What do you enjoy most about your cytotechnologist career?

Page:   1  2  3  4  Next »   Last »

Host

What do you enjoy most about being a cytotechnologist? What do you dislike the most? Is it challenging? Are there many opportunities to learn and advance?

What keeps you at your job?

Reply

Tally

139 months ago

I think that cytology is very rewarding because when I can detect a pre-cancerous change in a young girl and she can have a out patient procedure to eliminate HPV then maybe I have saved one person from ever developing cancer. It takes a special person to practice cytology because it does require extreme attention to detail and you must love what you do to sit at a microscope each day. However, cytology allows you to challenge your self to stay current on new technologies and procedures. We are vital to patient care management and detection. Most employers offer continuing education either through presentations, teleconferences and ASCP current issues. You should love what you do and saving lifes is my passion!

Reply

SRH in Bothell, Washington

139 months ago

I love the accomplishment of reading slides. I came from a research career, which as you may know can be slow-going. In cytotechnology, you can read a slide and be done with it in 5-20 minutes (5 minutes for a normal slide, 20 for a difficult diagnosis.) The most rewarding part for me was making a difficult diagnosis and having the pathologist agree, and/or having the biopsy diagnosed the same way. The worst - becoming a supervisor and having to do paperwork instead. I am out of the field raising my family, but when I return I will not supervise. Reading slides is so much more rewarding.

Reply

Jenny in Lawrenceville, Georgia

139 months ago

Hate this field! If you are smart, you will try working in another field. Private labs are so much better than LabCorp and or Quest. They require you to read 80-90 a day no questions asked. The supervisors are very harsh and brash. Please consider doing nursing--it pays more as well as it is in demand.

Reply

Thomas in Flushing, New York

139 months ago

Tally said: I think that cytology is very rewarding because when I can detect a pre-cancerous change in a young girl and she can have a out patient procedure to eliminate HPV then maybe I have saved one person from ever developing cancer. It takes a special person to practice cytology because it does require extreme attention to detail and you must love what you do to sit at a microscope each day. However, cytology allows you to challenge your self to stay current on new technologies and procedures. We are vital to patient care management and detection. Most employers offer continuing education either through presentations, teleconferences and ASCP current issues. You should love what you do and saving lifes is my passion!

You sound like a newbie just entering this field. I was like you all positive and excited back in 1993 just out of Cytology school. How do I sound today after 15 yesrs in this lousy field? I am looking to get out. Demand for this profession is very limited. Hospital jobs are rare and the ones that usually do the hiring which are the private labs(Quest and Labcorp) are no different than swaetshops. They sapped the blood out of you, 90 plus slides a day and make sure there are no mistakes, and then discard you as your salary increases through the years. I am one of the lucky ones that landed a job at a hospital after working at Quest. If you are looking to be rich and have a stable job, Cytology is definitely not the field. I am looking to get out and exploring Physician Assistant, Pathology Assistant, and Physical Therapist as options. I hope my comments will not scare you. The good old days of being a Cytotech are gone. You missed the boat when this field was hot and salaries were high in the late eighties and early nineties due to CLIA 1988.

Reply

Anonymous1925 in California

139 months ago

Thomas,

You got that right! This field is not the best choice for anyone with good sense. It pays low pay and labs like Quest Diagnostics will work the H E L L out of you and it makes no sense! Younger people find another career!

Reply

New Grad in Grand Forks, North Dakota

138 months ago

I am graduating this year and I don't like the profession at all. It isn't for me, and I am glad to be moving on to something else (med school). Glad to hear that is the advice.

Reply

James in Ballston Spa, New York

137 months ago

New Grad in Grand Forks, North Dakota said: I am graduating this year and I don't like the profession at all. It isn't for me, and I am glad to be moving on to something else (med school). Glad to hear that is the advice.

Hey im also trying to use a cytotechnology 1 year program to get into medical school, howd it work out for you, try to get back to me if u can

Reply

Jant in Illinois

134 months ago

Host said: What do you enjoy most about being a cytotechnologist? What do you dislike the most? Is it challenging? Are there many opportunities to learn and advance?

