Cytology is not a smart career path

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oldschool in Galesburg, Illinois

103 months ago

I have worked 34 years in the same hospital. My pay is very low, but I have the respect of all the doctors in the hospital and especially my pathologist. I am treated with the utmost courtesy by everyone. My husband and I get the greatest personal care when needed and this is worth a great deal. I have changed with the times and have no trouble with yearly inspections. I am chosen often to be on inspection teams at other hospitals. I am sometimes amazed at the lack of organization and knowledge by some of my colleagues. I am very proud of my work through the years and am also thankful for my job. The right cytotechnology job can be extremely rewarding and I am glad I chose this field. If I had it to do over I probably would have become a pathologist, but in those days women in that field were discriminated against.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

103 months ago

The bright future is looking like its gonna be in POD labs. Specialists are wanting control over the revenue from histology/cytology specimens. Not sure if many cytotechs are gonna be employed in those labs or not. I just cant see cytotechs prescreening nongyns at those places. The pathologists will just screen the cases. The private labs will eventually die off so they better enjoy today cause they wont exist someday.

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I agree in Westborough, Massachusetts

103 months ago

Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida said: The bright future is looking like its gonna be in POD labs. Specialists are wanting control over the revenue from histology/cytology specimens. Not sure if many cytotechs are gonna be employed in those labs or not. I just cant see cytotechs prescreening nongyns at those places. The pathologists will just screen the cases. The private labs will eventually die off so they better enjoy today cause they wont exist someday.

Agreed. As it stands now, and has always been the case, cytotechs do not sign out a single non-gyn case without full pathologist review. The proficiency test does not include non-gyns, and there is sound logic behind that. Can you imagine what that would be like? There is only a tiny fraction of cytotechs that are as proficient with non-gyn cases as they are with gyn cases.

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Cytotk in Louisville, Kentucky

102 months ago

dmf in La Crosse, Wisconsin said: you should be grateful for your cyto job; good luck making less than half that much doing something much more uncomfortable

Why is it that when someone on this site has something good to say, everyone lines up to bash them? This person is happy, why do you resent it so much? Misery loves company!

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grateful in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

I think it would be a big mistake to sit back and say "wow, I'm really grateful for my cytology job"........basically, there are 2 reasons for this------
1. It is a dead end terminal job, with very scarce upward mobility.
2. Cytology is "moving to a molecular platform"....TRANSLATION------Your screening skills become less relevant in the marketplace as time goes by.

I agree there are things to be thankful for. I also think there are things that will ultimately stab you in the back that you should run from. Cytology is proving itself the latter more and more.

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be like Mark in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

Mark Kansas in Wichita, Kansas said: As a cytotechnologist for over 10 years I can tell you that this was a very poor career move. As automation has reduced the need for cytotechs the workplace environment has grown ever more hostile, pay has stagnated, and unless you are willing to live somewhere other than where you are now the job propects are very limited. If you are considering a career in cytology - DON'T! If you are a recent graduate do yourself a favor and go back to college. There are plenty of careers where you will not be treated like a feudal serf. If you must for now work in this field stay sway from the corporate labs, they will treat you like dirt and try to ruin your reputation. At the very least you will treated with a complete lack of respect and open hostility. As for me, I am enrolled in an engineering program and can hardly wait until I graduate (again) from college.

BE LIKE MARK !!!!!!!

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OUTSTANDING POST in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

Cytotech in Redondo Beach, California said: I don't think you have a clue as to what you're talking about. If you'll look around you'll notice that cytotechs are losing their jobs left and right. There IS nothing else for them to do BUT go into another field. Which is what I plan on doing soon. I too, am a casualty of the imager, the HPV test, and ridiculous quotas that favor the company and not the patient. Wake up and smell the coffee, dmf. I can only imagine what DMF actually stands for. I know what it SHOULD stand for.

THIS IS A CLASSIC POST!!! WORTHY OF FRAMING !!!!!!!!

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cytotk in Louisville, Kentucky

102 months ago

OUTSTANDING POST in Westborough, Massachusetts said: THIS IS A CLASSIC POST!!! WORTHY OF FRAMING !!!!!!!!

Again, I say why? Why feel the need to bash someone and name call just because they are happy? No one is stopping you from moving on and if someone wants to stay and be grateful for what they have, let them.

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names in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

I am not bashing anybody!!! Not calling anybody names!! Talking about the demise of cytology and the importance of lining up gainful employment for the future!! Putting ones eggs in the cytology basket is going to lead to NO paycheck!! Ones happiness is relative........Im talking about our future paychecks.

