HVAC Career PRO's vs. CON's anyone?

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

96 months ago

I am old at 38, and DO have a six pack , from installing hvac at my age, I would say something ignorant in response, this is more important than your comment.

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don in Millersburg, Ohio

95 months ago

been in own bus 25yrs 66 still working some you have to have good people i pay top money we get top money for our work ALWAYS be honest

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green in Baldwin, New York

95 months ago

im 32 years old and i want to get in hvac..im about to start at lincoln tech for a 11 month program. im after the big bucks because i intend on doing whatever it takes. any tips on how i can going about this the rite way...please no negativity, because i have my mind made up...i just want to no from experienced techs, that if the had a chance to do it again, what and how would you go about doing it, gong for the cash, not wasting any time?.....

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

95 months ago

green in Baldwin, New York said: im 32 years old and i want to get in hvac..im about to start at lincoln tech for a 11 month program. im after the big bucks because i intend on doing whatever it takes. any tips on how i can going about this the rite way...please no negativity, because i have my mind made up...i just want to no from experienced techs, that if the had a chance to do it again, what and how would you go about doing it, gong for the cash, not wasting any time?.....

Lincoln Tech in the Long Island NY area?? Must be costing around $30,000 right??

I hate to tell you this but you won't be making 'big bucks' for some time especially given the economy & competition. You will be lucky to find a job (any job)....

I looked at Porter & Chester in both CT & in the Boston MA area. Their promises & pie in the sky optimism is sleezy at best for a program that they charge $27,000 for and believe that somehow you can get a job in the field when literally every single job for HVAC (and most other trades) require at least 3 years experience

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

95 months ago

Lincoln Tech in the Long Island NY area?? Must be costing around $30,000 right??

I hate to tell you this but you won't be making 'big bucks' for some time especially given the economy & competition. You will be lucky to find a job (any job)....

I looked at Porter & Chester in both CT & in the Boston MA area. Their promises & pie in the sky optimism is sleezy at best for a program that they charge $27,000 for and believe that somehow you can get a job in the field when literally every single job for HVAC (and most other trades) require at least 3 years experience

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Erik in Lebanon, Oregon

95 months ago

green in Baldwin, New York said: im 32 years old and i want to get in hvac..im about to start at lincoln tech for a 11 month program. im after the big bucks because i intend on doing whatever it takes. any tips on how i can going about this the rite way...please no negativity, because i have my mind made up...i just want to no from experienced techs, that if the had a chance to do it again, what and how would you go about doing it, gong for the cash, not wasting any time?.....

I think the only way you're gonna make big bucks in this business is to work for yourself or go commercial/engineer or something.

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

95 months ago

Erik in Lebanon, Oregon said: I think the only way you're gonna make big bucks in this business is to work for yourself or go commercial/engineer or something.

That guy drank the cool aid that those 'schools' are dishing out. After speaking with the admissions "representative" at Porter & Chester, it made me want to head for the exit as fast as possible.

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A/C Girl

95 months ago

green in Baldwin, New York said: im 32 years old and i want to get in hvac..im about to start at lincoln tech for a 11 month program. im after the big bucks because i intend on doing whatever it takes. any tips on how i can going about this the rite way...please no negativity, because i have my mind made up...i just want to no from experienced techs, that if the had a chance to do it again, what and how would you go about doing it, gong for the cash, not wasting any time?.....

If you still can get your money back. My husband & I own a HVAC biz in FL and I will tell you right now that the tech schools have potential students believing that they will be "van ready" after graduation and that is just a lie. My father-in-law (FIL) is a retired HVAC teacher who taught at a community college for a fraction of what you are paying. The best training you can get is in the field being trained up as an apprentice, if you go to tech school you will start as an apprentice, it takes about 5 years to be 100% ready to go out on your own. After about a yr you can do tune-ups, which is low paying.
There is so much to know in this industry that you can never learn it all in 11 mo. My FIL once told my husband who is a licensed contractor that airflow wasn't part of HVAC/R it was an entirely different industry, the "V" in HVAC stands for ventilation another word for airflow. What I would do in your place is go to area A/C biz's first thing when they open and offer to work min wage even part time if that is all they have, find the local supply houses & cosy up to the counter guys as they usually know who is hiring, but please don't waste your money because even w/ 11 mo trade school you will still have to apprective for 4 yrs making anywhere btwn min wage & $13 / hour.