What keeps you at your job?

I enjoy screening slides as a cytotechnologist, but dislike some coworkers who do not want to work and learn. Also, those people have bad skills in screen. They always like to give new cytotechnologists a difficult time.

Those people should leave this field.

Reply

pattymac42 in Gainesville, Florida

128 months ago

OK so obviously the answers you have gotten are from people who work in so-called "pap-mills"; big labs that specialize in nothing but gynecological work, which is tedious and draining and understandably will burn you out as a cytotechnologist. I am lucky enough to work in a teaching hospital setting and the situation is much different. I LOVE my job. Over half of my daily work is non-gynecological specimens. I see something new nearly everyday. There is always something new to learn. There is room for advancement too - whether it be broadening my skill set to include molecular pathology techniques or to move up to supervisory status. I enjoy cytology because, for me, it is relaxing. I like knowing that the only thing I'm expected to think about while screening slides is screening slides; I feel like its a chance to set everything else aside; like a break from the hastles of everyday life. The one thing I don't like about cytology is that I'm inside all day, but that's how it is with most jobs. Anyway, don't listen to these sour lemons - cytology is great, just make sure you get a job that fits your intrests.

Reply

Sam Kaiserblade in Columbus, Indiana

128 months ago

Cytology can be great if you are fortunate enough to work in a hospital lab with a variety of work to do. A nice combination of screening and non-gyn processing/FNA procedures makes it a stimulating job. The problem is that a high percentage of the jobs out there are in "pap mills". It seems to be getting worse and worse with all the lab mergers, buyouts etc. Hopefully in the near future some anti-trust lawsuits against labcorp and quest will help fix things and get the field back where it should be.

Reply

Andy001 in New York, New York

128 months ago

Sam Kaiserblade in Columbus, Indiana said: Cytology can be great if you are fortunate enough to work in a hospital lab with a variety of work to do. A nice combination of screening and non-gyn processing/FNA procedures makes it a stimulating job. The problem is that a high percentage of the jobs out there are in "pap mills". It seems to be getting worse and worse with all the lab mergers, buyouts etc. Hopefully in the near future some anti-trust lawsuits against labcorp and quest will help fix things and get the field back where it should be.

Sam, I have read quite a few comments from you on this forum. Sam, why don't you do the Cytology field a favor by initiating or organizing a group so our voice could be heard. All the commentsa from you is how this field is going down due to the private labs taking over the cytology business. Sam, instad of sittting on your ass bitching about things, do something about it. Talk is cheap, action speaks volume. I do agree with you that the field of Cytology is being taken over by Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp but it is a business. Another thing, yes working as a Cytotech is much better at a hospital but there are few positions available. Which sane Cytotech will give up there position at a hospital to work at a private lab. Newly graduates are forced into working at these "pap-mills namely Quest or LabCorp" because they have no other options. Another comment from you that bugs me "Hopefully in the near future some anti-trust lawsuits against labcorp and quest will help fix things and get the field back where it should be."
Sam, instead of hoping, do something about it. Sam again, like the NIKE commercial, "Just Do It" Enough said......

Reply

Andy001 in New York, New York

128 months ago

pattymac42 in Gainesville, Florida said: OK so obviously the answers you have gotten are from people who work in so-called "pap-mills"; big labs that specialize in nothing but gynecological work, which is tedious and draining and understandably will burn you out as a cytotechnologist. I am lucky enough to work in a teaching hospital setting and the situation is much different. I LOVE my job. Over half of my daily work is non-gynecological specimens. I see something new nearly everyday. There is always something new to learn. There is room for advancement too - whether it be broadening my skill set to include molecular pathology techniques or to move up to supervisory status. I enjoy cytology because, for me, it is relaxing. I like knowing that the only thing I'm expected to think about while screening slides is screening slides; I feel like its a chance to set everything else aside; like a break from the hastles of everyday life. The one thing I don't like about cytology is that I'm inside all day, but that's how it is with most jobs. Anyway, don't listen to these sour lemons - cytology is great, just make sure you get a job that fits your intrests.