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Point out in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

cytotk in Louisville, Kentucky said: Again, I say why? Why feel the need to bash someone and name call just because they are happy? No one is stopping you from moving on and if someone wants to stay and be grateful for what they have, let them.

And I would point out, Kentucky, this is way more than just whether one is happy in cytology or not. This is about a field that is in demise, and the fact that cytotechs, happy or not, need to deal with the fact that their livelihood is dissolving away. "Staying put", because one is happy screening slides, is a recipe for disaster. You've got to look to the future, and it's not so hard to see it in the case of cytology.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

Cytology ruined my life. My eyes are shot. I got sciatica. Hamstring is sore. Wife left me for someone with more earning potential. Lost my home and money. Forced to live in a pop-up trailer in Florida. All of these happened cause of cytology.

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Cytology in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

Funny thing is, those who bank on cytology will probably be losing their homes and money. Thank God I'm here to turn on the light. By the way, Kentucky, I love Kentucky. Drove through there years ago on my way to an interview at Columbus OH LabCorp, which I turned down twice, because the people there at that lab seemed too self-righteous. No wait, that was West Virginia I drove through.......but I have been to Kentucky and I did like it---when we lived in Nashville, we used to go there to get lottery tickets sometimes, and to hang out for an afternoon. And once we went there to some cave, which was stupid, because who wants to hang out in a dusty cave on a Saturday? Kentucky is a pretty place. But that cave sucked. God that was stupid.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

20 percent of homes in florida are vacant. More than cytotechs are hurting. Some really good buys in Florida right now. I think I would put my money in real estate over education if I had to choose between the two. These colleges are ripping people off bad.

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future in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

there are some useful majors, things that society is going to need. but there are also many useLESS majors......too many people dive into what sounds good in a pamphlet or advertisement. we got a fantastic deal last year at Vista Cay in Orlando-----right down the road from SeaWorld. Sure beat the Ramada that we were planning on staying at.

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cytotk in Louisville, Kentucky

102 months ago

Point out in Westborough, Massachusetts said: And I would point out, Kentucky, this is way more than just whether one is happy in cytology or not. This is about a field that is in demise, and the fact that cytotechs, happy or not, need to deal with the fact that their livelihood is dissolving away. "Staying put", because one is happy screening slides, is a recipe for disaster. You've got to look to the future, and it's not so hard to see it in the case of cytology.

Yes, I get it and I am sure everyone else who is reading this understands that our time is coming. I have said before that I expected my career to end a long time ago. My point is that just because someone is staying in this field and is enjoying the job, they shouldn't get blasted when they voice this. Statements like,"I can only imagine what DMF actually stands for. I know what it SHOULD stand for", is uncalled for. This person is not recruiting, they are saying be grateful for what you have.

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OK in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

People who say they are going to stay put because they enjoy cytology should get blasted awake, at the very least...........being grateful for what one has at the moment is another matter entirely.

Showed the cyto ad to some old gray bearded men sitting on a bench outside a general store.......they said yes, those jobs were here, but their memory wasn't clear....was it yesterday? No wait! 5 years ago!!!

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

I thought the statement about what DMF should stand for was funny.

The internet needs this forum to show people what is really going on out there. If you look up information about cytotechnology on the ASCP website or any other websites they still claim that there are more jobs than educated people to fill them. I laughed when Don Simpson claimed in Advance magazine a few years ago that techs were getting sign-on bonuses. The real situation is that the vacancy rate is a pathetic 2.6 percent and falling. The leaders of the field love writing papers and holding meetings to discuss the future and very little if any action comes out of it. Probably because most of the attendees live in the world of academia and dont have a clue what the real world is like. Like the corporate labs are gonna take the time to retrain techs for future testing. Not very likely at labcorp and quest. I've seen them take away molecular testing from cyto labs they have bought out in recent years. Most cytotech's livelihood is and will pretty much always be tied to the pap test. When/if it dies, the field dies.

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CytoTech2 in Texas

102 months ago

I agree that a career screening paps is a dead end and people who are now screening paps should start looking for other options. But to say that the whole field of Cytology is dying is a bit extreme.

I work in a cancer center with 12 cytotech's, and each day 2 people screen gyns for half a day. The other 10 are still very busy. That's with a volume of LESS THAN 40 PAPS A DAY. That is the norm for many years here. And yet, we continue to hire.

