Job Opening is Re-posted. Should I Apply Again?

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Will in Buffalo, New York

69 months ago

I did two phone interviews for a position, HR and the hiring manager. I received an email rejection letter. I did send an email to the hiring manager saying I was disappointed to not be continuing in the interviewing process and thanking them for the interview opportunity. This was about two months ago. Today I noticed the job has been reposted. Should I re-apply. I am very well qualified for the position.

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John in MD in Catonsville, Maryland

69 months ago

I think you pretty will summed it up..... at the fact that you got a rejection letter. To me, it doesn't matter how qualified I think I am, if a company specifically says "no thanks", it's time to apply for other jobs and forget about the one you didn't get.

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UUinPa in Pennsylvania

69 months ago

John in MD in Catonsville, Maryland said: I think you pretty will summed it up..... at the fact that you got a rejection letter. To me, it doesn't matter how qualified I think I am, if a company specifically says "no thanks", it's time to apply for other jobs and forget about the one you didn't get.

I agree. I used to see this all the time with jobs I got rejected for. I eventually figured either it wasn't a position they were readily looking to fill or that they were having a huge turnover and maybe the rejection was a godsend. Move on.

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Tiffiney O in Northbrook, Illinois

69 months ago

If the job is reposted two months later, then more than likely it wasn't a real job to begin with. It sounds like you were a victim of the "fake interview".

This has happened to me a number of times, you see a job that fits you perfectly, you apply, they call you, you get interviewed, you get rejected, and yet the job remains on their web site for months, or is reposted months later.

This means they are just "window shopping", they are not really serious about hiring anyone for this position.

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John in MD in Catonsville, Maryland

69 months ago

Almost Suicidal in Houston, Texas said: I respectfully disagree with the responses so far. I have had the experience of being offered a position the second time around. I think it showed them I was really interested in working there. Unless there is a disclaimer like: continued search previous applicants need not reapply, then I would say you have nothing to lose by giving it another try.

If there had been no response from the company, I would say the same thing. But, seeing how the OP got a rejection email, that would indicate to me that the company reviewed the applicant into and decided he was not a good fit.

But (again), seeing as I have been unemployed for years, what the heck do I know?

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AtExit8 in City, New Jersey

69 months ago

I have applied to a few companies in the area repeatedly.
Twice I have been offered in-person interviews.

It doesn't hurt to re-apply.
However, also don't be surprised if they are merely "shopping around".

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Torn in Morehead, Kentucky

69 months ago

NeedNJ in Michigan said: It doesn't hurt to apply again, but I agree with John. You think you are qualified. They've met with you and disagree. 2 months most likely hasn't changed their minds. What you may want to try is reaching ou to the hiring manager and ask what you fell short on. Then you know how to better position your resume and yourself if you reapply.

And I have to disagree with the idea that a reposting after a couple of months means it is fake. Things happen. People don't show up to work. Or they take a different job. Or they fail a drug test. Or funding causes a job to be put on hold.

Not necessarily, it is possible they hired someone else the first time around who they just felt was MORE qualified or I have even seen situations where less qualified people were given the job because they thought he would be a better fit to the work environment.

It could be that they had another identical position open up or that the person hired the first time around didn't work out. I'm just saying they didn't necessarily dislike the OP. If it were me I would apply again.

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You all know my name by now... in Silver Spring, Maryland

69 months ago

I'm in a sort of similar situation. I interviewed for a job last week (they said that they were interviewing 3 candidates). Today, I saw what looked to be the identical job advertised but at the next higher pay grade. The deadline is on Friday, so they are giving at most a week to apply (it might have been posted on Friday). Does that mean that they didn't like any of the candidates and think that they have to raise the pay scale to find someone better? Or do they think that the person whom they've chosen won't work for the original salary scale and want to be able to offer more money?

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Bluetea in Texas

69 months ago

NeedNJ in Michigan said: Unlikely on both accounts. Contrary to the conspiracy theories you read around here, companies don't like to open up positions for kicks. It ties up time and resources, therefore money, in reviewing applications, scheduling interviews, etc. If they had their second choice or someone that they likes that they spoke to 2 months ago, and a new position (or the old one) became available, they would be reaching out to see if he was still interested and skip the whole charade.