You sound like an ancient Cytotech who possibly may have been around when George Papanicoloau invented the Pap Smear. First of all, yes, working as a Cytotech in a hospital is better than a private lab. I am happy to hear you are enjoying life at the hospital. Unfortunately, there are not enough postions available for cytotechs in hospitals. If you look around, the only ones who are mainly hiring Cytotechs these days are Quest or LabCorp. Your comment of "Anyway, don't listen to these sour lemons - cytology is great, just make sure you get a job that fits your interests."
Listen, not all of us are as fortunate as you working at a hospital. Why don't you leave your position and work at one of the private labs, I am sure your tune will change.

Reply

Ron in Flushing, New York

128 months ago

Sam Kaiserblade in Columbus, Indiana said: Cytology can be great if you are fortunate enough to work in a hospital lab with a variety of work to do. A nice combination of screening and non-gyn processing/FNA procedures makes it a stimulating job. The problem is that a high percentage of the jobs out there are in "pap mills". It seems to be getting worse and worse with all the lab mergers, buyouts etc. Hopefully in the near future some anti-trust lawsuits against labcorp and quest will help fix things and get the field back where it should be.

Sam, Andy from New York has a point in his comments to you. Anyway, I also have seen numerous postings in the Cytology forum from you and you do appear to know what is going on Cytology these days. But, may you please tell me why also you are just talking and whining about how things in this field are going sour?? You keep moaning and bitching about how the big private labs are taking over and you're just sitting there in front of the computer, at your nice comfy hospital postion, typing away. Comeon enough is enough from you and quit raising the white flag by just accepting or like you stated "Hoping" things will magically change in regards to the private labs destroying Cytology.

Reply

Kara in Freeport, Illinois

128 months ago

Hello, I'm working on getting my cytotechnology degree. I have a passion for lab work and it seems like the job for me. It sounds like a lot of people hate their job. Is it this job really that bad, and going down the toilet like most of you are making it sound? I do not necessarily want to get into a career that is dying. All my advisors say it is a great field and has many career options. Could you please help me out. Thanks

Reply

Sam Kaiserblade in Columbus, Indiana

128 months ago

Its funny how all the cytotechs from NEW YORK are such jerks in this forum. You accuse me of bitching and whining. That is all you New Yorkers do here besides attacking people. How do you know what I am doing to try to do? Just because I use words like "hopefully" doesnt mean I am sitting on the sidelines.

Reply

Brian in New York, New York

128 months ago

Sam Kaiserblade in Columbus, Indiana said: Its funny how all the cytotechs from NEW YORK are such jerks in this forum. You accuse me of bitching and whining. That is all you New Yorkers do here besides attacking people. How do you know what I am doing to try to do? Just because I use words like "hopefully" doesnt mean I am sitting on the sidelines.

Sam, I don't see how us New Yorkers are jerks and attacking people on this forum. Your feelings are just hurt because it appears that "YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TRUTH" Sounds familiar from a film, huh? Just quit acting like a Cytology politician on this forum by just talking and talking about how things are in this field right now. By the way, i really don't see how the other comments from fellow New Yorkers as being rude or in attack mode as you claimed. What is wrong for telling you to stand up on what you believe is happening in Cytology? I have read some of your past postings on this forum and you do seem to know what is happening in the field right now. I do agree with some of your comments but just wish you would do something about it. Take care.

Reply

Roddell in Chino Hills, California

126 months ago

Cytotech for 3 years at a "pap mill". Get out of this field is my advice. I am now in nursing school and loving it. Direct patient care and more rewarding vs. behind a microscope in a cubical with very little human interaction. The money is good here in California for cytotechs, but once you hit that ceiling, thats it. The bad thing is, the most money is made at "pap mills". I seriously learned that it is not all about the money. You have to enjoy what you do as well as have positive relationships with your co-workers. In cytology, there is no such thing as team work in my opinion. If you ask for help, people don't want to help because they don't want any responsibility of your diagnosis. All the senior tech at my job think it was a great idea of me going back to school. What does that say about this profession? Please feel free to comment.