Cytotechs are absolutely critical to the function of cytopathology departments in hospitals and cancer centers, with or without paps.

We are the intermediaries between the cytoprep techs and the pathologists. We do all of the QI, manage the lab, deal with compliance issues, prepare slides for immuno stains and other ancillary tests, give immediate assessment on EBUS cases, help with research, and screen the non-gyns and FNA's.

Pathologists will never want to screen all of their own non-gyns and FNA's without a cytotech. It takes too much time. Their pay would go down because they couldn't sign out as many cases. Their liability would go up because there would be more errors without our skilled eyes and the time we can afford to spend on each case.

We have many pathologists with 20+ years of experience and still the only cases that skip a cytotech are the clearly positive FNA cases identified during immediate assessment. Imagine a pathologist screening a 20 slide FNA of a lymph node. Not going to happen. It's just not cost effective. And when they rush, they miss. Trust me, we find pathologist errors often.

Also on a positive note, we have brought HPV testing in-house and it's all being done by cytotechs.

Continued...

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CytoTech2 in Texas

102 months ago

Cytotech schools are going to close as they can no longer recruit because the word is out about paps and the horrors of working for a private lab. Many Cytotechs are reaching retirement age, and others are finding new careers. We're still needed in hospitals and cancer centers. So I believe we will become a rare, but still vibrant, growing and changing group of professionals.

My advice would be that if you can’t find a way to work with non-gyns and FNA’s and cross-train in molecular biology and management skills then it’s time to bail. The days of sitting in front of a microscope screening paps for 8 hours are about over. It’s a sad thing(or is it?), but it’s part of progress.

For everyone who has had a career in gyn cytology, it’s something to be proud of. The pap smear reduced cervical cancer deaths by 75%. Now lets hope we can keep the rates as low if we reduce screening as much as we believe will happen. Only the future will tell.

Best of luck to a highly skilled and imperiled bunch.

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Daniel Domogala in Phoenix, Arizona

102 months ago

Jamie in Springfield, Missouri said: Jenna, that is also the case at the lab that I work at in Missouri. Our volume keeps on a steady increase. Good news in my eyes :)

So, I recently was accepted to both a Master's program in the Biological Sciences and a cytotechnology program. I spoke with cytotechs in the pathology department at the University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona and they discouraged me from getting my Master's. However, it seems like from this board that a degree in cytotechnology would not be a good decision. As worthless as a Masters possibly is it could open more doors than a cytotechnology program and put me in less debt. From my experience as a veterinary technican, corporate clinics are horrible places, private practice and non for profits are the place to be. I guess this board is swaying me towards my Masters degree.

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CytoTech2 in Texas

102 months ago

Jamie-

I can't say much about the Master's. I actually looked at similar programs myself. The question to ask is "specifically what kind of job can you get?" And, "what is the demand?" A master's in Biological Sciences in general may not prepare you well enough for a job. Many ppl go on to PhD degrees from there.

I would discourage you from Cytotech school. The cytotechs in the University med center are probably very happy with their jobs (as I am with mine), but it is becoming quite competitive to get the good cytotech jobs. You will likely be unhappy in a private lab meaning Quest, LabCorp, etc).

Wow, I just discouraged you from both. lol. But it's a tough market right now.

I would suggest thinking very, very practically about this big decision.

Have you looked at Professional Science Master's Programs? www.sciencemasters.com/

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yeah in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

CytoTech2 in Texas said: Cytotech schools are going to close as they can no longer recruit because the word is out about paps and the horrors of working for a private lab. Many Cytotechs are reaching retirement age, and others are finding new careers. We're still needed in hospitals and cancer centers. So I believe we will become a rare, but still vibrant, growing and changing group of professionals.

My advice would be that if you can’t find a way to work with non-gyns and FNA’s and cross-train in molecular biology and management skills then it’s time to bail. The days of sitting in front of a microscope screening paps for 8 hours are about over. It’s a sad thing(or is it?), but it’s part of progress.

For everyone who has had a career in gyn cytology, it’s something to be proud of. The pap smear reduced cervical cancer deaths by 75%. Now lets hope we can keep the rates as low if we reduce screening as much as we believe will happen. Only the future will tell.

Best of luck to a highly skilled and imperiled bunch.

The whole field is dying may not be 100% accurate, I will give you that---but its close enough.