If several months past (someone mentioned they got hired after 5-6 months), then it is more likely that the employer has seen what is available on the market vs what they posted, and has made adjustments. Not very likely in only 2 months.

But applying again cannot hurt. I wouldn't put any eggs in this particular basket, however.

True for the most part. My sister says that they keep the top contenders around for about a month, even after a hire. Should several months go by and should the position open up again, they just run the ad again and get a whole new batch of ravenous applicants all chomping at the trough.

That said, seeing an ad running over and over and over again is usually a bad sign. That is usually indicative of The Job From Hell. Been there.

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Indie_One in Wichita, Kansas

69 months ago

You could reapply. What have you got to lose? Maybe they’ll reconsider.

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Will in Buffalo, New York

69 months ago

Thanks everyone for your input. I appreciate all the input.

This is a real job. The last person was let go (I asked and the HR person told me). The job description has not changed. When I interviewed with them, they emphasized I was the only local candidate being considered for the position. The hiring managers feeling was the ideal candidate would bring experience from outside this market. When they rejected me I thought good luck finding a quality candidate to relocate to Buffalo in January for a job with a company that is in a very competitive marketplace and is the underdog. Now I noticed they posted a another position for an existing position in the same department. I'm thinking they have some organizational issues. Maybe I dodged a bullet on this one.

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BetterLuckNextLife in Albany, New York

69 months ago

Almost Suicidal in Houston, Texas said: I respectfully disagree with the responses so far. I have had the experience of being offered a position the second time around. I think it showed them I was really interested in working there. Unless there is a disclaimer like: continued search previous applicants need not reapply, then I would say you have nothing to lose by giving it another try.

I know of two instances - people very close to me - wherein the person doing the hiring was axed. Both people were excellent candidates and got hired the second time around.

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BetterLuckNextLife in Albany, New York

69 months ago

....the second time around, after the management changed.

I really think it's a 50/50 deal. Some businesses are in enough flux that a different person may be making the hiring decision the second time around.

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Anonymous in Memphis, Tennessee

69 months ago

Usually when I reapply after I get rejected for the same job, I get rejected again during some stage of the interview process. It hasn't worked out for me yet.

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Anonymous in Irving, Texas

55 months ago

I was offered a job; I countered the offer as the hiring manager new my existing salary. I had great reviews by all that interviewed me. Hiring manager said she would talk with CEO that night and follow up with HR. It's been 4-weeks since I received offer and she has not replied to my email follow-up. She told me in the interview that she does not micromanage nor fluff things up. The job has now been reposted and with a much higher salary range. Does HR have to do this when the offer goes beyond previously listed position?

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lajmh in Chelmsford, Massachusetts

52 months ago

I too have questioned about it.

I've notice the same position posted again, and again...and again. Another reason is that maybe there is a high turnover rate.

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antpooh in Los Angeles, California

49 months ago

Tiffiney O in Northbrook, Illinois said: If the job is reposted two months later, then more than likely it wasn't a real job to begin with. It sounds like you were a victim of the "fake interview".

This has happened to me a number of times, you see a job that fits you perfectly, you apply, they call you, you get interviewed, you get rejected, and yet the job remains on their web site for months, or is reposted months later.

This means they are just "window shopping", they are not really serious about hiring anyone for this position.

Seriously??? How often does this occur where they just bring in potential candidates but din't have an attention to hire at that point.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

49 months ago

antpooh in Los Angeles, California said: Seriously??? How often does this occur where they just bring in potential candidates but din't have an attention to hire at that point.

More than you know. You can never be as qualified as the manager's new son-in-law. If there is an internal candidate, they are just covering their a$$es to keep their EEO poster.

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antpooh in Los Angeles, California

49 months ago

Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada said: More than you know. You can never be as qualified as the manager's new son-in-law. If there is an internal candidate, they are just covering their a$$es to keep their EEO poster.