Reply

Newman in Grand Forks, North Dakota

126 months ago

I am glad to read this page. It has been very helpful. All your coments made me thik that the field is not for me either. Life is too short to be a cytotech. Right after i gradute i will move on too. New grad from ND....How is med school...Hopefully i will follow your foot steps.

Reply

sp4miz in Chesapeake, Virginia

126 months ago

Thomas in Flushing, New York said: You sound like a newbie just entering this field. I was like you all positive and excited back in 1993 just out of Cytology school. How do I sound today after 15 yesrs in this lousy field? I am looking to get out. Demand for this profession is very limited. Hospital jobs are rare and the ones that usually do the hiring which are the private labs(Quest and Labcorp) are no different than swaetshops. They sapped the blood out of you, 90 plus slides a day and make sure there are no mistakes, and then discard you as your salary increases through the years. I am one of the lucky ones that landed a job at a hospital after working at Quest. If you are looking to be rich and have a stable job, Cytology is definitely not the field. I am looking to get out and exploring Physician Assistant, Pathology Assistant, and Physical Therapist as options. I hope my comments will not scare you. The good old days of being a Cytotech are gone. You missed the boat when this field was hot and salaries were high in the late eighties and early nineties due to CLIA 1988.

Hey Thomas I believe we worked together at Quest back on Long Island in the mid 90's. If so then a heart HI! As for the above mentioned---Amen Bro!

Reply

Linda in Grand Forks, North Dakota

124 months ago

New Grad in Grand Forks, North Dakota said: I am graduating this year and I don't like the profession at all. It isn't for me, and I am glad to be moving on to something else (med school). Glad to hear that is the advice.

Hey New grad.....Or should I say Magi...I know who you are from grand forks. Now I am in med school to, but in THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. You couldn't make it to med school here so you had to go all the way to IRLAND. So please stop looking down on our former colleagues.

Reply

KimD in Minneapolis, Minnesota

124 months ago

New Grad in Grand Forks, North Dakota said: I am graduating this year and I don't like the profession at all. It isn't for me, and I am glad to be moving on to something else (med school). Glad to hear that is the advice.

Ur story sucks, U have the lowest rating....lol

Reply

Diana in Hazlet, New Jersey

123 months ago

I am thinking of going back to school for Cytotechnology in NJ. before I do this, could someone tell me what the job outlook is like in my area and what the starting pay is? I seem to get different information on sites online I go to.

Reply

Timothy in College Point, New York

123 months ago

Diana in Hazlet, New Jersey said: I am thinking of going back to school for Cytotechnology in NJ. before I do this, could someone tell me what the job outlook is like in my area and what the starting pay is? I seem to get different information on sites online I go to.

To Diana in Hazlet, New Jersey, you are about 20 years late entering the field. This field was hot and in demand with salaries high due to CLIA 1988. Just read the numerous postings and you'll see how this field is slowly dying with automation now available to do the screenings, the availabilty of a vaccine, Gardasil, and the HPV High Risk testing. Some doctors are simply relying on just the HPV Testing results and skipping the error prone paps screened by Cytotechs these days. The salaries are good if you are already established in the field but with entry level cytotechs, your salary will be low and will remain that way for awhile since demand for your services is no longer the case. After graduating from Cytology school, your only realistic options for employment are the private labs like Quest, LabCorp, Sunrise Labs. These labs employed Cytotechs and discard them like yesterday newspaper. I have worked at these places and it really is that bad as many can attest to. As for hospital positions, they're really tough to land because cytotechs don't leave them for private labs. So Diana, my advice to you, don't waste your money going into this field. Think of Physician Assistant, Physical Therapy as alternatives. You will thank me later if you enter these fields with the booming of the aging population.