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question in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

CytoTech2 in Texas said: Jamie-

I can't say much about the Master's. I actually looked at similar programs myself. The question to ask is "specifically what kind of job can you get?" And, "what is the demand?" A master's in Biological Sciences in general may not prepare you well enough for a job. Many ppl go on to PhD degrees from there.

I would discourage you from Cytotech school. The cytotechs in the University med center are probably very happy with their jobs (as I am with mine), but it is becoming quite competitive to get the good cytotech jobs. You will likely be unhappy in a private lab meaning Quest, LabCorp, etc).

Wow, I just discouraged you from both. lol. But it's a tough market right now.

I would suggest thinking very, very practically about this big decision.

Have you looked at Professional Science Master's Programs? www.sciencemasters.com/

the question is not the job you can get but the job you want. if you dont define that, you will end up being zigzags all over the page.

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closing in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

CytoTech2 in Texas said: Cytotech schools are going to close as they can no longer recruit because the word is out about paps and the horrors of working for a private lab. Many Cytotechs are reaching retirement age, and others are finding new careers. We're still needed in hospitals and cancer centers. So I believe we will become a rare, but still vibrant, growing and changing group of professionals.

My advice would be that if you can’t find a way to work with non-gyns and FNA’s and cross-train in molecular biology and management skills then it’s time to bail. The days of sitting in front of a microscope screening paps for 8 hours are about over. It’s a sad thing(or is it?), but it’s part of progress.

For everyone who has had a career in gyn cytology, it’s something to be proud of. The pap smear reduced cervical cancer deaths by 75%. Now lets hope we can keep the rates as low if we reduce screening as much as we believe will happen. Only the future will tell.

Best of luck to a highly skilled and imperiled bunch.

the schools closed because of budget cuts, and the fact that the cytology job market is saturated, with very few jobs available or projected.

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closing in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

rare and vibrant? huh??

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

Cytotech2 makes a lot of good points but is like everyone else here in that he/she doesnt recommend the field. I am in a similar type of lab with FNA being big part of job and I feel the same way. The whole field of lab medicine is a mess and keeps getting worse.

There just isnt going to be enough jobs in hospitals and cancer centers to condone having 37 schools pumping out nearly 200 techs a year. It has been a shame watching labcorp and quest take over the market killing local community labs. Cytology could have had a future if it stayed local. Then you could do paps and market FNA/NGYN to physicians in the area.

The future of nongyns and fnas is cloudy too. If people quit smoking, that would eliminate about half my work. Core biopsies took away all the breast fna we used to do. Dont know what effect POD labs are gonna have on cytology. If a lot of procedures are done in large specialist offices, will they even hire a cytotech? Pathologists will probably have to fill the cytotech role in addition to their own working in a POD lab. There is a huge pathologist surplus so it would be easy to find one happy to work in a POD lab.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

rare and vibrant, growing

i do agree with rare

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go texas in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

keep posting, texas. prospective techs need the unvarnished truth. current techs need to wake up. a lot of 'em think they are safe and above it all as long as they park their @$$#$ and do their maximum slides.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

I can picture tumble weeds blowing past an old abandoned Labcorp or Quest in texas. Cant wait for that day.

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jennidalton83 in Cleveland, Ohio

102 months ago

Daniel Domogala in Phoenix, Arizona said: So, I recently was accepted to both a Master's program in the Biological Sciences and a cytotechnology program. I spoke with cytotechs in the pathology department at the University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona and they discouraged me from getting my Master's. However, it seems like from this board that a degree in cytotechnology would not be a good decision. As worthless as a Masters possibly is it could open more doors than a cytotechnology program and put me in less debt. From my experience as a veterinary technican, corporate clinics are horrible places, private practice and non for profits are the place to be. I guess this board is swaying me towards my Masters degree.

I have a Masters in Cytology and Biosciences. It does not get you paid any more than what any other tech gets paid. The biosciences part mainly trains you to do HPV testing, which is good if you can get hired at a lab that does HPV testing. I have been fortunate to have all hospital jobs, 2 of which do in house HPV testing. YOu have to be very patient and diligent to search for jobs where you want them though. My first job was a relocation because I couldn't find anything near home. Then I was able to progressively get closer to home by continually checking listings. Jobs move very fast, so you cannot afford to just check every so often if you desire a certain lcoation. When I say fast, I mean within a few days usually. I think that is why so many cytotechs find it so difficult to find positions; its a very saturated market and positions are filled extremely quickly.