The EEO poster? This is the second time I've heard about companies interviewing for EEO compliance. As I am African-American and been on 24 interviews with no offer and someone said it could be the recruiter or internal HR seeking a qualified minority to interview in order to maintain EEO compliance. Is that true?

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Sachi in North Carolina

49 months ago

antpooh in Los Angeles, California said: The EEO poster? This is the second time I've heard about companies interviewing for EEO compliance. As I am African-American and been on 24 interviews with no offer and someone said it could be the recruiter or internal HR seeking a qualified minority to interview in order to maintain EEO compliance. Is that true?

I think so. I too am African-American and with one company I had a phone interview... I waited a whole week for a phone interview that lasted five mins. They asked "Tell me about yourself." I gave a good answer. Then they told me some info about the job. Then that was it. Next day, rejection email. They were never serious about considering me. For one week, I thought I had a chance at this company... silly me. I had no chance. They used me to meet a diversity quota.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

49 months ago

antpooh in Los Angeles, California said: The EEO poster? This is the second time I've heard about companies interviewing for EEO compliance. As I am African-American and been on 24 interviews with no offer and someone said it could be the recruiter or internal HR seeking a qualified minority to interview in order to maintain EEO compliance. Is that true?

If you have ever had to fill out the Diversity portion of an online application, it is. That is part of their EEO compliance reporting. They aren't asking those questions because they have nothing better to do.

If they hire too many white people who are related, they lose their EEO logo. Heh!

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Burt Lange in Albany, New York

49 months ago

I'm sure there's lots of reasons why companies repost jobs.

There's a local jobsite that I use - Regional Help Wanted - and they always post an inside sales position for this jobsite. Maybe they just post it to advertise their jobsite or when they don't have too many jobs to advertise??? Or they are getting county tax breaks if they show they are trying to hire so many people this yr?????

Lotta games I'm sure.

Just got my rejection letter for an interview I did pretty good on. Wonder why????

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JR in Trenton, New Jersey

26 months ago

I was once interviewed by a hiring manager with three months experience for a position I would have been perfect for. This person obviously didn’t have much (or any) eye for talent as they allowed me to leave the interview without making me an offer that I couldn’t refuse. Months later the same position was re-posted and I simply laughed they could have had someone who would have been great and would have stuck around but decided to give me the old “we’ll be in touch” where I never heard from them again. My advice is be careful what information you confide in these people they are not your friends. I told this person that I was more or less “tired” of working in a room by myself all day and wanted to return to regularly working and interacting with other people.” I guess they took great pleasure in denying me this job therefore forcing me to continue working alone for at least a little while longer.

Most of these hiring mangers couldn’t see talent if it kicked them in the side of the head and most probably got their own positions by knowing someone or doing someone a “favor” so don’t feel bad if they reject you. Employers who employ people like this, people who lack vision don’t deserve to attract and retain great talent and won’t unless/until things change.

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Struggling to Find Full-Time Work in Silver Spring, Maryland

25 months ago

I've seen many jobs that I applied to that either rejected or ignored me be posted again after a matter of months. It does seem like these people aren't the best at hiring. I don't bother applying again. I doubt their opinion of my application would change in a matter of months.

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AndyRising in a State of Bliss

25 months ago

They rejected you once, but that doesn't necessarily mean that they'll reject you again. It's possible that their needs have changed and you have a new shot at the job. I would look over my cover letter and resume to see whether I need to make changes, and then re-apply.

I just set up an interview for a job that's been re-posted two or three times. I applied each time, and finally scored this time. Doesn't mean I got the job, but I'm a step closer.

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JR in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

AndyRising in a State of Bliss said: They rejected you once, but that doesn't necessarily mean that they'll reject you again. It's possible that their needs have changed and you have a new shot at the job. I would look over my cover letter and resume to see whether I need to make changes, and then re-apply.

I just set up an interview for a job that's been re-posted two or three times. I applied each time, and finally scored this time. Doesn't mean I got the job, but I'm a step closer.