Reply

Diana in Hazlet, New Jersey

123 months ago

Thank you Timothy so much for your extensive reply, I do appreciate it! Gives me much to think about. Once again thanks.
Diana

Reply

Ashley in Fayetteville, North Carolina

123 months ago

Diana in Hazlet, New Jersey said: Thank you Timothy so much for your extensive reply, I do appreciate it! Gives me much to think about. Once again thanks.
Diana

I also had thought about doing cytotechnology but after reading these forums I think I may have to take another direction..... Maybe nursing.... I had also thought about dental assistant....

Reply

CELLFREAK in Fort Collins, Colorado

122 months ago

Andy001 in New York, New York said: You sound like an ancient Cytotech who possibly may have been around when George Papanicoloau invented the Pap Smear. First of all, yes, working as a Cytotech in a hospital is better than a private lab. I am happy to hear you are enjoying life at the hospital. Unfortunately, there are not enough postions available for cytotechs in hospitals. If you look around, the only ones who are mainly hiring Cytotechs these days are Quest or LabCorp. Your comment of "Anyway, don't listen to these sour lemons - cytology is great, just make sure you get a job that fits your interests."
Listen, not all of us are as fortunate as you working at a hospital. Why don't you leave your position and work at one of the private labs, I am sure your tune will change.

Well,I am not a dinosaur and I completely agree with the tech working in a hospital setting. I enjoy cytology, have been doing it for 12 yrs. I worked in a private reference lab (no quotas, I might add)for 5 years and now i have been working in a hospital setting for 7 years and I LOVE it! My job consists of 30% paps and the rest FNA's in ultrasound and CT. It never occurred to me to work in a lab like Quest or LabCorp. I did my homework and found the perfect set up for me twice. Anyone entering into this field should do the same. I empathize with you and suggest that you be willing to move if you go into this field. It's fantastic and would not consider doing anything else!

Reply

cytotech in Westborough, Massachusetts

122 months ago

it is obviously important work that i do, for 15 years now. but, man, essentially sitting by yourself at a microscope gets old. thats the bottom line. i want to be growing, learning, etc. cytotechs are a terminal bunch, really no upward mobility. very little human interaction, and you are basically working an assembly line. screen slides and thats all you do ! its important work, but i think you should do it for no more than a few years. get a plan because this stuff gets old-------and its a terminal degree, as my actual instructor said 15 years ago. you can be the best worker, and aside from your yearly raises, you will still be doing the same thing 5-10-15-20 years out unless YOU get a plan. believe it. i speak the 100% truth.

Reply

Tyler in Cambridge, Massachusetts

122 months ago

cytotech in Westborough, Massachusetts said: it is obviously important work that i do, for 15 years now. but, man, essentially sitting by yourself at a microscope gets old. thats the bottom line. i want to be growing, learning, etc. cytotechs are a terminal bunch, really no upward mobility. very little human interaction, and you are basically working an assembly line. screen slides and thats all you do ! its important work, but i think you should do it for no more than a few years. get a plan because this stuff gets old-------and its a terminal degree, as my actual instructor said 15 years ago. you can be the best worker, and aside from your yearly raises, you will still be doing the same thing 5-10-15-20 years out unless YOU get a plan. believe it. i speak the 100% truth.

I totally agree with your opinion. I have worked in this field for few years. I have the same feeling as you. I think to change to another field, but I have no idea what field I should go.

Reply

cytotech in Westborough, Massachusetts

122 months ago

well, general practioner's are in short supply. to name one example. but the sensible thing is to choose what YOU want. What is that ONE thing above all others? So, go after it! Unless you really dig cytology---or whatever you are currently doing-----you owe it to yourself to pursue something else. I simply CANNOT spend the rest of my working life doing what I really don't like very much. I have to at least be on that path moving away from it. And I am.

Reply

Rosely in Medford, Massachusetts

122 months ago

Hi,

I heard that cytotechnologists should screen certain quote of the slides per day. Could you tell me how many for each cytotechnologist in a hospital usually?

Reply

CELLFREAK in Fort Collins, Colorado

122 months ago

Where I work, paps are not a huge part of our business, we usually screen 20-30 per day along with non-gyns, and doing FNA procedures. Hope that helps. Hospital cytology is where it's at!

