Terrified to give two weeks notice.

Comments (11)

Marie in Denver, Colorado

62 months ago

Where I work now, the coworkers are like family. There's only 3 of us in the department and I share an office with my immediate supervisor. The office manager just left last week and most of her work has been given to my supervisor--she's already overworked and my leaving would create even more problems for her. The timing couldn't be worse, but I was offered a job with much better pay, benefits, 401k matching, paid time off, opportunity to advance, the works. My current job has no benefits and I'm barely breaking even each month.

I basically don't even know how to start the topic with her. I was hired by the big boss (not my supervisor) and he's said that he thinks of me like a daughter, so I don't know if I need to tell him first. Supervisor or owner of the company? I know I need to do it tomorrow (Monday), but I come in at noon on Mondays, right when things start to get busy for the day. If I tell either of them as soon as I come in, it's just going to ruin the day. If I tell my supervisor first it won't be such a nasty shock, but if I tell the owner, I'll be able to give him my side of the story without worrying that my supervisor will talk to him first.

I'm afraid my supervisor will be angry with me for leaving at such a chaotic time. I'm afraid the owner of the company will be angry with me too. Should I tell them both at the end of the day after everyone has left? Should I send an email tonight and talk about it in person tomorrow at noon? Is it always this difficult?!

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

62 months ago

Marie in Denver, Colorado said: My current job has no benefits and I'm barely breaking even each month.

I am not sure there is a question here.

How you handle it is up to you but if the shoe were on the other foot, they would lay you off in a heartbeat. Never buy the "we're a family" spiel.

What is important is that you never quit a job out of spite or in an emotional uproar. You want to quit on the best conditions that are possible for you. They may not be ideal but that isn't your problem.

Finally, do make sure that at some point, your 2 week notice is in writing with a copy to yourself. You may need those people as a reference one day.

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Andromeda Rising in Rockbridge, Ohio

62 months ago

Absolutely agree with everything Ruby says.

And consider that during the course of your life there will be lots of partings. Some will be personal, and some will be professional. In each case, you have to consider yourself (and your family) first. No matter how they express it, no one at work is really "family."

Oh, and they've had people quit before. They'll struggle along somehow.

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Ruby Slippers in Las Vegas, Nevada

62 months ago

Andromeda Rising in Rockbridge, Ohio said: Absolutely agree with everything Ruby says.

And consider that during the course of your life there will be lots of partings. Some will be personal, and some will be professional. In each case, you have to consider yourself (and your family) first. No matter how they express it, no one at work is really "family."

Oh, and they've had people quit before. They'll struggle along somehow.

I agree. They will manage.

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Leeann66 in crap happens, Ontario

62 months ago

Marie in Denver, Colorado said: Where I work now, the coworkers are like family. There's only 3 of us in the department and I share an office with my immediate supervisor. The office manager just left last week and most of her work has been given to my supervisor--she's already overworked and my leaving would create even more problems for her. The timing couldn't be worse, but I was offered a job with much better pay, benefits, 401k matching, paid time off, opportunity to advance, the works. My current job has no benefits and I'm barely breaking even each month.

I basically don't even know how to start the topic with her. I was hired by the big boss (not my supervisor) and he's said that he thinks of me like a daughter, so I don't know if I need to tell him first. Supervisor or owner of the company? I know I need to do it tomorrow (Monday), but I come in at noon on Mondays, right when things start to get busy for the day. If I tell either of them as soon as I come in, it's just going to ruin the day. If I tell my supervisor first it won't be such a nasty shock, but if I tell the owner, I'll be able to give him my side of the story without worrying that my supervisor will talk to him first.

I'm afraid my supervisor will be angry with me for leaving at such a chaotic time. I'm afraid the owner of the company will be angry with me too. Should I tell them both at the end of the day after everyone has left? Should I send an email tonight and talk about it in person tomorrow at noon? Is it always this difficult?!

Sometimes we do tend to feel like our co-workers are part of our family. You were really fortunate to be able to have people you enjoyed working with.

I would speak to the owner of the company first. Send an email today and tell him you need to speak with him in person on Monday. He will figure it out before the meeting anyways. Then, it won't be such a shock to him when you see him. I think the owner would appreciate knowing first.

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BetterLuck in Cohoes, New York

62 months ago

Just think how happy you'll make the person who'll be getting your old job. Maybe it'll help someone who's been out of a job for awhile.

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Gyspyy88 in san bernardino, California

16 months ago

I'm in same boat I work with 4 people the job easy but the daughter of supervisor does not like me and I feel the mom has change towards me so basically only have one friend lmao but I'm not their to make friends and owner never give opportunity to do other stuff while the one that always late got a promotion and I pass on.. anyways i got job offer at bigger company with better pay and I dont know how to leave current position?? He told us last time if you ever leave hard feeling...I feel if tell him they treat bad last two weeks?? Help

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KA2 in Sydney

16 months ago

Marie in Denver, Colorado said: Where I work now, the coworkers are like family. There's only 3 of us in the department and I share an office with my immediate supervisor. The office manager just left last week and most of her work has been given to my supervisor--she's already overworked and my leaving would create even more problems for her. The timing couldn't be worse, but I was offered a job with much better pay, benefits, 401k matching, paid time off, opportunity to advance, the works. My current job has no benefits and I'm barely breaking even each month.

I basically don't even know how to start the topic with her. I was hired by the big boss (not my supervisor) and he's said that he thinks of me like a daughter, so I don't know if I need to tell him first. Supervisor or owner of the company? I know I need to do it tomorrow (Monday), but I come in at noon on Mondays, right when things start to get busy for the day. If I tell either of them as soon as I come in, it's just going to ruin the day. If I tell my supervisor first it won't be such a nasty shock, but if I tell the owner, I'll be able to give him my side of the story without worrying that my supervisor will talk to him first.

I'm afraid my supervisor will be angry with me for leaving at such a chaotic time. I'm afraid the owner of the company will be angry with me too. Should I tell them both at the end of the day after everyone has left? Should I send an email tonight and talk about it in person tomorrow at noon? Is it always this difficult?!

If they value you so much may be they will match the new offer or give you something better than the new company.

I wouldn't send an email. You can prepare a resignation letter indicating that you will work your notice period. You can tell your immediate supervisor first & then go see the owner immediately after that.

You can also offer to help with training someone else... etc.

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patsnation in Taunton, Massachusetts

16 months ago

You should never hesitate to do what is best for you.

The company would not hesitate to lay you off if it was going to save them money or they could do without you.

Put in your two weeks, and if they make your last two weeks a negative experience, report that to the correct people.

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BrewCrew in Neenah, Wisconsin

16 months ago

I can see how that would be terrifying. Where I work, it's not quite like that. I'm on a team of 20+ and they always like to claim that we're like a family (I never see it). But if I was given an opportunity for better money, benefits and advancement somewhere else, I'd put my 2 weeks in without hesitation. I guess it does help that I hate the company I work for.

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Gypsy889 in Fontana, California

16 months ago

Thank you all for your comments helps a lot for my next step I'm about to do!!

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