In my experience, it’s very rare for a company that rejects you to give you another chance. Not saying it can’t happen after some time has passed and there’s been some turnover in HR maybe the company is going under or at least downhill and the standards aren’t as high as they once were. If the same HR staff remains chances are a lot of them will have a long memory and will remember (maybe not off of the top of their heads) that they interviewed and rejected you before and you may not make it past the screening phase next time around. Views of your tenacity may be mixed as well, some may see you as “determined and unwilling to easily give up and take no for an answer” others however may view you as a “pest or an annoyance who simply can’t take a hint that they aren’t wanted here.”

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Johnny Boy in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

Be wary of companies that seem a little too eager to interview you. I had several companies call me within hours or days (one person even called me pretty much immediately) after I submitted my resume and application. I doubt they even had time to read the entire thing. No hard feelings, but even though the interviews were great, I never got any offers and feel like I was used to meet quotas and help interviewers sharpen their skills. Some of these were for retail positions and looking around the stores at the times of the interviews they looked like ghost towns. Maybe they are different at other times on other days, but when I was there interviewing there was pretty much no one in terms of customers and sales associates were just hanging around passing the time. Perhaps interviewing me gave these people something to do on an other wise lazy and boring weekday afternoon.

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Pazzer15 in Fort Mill, South Carolina

25 months ago

I recently interviewed for a position that I was not selected for, though I was a finalist and a "strong candidate" and they were "very impressed with" me (recruiters words, not mine). Recruiter told me that if any positions open up that I'm interested in, to let him know and they'd see if it was a good fit. Now, a new position, slightly different that one I interviewed for has opened up. I am very much interested in this position. The problem? The hiring manager brought up this different position to me during my initial interview, I told him I had reservations about it and was more interested in the one I was there interviewing for. Is there any way to recover from this? Honestly, my reservations about this other position were lessened as the series of interviews went on and I learned there would be a good deal of training associated with it. Thanks for advice.

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AtExit8 in City, New Jersey

25 months ago

Pazzer15 in Fort Mill, South Carolina said: I recently interviewed for a position that I was not selected for, though I was a finalist and a "strong candidate" and they were "very impressed with" me (recruiters words, not mine). Recruiter told me that if any positions open up that I'm interested in, to let him know and they'd see if it was a good fit. Now, a new position, slightly different that one I interviewed for has opened up. I am very much interested in this position. The problem? The hiring manager brought up this different position to me during my initial interview, I told him I had reservations about it and was more interested in the one I was there interviewing for. Is there any way to recover from this? Honestly, my reservations about this other position were lessened as the series of interviews went on and I learned there would be a good deal of training associated with it. Thanks for advice.

It doesn't hurt to try. That's my mom's motto.
You have nothing to lose except the time spent re-submitting your resume.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

AtExit8 in City, New Jersey said: It doesn't hurt to try. That's my mom's motto.
You have nothing to lose except the time spent re-submitting your resume.

Unless the hiring manager/human resource person has a really poor memory, they are going to remember people who stand out for the right or wrong reasons. So re-applying may simply remind them why they didn’t select you before and might even cause them to view you as a “desperate loser” For not finding another job during that time frame as opposed to reapplying with them.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

Rick in Trenton, New Jersey said: Unless the hiring manager/human resource person has a really poor memory, they are going to remember people who stand out for the right or wrong reasons. So re-applying may simply remind them why they didn’t select you before and might even cause them to view you as a “desperate loser” For not finding another job during that time frame as opposed to reapplying with them.

And the longer you wait to re-apply may actually be a bad thing. Let’s say you interviewed and were rejected back in January, it’s now October nearly a year later and you are still in the same situation, either jobless or stuck in a job you really want to get out of. The interviewer is definitely going to call you out on still being in the exact same situation you were in when last they left you.

Interviewer: You mean to tell me you couldn’t find another job during these last 9 months? What exactly is your major malfunction?