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A/C Girl

95 months ago

There are a lot of pro's and con's to the industry.
Pro
You really make someone's day when they are either sweating or freezing to death when their system is down.
Con
The customer wants to kill you when they need a special order part in extreme weather.
Pro
The money can be extremely good if you work hard, don't mind overtime and working weekends
Con
During the season you won't have much time for family or friends
Pro
Lots of overtime is possible
Con
Lots of slow weeks are inevitable

Bottom line I love the HVAC industry and wouldn't change industries for anything. I got a great piece of advice a few years ago from a customer, he was a retired heating contractor from up north and he recommended taking all the overtime money every month and putting it in a 6 month Certificate of Deposit which gets a little better interest than a savings account and that way during the slow months you have a CD every month that you can cash out without penalties. I thought that was brilliant.

Remember w/ everything its who you know, how far out there you are willing to put yourself, how much time you are willing to commit to staying on top of industry changes and making sure you are always the best that you can be and better than most of the compition!!

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green in Baltimore, Maryland

95 months ago

A/C Girl said: If you still can get your money back. My husband & I own a HVAC biz in FL and I will tell you right now that the tech schools have potential students believing that they will be "van ready" after graduation and that is just a lie. My father-in-law (FIL) is a retired HVAC teacher who taught at a community college for a fraction of what you are paying. The best training you can get is in the field being trained up as an apprentice, if you go to tech school you will start as an apprentice, it takes about 5 years to be 100% ready to go out on your own. After about a yr you can do tune-ups, which is low paying.
There is so much to know in this industry that you can never learn it all in 11 mo. My FIL once told my husband who is a licensed contractor that airflow wasn't part of HVAC/R it was an entirely different industry, the "V" in HVAC stands for ventilation another word for airflow. What I would do in your place is go to area A/C biz's first thing when they open and offer to work min wage even part time if that is all they have, find the local supply houses & cosy up to the counter guys as they usually know who is hiring, but please don't waste your money because even w/ 11 mo trade school you will still have to apprective for 4 yrs making anywhere btwn min wage & $13 / hour.
thanks

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green in Baltimore, Maryland

95 months ago

everbody is in it. but claims its not worth it...is that just a way to get rid of the competition?i asked if not hvac what other trade is worth it....?

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

95 months ago

green in Baltimore, Maryland said: everbody is in it. but claims its not worth it...is that just a way to get rid of the competition?i asked if not hvac what other trade is worth it....?

Why not get a actual college education and a BA or BS degree in CS or Engineering. You are in NY where there is a ton of financial assistance available and the unemployment for those with real degrees in the sciences is almost 0%.

none of this trade school, snake oil bullcrap. A state school costs a little more than Lincoln Tech

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Chris in Newnan, Georgia

95 months ago

I was in it for 6 years. They lie and use you for what the can get. They will never care about you and it will never be worth it. I am much happier not that I am out. The money is great during part of the year and very bad during the other. At times you might think you are making good money but when you take in what you made all year is not more the a normal job. Ask the unemployment office what trade is in there most. and ask the owner of the HVAC companies do they care. NOT WORTH IT. DON'T LET THEM FOOL YOU.

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

95 months ago

I have owned 2 hvac/electrical companies, and managed a couple also. When hiring people, the hvac schooling only meant one thing to me, thier heart might be into sticking around. They were probably not just getting a temporary job. If you read all the comments listed on this sight, you will learn a lot. The location you live in has a lot to do with employment ops. HVAC is a life, and the first couple years are hard on pay, but if you are into it, and can hack it knowing that, you'll be ok. HVAC is like any other trade, as in if your really good, you climb the ladder more quickly. As to your question is there another trade, I have trained dozens of guys, and some like electrical better, it's about the same $, easier in every way, and less dirty. I like both trades, the hvac lets me have a challenge, and I like science.I started out making 7.50, within 6 yrs was at 17.60, then started a comany making around 75k a year for 6 years, sold it for 20k to manage another comany with 12 trucks, making 28 per hr, now I own anothr company,keep my prices fair, and do the best job poss. for every customer, do not advertise, work 4-6 days a week, and make more than I ever have in my life. Hope that helps man, good luck.