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Masters in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

Cleveland, in order to perform HPV testing, what are the official qualifications one has to have? I know that the training is offered in various programs, but what is the requirement, if any? I think the recent ADVANCE had some ads for HPV testing qualification, but I wonder if it is even necessary. Seems like something you can train for in-house.
I share Sam's disgust with Quest and LabCorp. The way they hide/ignore their missed SIL's like dirtbag cowards, and pat themselves on their backs for their "productivity"......they deserve lawsuit upon lawsuit. A female cytotech or two appearing on Oprah would be nice, among other things.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

All you have to have is on the job training in most states for HPV testing. I think cytotechs are precluded in Tennessee and California though due to stupid licensure rules. Florida rules were vague and there was recent case that cleared up Florida's position. It was ruled cytotechs are qualified to perform molecular testing in florida. ASCP sent out a news aleart about it a while back.

www.ascp.org/HomePageContent/ePolicyNews/ePolicy-News--January-2011.aspx

It is disappointing seeing expensive online "molecular" classes popping up. They arent necessary for the most part. On the job training is a heck of a lot better than learning online in my opinion.

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RedSox in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

I think the Red Sox are only going to win when Beckett is on the mound. Rays are killing them right now in a battle to tie for the 2 worst teams...........

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Daniel Domogala in Phoenix, Arizona

102 months ago

I am talking about a Master's in Biomedical Science that is experiment based. Although, I don't know what I'll do with it, I don't pay tuition because I have a waiver and get a stipend. I also feel like this degree is an excellent way to learn problem solving skills using molecular biology. This CT school I applied to was very adamant about me joining, I was pleased to get in but now I am skeptical.

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jennidalton83 in Cleveland, Ohio

102 months ago

Masters in Westborough, Massachusetts said: Cleveland, in order to perform HPV testing, what are the official qualifications one has to have? I know that the training is offered in various programs, but what is the requirement, if any? I think the recent ADVANCE had some ads for HPV testing qualification, but I wonder if it is even necessary. Seems like something you can train for in-house.
I share Sam's disgust with Quest and LabCorp. The way they hide/ignore their missed SIL's like dirtbag cowards, and pat themselves on their backs for their "productivity"......they deserve lawsuit upon lawsuit. A female cytotech or two appearing on Oprah would be nice, among other things.

It doesn't require any special training. With a cytotech certification, you can learn it in house. The hospitals that do it that I have worked for taught CTs in house how to do the test. The hardship is not in whether or not a CT will be qualified to do the test, its finding places that LET CTs do the test. Many places don't let CTs do it because it can be done by much lower paid employees. After all, if you can handle a pipette, you can pretty much do HPV testing. But like I said, the places are out there, you just have to be diligent to find them.

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jennidalton83 in Cleveland, Ohio

102 months ago

Daniel Domogala in Phoenix, Arizona said: I am talking about a Master's in Biomedical Science that is experiment based. Although, I don't know what I'll do with it, I don't pay tuition because I have a waiver and get a stipend. I also feel like this degree is an excellent way to learn problem solving skills using molecular biology. This CT school I applied to was very adamant about me joining, I was pleased to get in but now I am skeptical.

Sorry, I just now saw that you meant two separate programs. The wording was just so similar to the Masters cytotech program I did.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

Schools aren't being honest with students. Most are still claiming there is more jobs than educated people to fill them. Just take a look at their program websites. Heck, the arkansas program director was claiming techs are getting sign on bonuses in Advance Magazine in recent years, which is laughable. I bet techs havent been getting sign-on bonuses for a decade, especially a new graduate.

It is not very competitive to get into cytology school anymore. If someone wants to go into the field, it is very easy despite so few schools. A lot of seats are going unfilled and some programs keep pushing back deadlines to get more people to apply. There has been quite a few schools that havent been filling to capacity, which is crazy when they accept so few to begin with. Word is getting out about the field and its future. Its not a bad major for med school but for a career, it is very risky.

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jennidalton83 in Cleveland, Ohio

102 months ago

Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida said: Schools aren't being honest with students. Most are still claiming there is more jobs than educated people to fill them. Just take a look at their program websites. Heck, the arkansas program director was claiming techs are getting sign on bonuses in Advance Magazine in recent years, which is laughable. I bet techs havent been getting sign-on bonuses for a decade, especially a new graduate.

It is not very competitive to get into cytology school anymore. If someone wants to go into the field, it is very easy despite so few schools. A lot of seats are going unfilled and some programs keep pushing back deadlines to get more people to apply. There has been quite a few schools that havent been filling to capacity, which is crazy when they accept so few to begin with. Word is getting out about the field and its future. Its not a bad major for med school but for a career, it is very risky.