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Running on Empty in St Louis, Missouri

25 months ago

Rick in Trenton, New Jersey said: And the longer you wait to re-apply may actually be a bad thing. Let’s say you interviewed and were rejected back in January, it’s now October nearly a year later and you are still in the same situation, either jobless or stuck in a job you really want to get out of. The interviewer is definitely going to call you out on still being in the exact same situation you were in when last they left you.

Interviewer: You mean to tell me you couldn’t find another job during these last 9 months? What exactly is your major malfunction?

Although I too do show discretion in how often I re-apply, I don't see any value in taking it as far as you do. Since there is a finite number of local employers, chances are you will re-apply at some point to the same employer.

I had a 2-year permanent role that recently ended. Guess what; many same positions listed that were 2+ years ago. Should I limit my opportunities by speculating that the HR person didn't also turn over since I last applied? I'm not willing to pass up that opportunity.

Yes, there are employers that either create fake listings/hire from within 90% of the time (but are required to list), have ATS systems that eliminate 98% of applicants.........but not applying will never get you hired. So use discretion (don't re-apply weekly or call incessantly, but do feel free to re-apply every 6 months or so (no reason why the same opening would remain unfilled), change up your resume or cover letter (be careful not to change emplyment dates or titles) and keep a positive attitude.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

Not sure if this is simply my own experience, but I find that if you make it to the interview round, get rejected and reapply down the line should a similar or the same position open up again, you might not even make it to the interview round the next time. It feels a lot like playing an old school video game where you have a good run and fight your way to the level boss, but barely come up short and then subsequently for whatever reason can’t make it back to the level boss again.

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Running on Empty in St Louis, Missouri

25 months ago

So what do you feel are your next step options? I've got a few limited resources that should keep me off the streets until my next stop. Many other unemployed or chronic unemployed are facing worse than unemployment check-to-unemployment check living terms. Telling them it's no use to re-apply may be a disservice if that's all that is currently available.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

runningonempty in St Louis, Missouri said: So what do you feel are your next step options? I've got a few limited resources that should keep me off the streets until my next stop. Many other unemployed or chronic unemployed are facing worse than unemployment check-to-unemployment check living terms. Telling them it's no use to re-apply may be a disservice if that's all that is currently available.

What sense does it really make to reapply if the employer has already decided they aren’t going to hire you? What can you really do to change their minds and make them give you a second look? If you feel you have more skills, more education, more experience this time around go for it. But if nothing has changed you could reapply five-six times and you’ll get five-six rejection letters and perhaps a few cease and desists with the potential employer viewing you as more desperate and less favorable. I’m a highly skilled, multi talented former entrepreneur who decided to sell a successful business. After a few years in retirement, I decided to return to the general workforce, complete strangers have decided up until at least this point that I’m staying retired whether I want to be or not. I know a lot of people are far worse off than me, but if someone with my talents, experience and abilities can’t find work if they desire to do so than the economy is still in pretty bad shape.

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Running on Empty in St Louis, Missouri

25 months ago

Again, I'm not questioning your personal decision. I to am very frustrated in the 2010's world we live in. Back in the 90's, I could pick & choose among several interviews and what best fit ME. I was the boss of my career. Today, not even close.

For about 2 minutes, I was jealous of those Millennials now in HR/hiring roles. Then I realized, their job is so much more susceptible than mine ever was. And they are 20+ years younger than me. I can't imagine intentionally changing jobs every 2-3 years. Sad, sad World.

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Running on Empty in St Louis, Missouri

25 months ago

Sorry I replied to your prior comment. We are probably more alike than different. Our world simply sucks. My new perspective is our children's world will suck more. Glad both of us wont have to be as concerned about our direct contribution to that cause.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

I remember a time when if a person wanted and/or needed a job they could simply walk into a business that may or may not have had a help wanted sign on the window and asked for an application, they’d either fill it out then and there or would bring it back at which point a manager would speak to them about it and perhaps even offer them a job on the spot. These days it’s fill out a lengthy application and submit a resume online and maybe they’ll get back to you if you’re lucky. If they do you may have to go through a few rounds of screening interviews before even speaking to a person who can actually make you an offer should you even make it that far. It seems a lot like auditioning for a spot on a reality television show these days.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