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green in Baltimore, Maryland

95 months ago

thanks that did help...i relieving not to hear negative feedback about hvac...i just wanted know how to steer this ship

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

95 months ago

I've had a couple of guys help me steer my ship, you need that. If you or anyone else have any other questions about my exp. w/ hvac, electrical or plumbing, feel free to hit me back, I like to pass on what was done for me in my life so far. My email is apositiveenergy@aol.com. Keep em comfortable, and keep the bills paid.

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raflo in Muskogee, Oklahoma

93 months ago

Well, I know this post is pretty old, but just in case any one else happens to stumble upon this like I did, I'm going to share my opinion. Ive been in Hvac for a little over 7 years. VoTech during high school for 2 yrs and the other 5 yrs out in the field. I recommend to take advantage of free schooling and ones that specialize in troubleshooting not the ones that do installation practices as you can learn that out in the field. I've done Service, Commercial, Light Industrial, and Residential New Construction. Yes you are always in the elements and it can get unbearable, but theres cons to every job. I do hate remodels or retros, not sure what your know it as and my advise on that is: try not to get stuck doing only those or that will become your specialty. As far as the pay, everyone has to pay their dues when they start, cant expect to start up top, but the best paying in my opinion is commercial/industrial and service. Rates do vary from place to place and even from company to company in the same town, but its a living you can make. And yes, its true that there is either feast or famine, but if you can manage your money correctly you can make pretty good money in less time than in other trades. Maybe it evens out at the end of the year, as the pay of another job, but you get more time off this way. Point is, I'm 23 yrs old, been doing it for 7yrs total and I love it. If you work hard and smart, and try to better yourself by learning several different aspects of the trade and not limit yourself on the things you can do, you will do pretty good for yourself. I never cut corners, I'm meticulous with my work(since it will become my reputation), and I try to find the most efficient way of doing things. I work for myself now and most of my work so far has been word of mouth. When dealing with customers always be respectful and courteous even when they're not, and try to never bad mouth others and let your work speak for its self: people WILL notice the difference.

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

93 months ago

I have commented many times in this forum, and I agree with most of the things you commented, and realy live some other comments you posted. I was your age when I started my first company doing hvac, and I say good work, and values young man. If you keep those...... you will have what it takes, if you get up, are on every job, and on time as much as poss. you have a company that will break the 95% rule, within 5 years 95% are done, and get another job. I have beat the odds before, good luck, you seem to be on the correct page, if thr quality of your work is great. I like to see a young man get it, I wish you all the best.

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InvernessAir in Inverness, Florida

92 months ago

PRO's: The job will keep both your mind and body in top physical condition as service technicians on a daily basis must use their problem solving skills, the field is ever-chaging so reading skills are continually honed by professional who subscribe to and read the trade mags, the body is sculped by the heavy lifting, walking, etc. The pay should be going up substatially over the next 10 years as both The News and the US Dept of Labor are forcasting a tech shortage due to high schoolers being sholved into college instead of skilled trades for the past 2 generations, and although there is no recession-proof job a good HVAC/R tech or mechanic is always needed by some company somewhere. The pay can be great for the tech who can figure out what no one else can or the installer who can work not just fast, but accurately.
CON's it is physically demanding work and can be hard on the body. The pay for the firt 5 years (even with tech school) is pretty low, but even though the pay is pretty bad you won't have a pile of student loans. Many companies have very few if any benefits, but that depends on the company. There are a lot of unscrupulous contractors out there who take advantage of customers and their employees so techs must always be vigliant about who they work for.
Personally I run my husbands company and I LOVE HVAC and so does he, I can't imagine making a living another way, there is a lot of personal satisfaction in this industry! Oh and most HVAC/R people are really nice!!

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

92 months ago

Lots of good information about the trade, I like what you have to say. It's cool to see other people I don't know live with the same carear and thoughts. The only thing I might slightly disagree with (even with a company called Positive Energy) is I think for the most part hvac people are nice, although there are many with huge ego's, and that is something to watch out for. I was tought by a few wise men to check ego's at the door, and I agree.