As far as I know, the areas with sign on bonuses tend to be the midwest, rural areas that most people don't want to relocate to. When I graduated CT school in 2007, there were a few jobs posted in places like Idaho or Nebraska that offered sign on bonuses. Looking into the area showed they were in the middle of nowhere. I haven't seen bonuses offered in the past few years though. That's not to say you can't get incentives if you ask. I was able to get relocation paid for when I had to relocate for my first job.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

I saw a job posting in Silver City, New Mexico a few years ago at a hospital lab. Got out a map out of curiousity to see where that town was. Looked like it was in the middle of nowhere surrounded by ghost towns. I hope whoever took that job got a huge sign-on bonus.
That may be the only way to find a job eventually. Go to remote places out of the reach of labcorp, quest and bioreference labs.

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Texas in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

CytoTech2 in Texas said: Daniel- (sorry I put Jamie before, I looked at the post you quoted)

This is the point where you have to look at your life goals. If you go for a research-based Masters you're probably going to end up wanting or needing to go on for your PhD. Would you want to do that? If so, why not start a PhD program instead?

Or you might consider an MBA after your bio Masters....again, more education, more investment.

MBA's are a dime a dozen these days. And Cytology school does not teach problem solving skills. Texas, give some better advice.

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Texas Instruments in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

MBA's are a dime a dozen, so unless its Ivy League.............

"Cytology school teaches problem solving skills"......LOL !!!!!!!!

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

I hope they are teaching how to make money running a cytology lab in cytology school. I found out today that Anthem Blue Cross is only reimbursing 18 dollars for a regular liquid based pap and 36 dollars for a high risk hpv test. Heck, medicare pays more than that. Very sad :(

I would go without insurance before I would ever have Anthem Blue Cross.

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Rosely in Clark, New Jersey

102 months ago

Can Cytotechnologist do the rapid diagnosis during FNA onsite?

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

Yes, cytotechnologist can do the rapid diagnosis but cant charge for it unless pathologist is present. You can only bill if the pathologist is there looking at the passes giving the physician feedback. We make our pathologists go on all FNA. Gotta make some money.

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liyah in Covington, Georgia

102 months ago

For u guys and girls would yall ever do cytology study?
if not please put why and if u would put why baecuse i want to study this butt what yall writting it seems like a really bad subject

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yall already did in Westborough, Massachusetts

102 months ago

we already did! Go back and read all the posts! Cytology is filled with people who really cannot transfer their skills to anything else, and therefore do not/cannot leave. All the while, screening is being replaced by automation and molecular testing. These 2 points are indisputable, and ought to be enough to make any prospective student look elsewhere for gainful employment.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

weall already did. Maybe we can transfer our skills to air traffic controllers. They cant seem to stay awake. If being chained to a desk screening 150 cases a day doesnt put you to sleep, nothing will.

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Richard in Clark, New Jersey

102 months ago

If there is no pathologist onsite of FNA, can cytotechnologist do the rapid diagnosis? For example, if a result is a positive, a tissue biopsy will be ordered by a cytotechnologist. Is it ok?

Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida said: Yes, cytotechnologist can do the rapid diagnosis but cant charge for it unless pathologist is present. You can only bill if the pathologist is there looking at the passes giving the physician feedback. We make our pathologists go on all FNA. Gotta make some money.

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Sam Kaiserblade in Venice, Florida

102 months ago

You can do the rapid diagnosis but you can't bill for it. So you cant use the CPT codes 88172 and 88177. Only when a pathologist gives the assessment of each pass can you bill those. For the FNA, the tech can only bill 88173 (and 88305 if there is a cell block) when the pathologist doesnt go on the FNA.

Not sure if I understand what you mean by ordering a tissue biopsy. Does a positive result drive the physician to collect tissue in addition to the FNA?

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Daniel Domogala in Phoenix, Arizona

102 months ago

Do you think Cytotechs at the hospital have a good idea of the field? I also was skeptical because the deadline for my cytotech application was extended, the administrator contacted me telling me to complete it. I originally started filling out an application for a molecular genetics program. I thought that being a cytotech would be more rewarding and the standards are higher. I think I got that idea from talking to an administrator in Tucson, even though there are no cytotech programs offered in state. It's really hard to figure out who has the best idea of the field. What if all of the people on this board are overly pessimistic? Though the trends for the profession don't indicate that.

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