And getting an interview and having it seemingly go great is no guarantee of getting an offer. I’ve lost count of how many “great” job interviews I have had this past year alone that have not resulted in offers. I really hit it off with the interviewers and seemed to be exactly who they are looking for, they’d say “I’ll be in touch” and that’s the last I ever heard from them. So even if you get an interview it isn’t the “given” that it was at one time where if you got that far you were pretty much “in” those days are gone.
To take it a step further I signed what appeared to be new hire documents that specified the date of my hire and what position I was to be in no idea why they made me sign these and then followed them up with a rejection letter instead of an offer.

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AtExit8 in City, New Jersey

25 months ago

Rick in Trenton, New Jersey said: I really hit it off with the interviewers and seemed to be exactly who they are looking for

And this YOUR impression.

You have no idea what the interviewer really thinks.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

I did ask for feedback a few times and the interviewers have concurred that it was a “good/great” interview and there was nothing wrong with my interview skills, but often I was either neck and neck with someone and it came down to preferred and required qualifications, other times someone was already hired prior to my interview. I may have been lied to/humored but have no reason to believe that I was. I do find it strange that if they “liked me” as well as they said that they did that they wouldn’t find another position for me or interview me for another position I applied to.

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Rick in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

I do feel a sense of guilt in getting interviews but not getting offers as it means other people were bumped and didn’t even get interviews, only for me to not close the deal whether there was really anything I could have done differently or not. I’m older, have saved/invested wisely and have a side business doing odd jobs for people so I’m not really in the desperate situation others are. If I were, I’d be really annoyed at being interviewed for a job I never had a shot at (didn’t know it at the time.) but in the situation I’m in now, it’s a learning, growing experience for the next time.

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ghutsta in San Francisco, California

25 months ago

Rick in Trenton, New Jersey said: I do feel a sense of guilt in getting interviews but not getting offers as it means other people were bumped and didn’t even get interviews, only for me to not close the deal whether there was really anything I could have done differently or not. I’m older, have saved/invested wisely and have a side business doing odd jobs for people so I’m not really in the desperate situation others are. If I were, I’d be really annoyed at being interviewed for a job I never had a shot at (didn’t know it at the time.) but in the situation I’m in now, it’s a learning, growing experience for the next time.

thats not guilt, thats disappointment, guilt is when you feel remorse for something you have but someone doesnt. Anyways, i do not know why people are so obsessed with trying to applying to the same job they either got no response or rejected from, if they arnt hiring you the first time they are even less likely to hire you if you apply again, since they have all your information. I read around, and a person was so obssesed with a job, that he said how to get hired if "i already been to many of the interviews, and dint get hired".
To people who are obssesed, what has changed between the last interview, and the 2nd time you are trying to apply, did you get more experience or skills in that timeframe.

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Jono in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

If they reject you three or more times you might want to consider moving on as chances are they aren’t even reading your materials anymore and may view you as “begging”. There may be limited local employers where certain people live, but I doubt there is only one employer that the person can work for. Try somewhere you haven’t applied before as opposed to badgering an employer who obviously doesn’t want you.

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Jono in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

I would go as far as personally blacklisting the companies (on my own list) that rejected me three or more times and then specifically not applying there again. The only way I would consider working for them after that point, is if they came to me on bended knee and made me a sweet offer that I couldn’t refuse. I’m a very forgiving man but that forgiveness comes at a price.

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Career Coach (iandboreham.com) in Sydney, Australia

25 months ago

Will in Buffalo, New York said: I did two phone interviews for a position, HR and the hiring manager. I received an email rejection letter. I did send an email to the hiring manager saying I was disappointed to not be continuing in the interviewing process and thanking them for the interview opportunity. This was about two months ago. Today I noticed the job has been reposted. Should I re-apply. I am very well qualified for the position.