Reply

cytotech in Westborough, Massachusetts

122 months ago

Oh, well that makes all the difference in the world. Non-gyn cytology!!! So much different from paps....Non gyns are cells from...brace yourself....OTHER parts of the body !!!! I worked in a hospital already. My point, my only point, is that sitting on your butt looking through a microscope gets old, regardless of the cells you are screening. If you dispute that, and a few do, happy screening to you. I find it utterly mind-numbing. That will conclude my comments on the matter.

Reply

Kadi in Clarksville, Tennessee

122 months ago

Good luck to you cytotech in finding a career that suits you. Brace yourself, everything gets old after awhile.

Reply

Sherman in College Point, New York

122 months ago

cytotech in Westborough, Massachusetts said: Oh, well that makes all the difference in the world. Non-gyn cytology!!! So much different from paps....Non gyns are cells from...brace yourself....OTHER parts of the body !!!! I worked in a hospital already. My point, my only point, is that sitting on your butt looking through a microscope gets old, regardless of the cells you are screening. If you dispute that, and a few do, happy screening to you. I find it utterly mind-numbing. That will conclude my comments on the matter.

If you hate this field, do everyone in this forum a favor and get the f**K out! I totally agree with Kadi in Tennessee that everything gets old and boring after you've done it for awhile. But hey, with most people's predicament of having a mortgage, a family, car payments, etc... it is not so easy to switch careers and start at the bottom again. So, to the cytotech in Westborough, Mass., if you can manage to switch careers and possibly taking out more student loans and graduating to a new career with a paycut then the more power to you. Later......

Reply

Rosely in Medford, Massachusetts

122 months ago

CELLFREAK in Fort Collins, Colorado said: Where I work, paps are not a huge part of our business, we usually screen 20-30 per day along with non-gyns, and doing FNA procedures. Hope that helps. Hospital cytology is where it's at!

Thanks. It really helps.

Reply

soon to be cytotech in Norfolk, Virginia

121 months ago

Since there are so many cytotechs on here in the NY area, I have a question for you all. I have noticed (atleast from my online research) that the salaries in that area are significantly higher than those moreso down south (past VA). Would you agree with this as a realistic assumption and also would you say that this probably compensates for a higher stress level because of the higher volume of business?

Reply

CELLFREAK in Fort Collins, Colorado

121 months ago

I definitely think that the stress level in a large lab could be quite high, it just depends on if a person has to screen a certain number a day. The salary could be higher also because of the cost of living. I have noticed the CT jobs in Florida are probably the lowest paying in the nation. I'm not sure why that is because you certainly can't "eat" scenery AND you have to pay to have a Florida license also.

Reply

cytotech in Waltham, Massachusetts

121 months ago

just received a couple of replies via email and wanted to respond. first, i did not say that i hate this field. (i happen to be a cytotech in good standing) i said that the work is very important, yet it gets extremely old. all work gets old, no kidding. but this field, particularly so ! at least for me, and that is why i am working to get out. i have stated my personal opinions and have not insulted anybody at all. so, please, dont tell me to get the blank out.

Reply

CELLFREAK in Fort Collins, Colorado

121 months ago

Does anyone out there have any recent experience in taking the SCT exam. I'm scheduled to take it and haven't a clue on how heavy, in particular, they will emphasize lab management. Can anyone help me with this question?

Reply

carrieISdreaming in Park Hills, Missouri

121 months ago

hello, ive been thinking about a career in cytology and have been reading a lot of these forums where everyone is complaining. A lot of what everyone is complaining about is having to work fast paced, not much interaction with other people, and getting bored with doing the same thing all the time. Well, I dont like a lot of interaction with people, I like knowing I'm going to be doing the same thing all the time and I like fast paced work. Is this career for me? What else should I be warned about?

Reply

Kadi in Clarksville, Tennessee

121 months ago

Cytology might very well be for you. The one major thing for me has been just finding a job, especially close to home. If you're willing to relocate, I would give it a shot. I don't regret going to cytology school even after being unemployed for months at a time while the interest on my loan is going up. I want to be a cytologist, I enjoy it. I will compromise for it. I went to school originally for dental hygiene and worked for a couple years, but like you, I am not much of a people person and I enjoy having my day planned out for me so I know what to do and when to do it.