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

92 months ago

apositiveenergy@aol.com in Collegeville, Pennsylvania said: Lots of good information about the trade, I like what you have to say. It's cool to see other people I don't know live with the same carear and thoughts. The only thing I might slightly disagree with (even with a company called Positive Energy) is I think for the most part hvac people are nice, although there are many with huge ego's, and that is something to watch out for. I was tought by a few wise men to check ego's at the door, and I agree.

OOHH, and I want to put it out there, if you want to know about how people that DO HVAC feel about the HVAC trade, read ALL of the comments listed, not just a few, these people live the life, the info in my opinion is 90+% corrrect. With all do respect I read questions that were answered many times, it doesn't bother me, I just feel you will get what you are looking for by reading the whole thing, not cliff notes that we all have purchased at one time or another in our lives, career choice is big.

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Erik in Lebanon, Oregon

92 months ago

apositiveenergy@aol.com in Collegeville, Pennsylvania said: Lots of good information about the trade, I like what you have to say. It's cool to see other people I don't know live with the same carear and thoughts. The only thing I might slightly disagree with (even with a company called Positive Energy) is I think for the most part hvac people are nice, although there are many with huge ego's, and that is something to watch out for. I was tought by a few wise men to check ego's at the door, and I agree.

I think you have the right attitude, and I think it is all too common for the "American Way" to be bitching about your job. I personally want to be working for myself in a year or 2 but really don't know exactly how to go about it yet. Do you have any suggestions for me?

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

92 months ago

To go out on your own in the hvac industry, how long it will take to have a good rep. is how many kinds of heating you advertise. Two years is not enough experience in the trade to be a well rounded, all service company.As a small comany I do every type of hvac, and still suppliment it with electrical and plumbing to give you an example. Otherwise it would not happen.

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Erik in Lebanon, Oregon

92 months ago

That's pretty much how I feel. I should mention that I have an excellent installer and a good service guy that are on board with me. I know 2 years isn't alot, I am planning on a couple years from now. And I do know that 4 years isn't much either. What I need to learn mostly is warranties and other administrative skills. It's also hard cause I work for a good guy/friend, and I need to focus on areas that are not so local so as not to step on toes and have too much direct competition.

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chris in Mansfield, Texas

92 months ago

Daytondave in Dayton, Ohio said: Those pay rates seem totally off the scale for anything i have seen in my area/state. Maybe im misunderstanding you but you are saying a new guy in your area can make $14 a hour, and a guy with a few years experience under his belt can get $30 a hour? A new guy/apprentice in my city/state, it seems like they only want to pay you minimum wage (if that!) like 7 bucks a hour. Ive talked to guys who have been doing it for 4-5 years and are finally getting up to around 14-15 a hour-if they are with a good company. 30 bucks a hour? Not around here. It is very discouraging for the new guy starting out when he is offered a job at such low wages. Hey, i understand that you cant start out on the top of the pay scale and i dont expect to but then again who on earth can honestly make a living on $7 a hour with no insurance benefits? Walmart pays better than that.
Maybe im wrong but damn, i only wish they would pay what you are quoting in my state. Things are hard right now, $14 bucks a hour would be a dream come true for many guys i know.
Im sorry if i sound like im venting or being rude, and im not trying to dispute what you are saying. Its just the way the economy is these days and seeing so many people out of work that really gets to me at times.

in fort worth, tx the union local 146 is journeyman wage at 5 years experience and 26.33hr free medical insurance. aprentice start out at 14 and raises every 6months.

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chris in Mississauga, Ontario

90 months ago

Hello. HVAC is a VERY lucrative career. You can work for a company or for your self. I have worked for hundreds of companies over the years. I'm a contractor. I set my own hours and my own rate. I am always busy (my choice). I started at the bottom making very little, but after a year I went to another job, then another. Now I have my own company and I make over 758 K every year before tax. I would go to www.practicehvac.com or to www.hvacstudyguide.com if i were you because it will help you pass the test. It has nothing but GREAT reviews, so visit thoes sites and get the progam and study! Good luck!