I think there are 2 approaches here. 1. Cut your losses and move on. 2. Get back in touch and assess whether they are still genuinely looking for a role. Although option 1 seems like the obvious one, you have very little to lose with option 2. If they are still genuinely struggling to find someone suitable then there view of 'suitable' may have flexed a little. For strategy 2 to be really effective, ideally you would try and gather some insider info as to what is really going on as well as addressing any issues that caused them to overlook you the previous time.

In short, you have nothing to lose but time and effort. If you can get in direct contact with the hiring manager and think of how you can address their initial concerns then you may have an outside chance.

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Jono in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

The reason for these job repostings could also be that the employers are just too damn picky. They are essentially “holding out for a hero” who may or may not actually exist in reality. It makes me sick really how beggars can in fact and usually are choosers in their world, and although the job seeker could use a job sometime last week the companies don’t really seem to be in much of a hurry to actually fill the position anytime soon or even at all.

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Jono in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

I recall several years ago (before smart phones) coming home from an interview and checking my e-mail on my computer, what did I find? Was it an offer? No of course not, it was a rejection letter time stamped right before I was taken into the office to have my interview. They never intended to make me an offer regardless of how the interview went, they just wanted to scratch my name off of the list and say that they interview me (even though technically they rejected me before/during the interview.)

Another company blacklisted me (or so it seems) for making one, teeny, tiny, mistake during the interview. It was for a position at a store within a store and looking around when asked “what do you know about our company?” I inadvertently started repeating facts about the store that this other store I was interviewing with was located inside of as opposed to things about the store within a store, I corrected myself and we both laughed. This is where I realized reapplying isn’t always fruitful. I was rejected numerous times (even though I tailored my resume and cover letter and really tried to make my qualifications stand out, but I still kept getting the same canned rejection letter telling me “there isn’t really a match between this position and your skillset even though we didn’t even bother to read your resume/cover letter and couldn’t care less if you match the position perfectly, you aren’t getting it.

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mooty in San Francisco, California

25 months ago

Jono in Trenton, New Jersey::
I think when you apply, you are actually entering your info into thier database, when they do reject you, which is majority of the time, they have your resume on database, and this allows them to automatically blacklist you from thier company(they just use your resume to scan thier database for similar resumes and then autoreject you). I had incidence where when i applied to a job in the bay area, through no fault of the recruiters own, She told me the Job search on the HR side was frozen, i dint inquire why, but i got a bad vibe about it.
Another thing job reposting is not the employers fault, Its sites like these, they tend to recycle 30+day old posts. On the other hand the employers themselves are the blame, i admit myself i have tried reapplying to same place. 1 was for exploratorium, but i never got a response, but a few months later, it reappears with the job description that has been upgraded, It adds 1+ more of experience than the previous post it did, so thats a slap in the face. For them holding out the "ideal candidate" i think its more of fishing for thier "right candidate". Or the ad-posting is just a front for these HR deparments to look like they are doing work, and justifying thier usefulness. The best methods of getting hire is through a connection with the company, or someone who you know who will immediately get you an INTERVIEW despite not having most of the qualifications, i have friend who was offered this way.
On a post on another forum, there was a person that asked how to reapply to company that just rejected me, he get really offended that he cant even apply to it, and mentioned his medical condition played a hand. If you get rejected move on to the next job.
companies can blacklist you for anything, you dont live close enough, or have a gap in your history, or you dont have what they want.

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Jono in Trenton, New Jersey

25 months ago

This is probably largely the case (that people who reapply are likely auto rejected) and it’s a shame really. There were times where I applied for multiple positions with the same companies and took the time to use tailored resumes/applications and cover letters for each position I applied for. I was often “no longer under consideration” within a matter of hours or days without even being contacted about coming in for an interview. I doubt any person took the time to read my materials as there is no way someone who actually read it would dismiss someone who matched the position (based on the listing anyway) to a tee so quickly.

I also would like to apologize for the vagueness of my last post. The point I was attempting to make is that I wouldn’t be so quick to reapply to companies that would treat people this way and if what people have said is true (“you’re one and done with most of these places if they don’t hire you now they never will.”) reapplying may be pointless anyway.

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