Reply

doodster AMMA in Minneapolis, Minnesota

121 months ago

Djude Cyto whattttttttttt? Just form the name this stuff seems to suck. Study some thing dudes like me know and benifit form. Them man pays well only for those types of jobs not for cyto whattttttttttttttt? Dude that is why am bouncing outta it after wasting my time studying cyto whattttttttttt?

Reply

cellfreak in Fort Collins, Colorado

121 months ago

This comment (in a professional forum) is a joke, right? Cytology is a serious profession and comments like this make the author look silly and uneducated. Or am I the only one that doesn't get it?

Reply

cytotech in Waltham, Massachusetts

121 months ago

actually its Westborough, MA...........
interesting that some are dying to get out and some happy as a clam to be in cytology. years ago, when touring a lab in the south, prior to cyto school enrollment, i remember saying to myself how GREAT it must be to work in a quiet room, no phone ringing off the hook, nobody pulling you this way and that way. but now that I have had that for many years, i feel i've had my fill of it, and time to move on.

Reply

cellfreak in Fort Collins, Colorado

121 months ago

i've felt that way many times even working at a job i really like. in our father's day you stayed at the job and retired. now many people have 2 and 3 careers in their lifetime. i hope you find what makes you happy!

Reply

doodster AMMA in Minneapolis, Minnesota

121 months ago

My friend cellfreak, I am struggling to make it with my pay check as a cytotech and I am not even sure about the job security any more. We do not have any kind of political protection such as unions. Where I work people who did not go to college and some who did not even complete high school are earning about $ 22/hour working as janitors. The reason is because they have union that pressures the greedy top management team. I have been working as a cytotech for 3 years and I earn 24.35 and struggle to raise a family. Honestly if a friend or anybody for that matter asks me for an advice to study cytology I would not recommend it.

Reply

deltaboy2 in Jackson, Mississippi

121 months ago

Doodster, I have been working cytology for @25 years and do not make much over 24.35. If I had to do it all over again, I would probably have chosen a profession that is portable. You know the hindsight deal, yeah we have a cytology school that puts out @8/year, a lot of those are working other jobs. I forsee that this profession will go away, as far as GYN in that next 20years.

Reply

cytotech in Waltham, Massachusetts

121 months ago

to sum it all up, in my opinion:
i see the writing on the wall. i see the pap smear being done by other than the cytotech, i.e., imagers and thru molecular tests. i see that happening today, and that is only going to increase over time. (you have to wonder about the long range plans of TriPath and Cytyc. we all may be in for a shock before too long). i see cytotech schools closing. i see cytotechs not making a whole heck of a lot of money in terms of what they accomplish. i see the best cytotechs with zilch for upward mobility. its a terminal degree after all. and the supervisor stays till retirement------he or she has nowhere else to go. thats just the nature of it. i do a good amount of slides with high accuracy, but at too high a cost of anxiety and worry. truly, it has not been worth it. an important job, for sure. something to be proud of. but i guess the bottom line for me is that i need something that gives me back a bit of fun and excitement. that ain't happening looking thru a microscope. not for me anyway. all day long, chained to the scope, I feel like Captain Pike in that old StarTrek episode---you know the one, where he sits there in a vegetative state, presses the green light for food, presses the red light for bathroom, etc. Now somebody is sure to write back encouraging me to take frequent stretching breaks. Please..............

Reply

sp4miz in Chesapeake, Virginia

121 months ago

After reading the above, I cannot disagree more. Cytology is a dying field and perhaps it will be a good hobby to manually screen. After all automation is really what it's all about in terms of profitability and the pap mill mentality of it all. I can only say that being laid off due to downsizing has been the great impetus to go into a new career (probably education college level) and truly a blessing. After nearly 15 years of the BS it is so refreshing to be out of the lab!

Reply

Page:   1  2  3  4  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.