and resists it. The presence of an academic degree will be very useful. These are the most popular reasons, but in fact, there may be many of them, and everyone’s solution is one. Do not hesitate to little-known companies that are ready to take you, but can not pay you high wages. Here you can get invaluable work experience, and possibly a letter of recommendation.

SalmomEye in Denton, Texas

2 months ago

Another voice in the "same" choir. Except I did take years off school, went to community, got a general studies degree, and thought I would do well to get a bachelors.

I never found any passion or "calling" and grow to hate anything after about a year. Cant stay interested in anything. No skill or knack for anything. I stuck with a major because I was so, so close to graduating. Now with a degree in Emergency Administration, there are no jobs and the few there are do not want me because I feel like I didnt learn a single thing at school. What the heck did I DO there? I learned sociology, not anything the field expects. Waste.

I should have stopped at my associate's. Now I am 29 and looking at 30k in student loan debt, working a 20 hour a week job at $9/hour. Forever. All my money goes to living in a shthole. My credit is scrwed forever. I will never unburden myself from that debt beast. I would never recommend universities. High schoolers and transfer students beware.

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