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

I have posted a few comments on this site, and commend you on your income, Canada seems to be a great place for hvac for you. How many trucks do you have out there, and what percentage of your calls are a/c up there? Also, one more question, how is the economy doing where you live and work? Thanks,
Bryan

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Mike in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

Any of you guys complaining about the long hours and on-call should try working in train service for a railroad. Then you'll find out what it REALLY is to have no life. You'll be on-call 24/7/365 basically for the rest of your life. Working conditions? Not much better than HVAC. No crawl spaces, but you're out in the rain/snow/ice/sleet for 12 hours at a time. You can be away from home for a few days at a time, every week. Can't make any plans because you can (and usually will) get called to wrk at any time. And before anyone says railroaders make good money- well, they do, but the trick is it only looks good on paper. Sure, you might make $50-60K a year, but factor-in your away-from-home and traveling time, and you're not making much more than minimum wage.

Just saying- next time you think HVAC is so bad, remember there are worse ways to make a living.

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apositiveenwrgy@*****.*** in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

I love doing hvac
For every negative there is a positive, just like a lot of things in life.
This is simply a forum to tell the truth about the hvac
career. there are a lot of jobs out there then are a lot worse, and a lot of jobs that are I'm sure better. most of the comments here come from men that have lived the h vac life for many years, I always suggest to people with questions to read them all.

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GREEN in Perth Amboy, New Jersey

90 months ago

i wanna hear about the pro's... how would you go about gettn ahead fresh out of school..? in what field of hvac would be the best to get in? keep in mind, i have the capitol and the team to start my own biz.... any possite reply would be great... but i can handle the bad..... (NEW JERSEY)

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

In response to starting your hvac buisness with capitol, and crew:

As far as the buisness side, get the " Entrepreneur's Handbook" available from the US government. It helped with my first buisness. 2nd- fictitious name, 3rd EIN (tax #) 4th bank account (they need steps 2 & 3) 5th know at least 3 years of paying very close attention at another company teaching you, at least. TALKING RESIDENTIAL, THERE ARE 4 FUELS AND 10 WAYS TO DO EACH, X 10 MANUFACTURERS EACH WITH THIER OWN DIFFERENCES.***************THIS TRADE DOES, DOES DEAL WITH FAMILIES LIVES, IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO KNOW THE TRAINING.

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Collegeville, Pennsylvania

90 months ago

Pros to the HVAC carear:
1) Peaple will always need it. (when it is cold, no heat = call us)
2) The people that can afford central a/c feel the same as #1.
3)HVAC combines science and math, I like that.
4)The jobs look realy cool when they are done.
5)Contractors do not try to do your job(unless it is a little part)
6)You make people comfortable for a living! A psychiatrist is slow.
7)It takes the same smarts as higher schooling to do this,$ for..
8)I have 4 contractors that sub NOTHING but HVAC, they do the rest.
9)You are never doing the same thing every day.
10)You are needed, no matter what the economy, as soon as possible.

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

90 months ago

apositiveenergy@aol.com in Collegeville, Pennsylvania said: Pros to the HVAC carear:
1) Peaple will always need it. (when it is cold, no heat = call us)
2) The people that can afford central a/c feel the same as #1.
3)HVAC combines science and math, I like that.
4)The jobs look realy cool when they are done.
5)Contractors do not try to do your job(unless it is a little part)
6)You make people comfortable for a living! A psychiatrist is slow.
7)It takes the same smarts as higher schooling to do this,$ for..
8)I have 4 contractors that sub NOTHING but HVAC, they do the rest.
9)You are never doing the same thing every day.
10)You are needed, no matter what the economy, as soon as possible.

How do you get a job without experience if you are older (say over 30, 35 is the new 50 in the working world) and what type of training would you suggest?? A school like Porter & Chester wants $30,000 for an 18 month program

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David in Ottawa, Ontario

90 months ago

chris in Mississauga, Ontario said: Hello. HVAC is a VERY lucrative career. You can work for a company or for your self. I have worked for hundreds of companies over the years. I'm a contractor. I set my own hours and my own rate. I am always busy (my choice). I started at the bottom making very little, but after a year I went to another job, then another. Now I have my own company and I make over 758 K every year before tax. I would go to www.practicehvac.com or to www.hvacstudyguide.com if i were you because it will help you pass the test. It has nothing but GREAT reviews, so visit thoes sites and get the progam and study! Good luck!

I have never seen any great reviews for this sites, This guy is just trying to promote his websites, I am sure he is not even fully licensed. He has videos on you tube just look up chrismartin1978, he does not look like he makes 758k a year living in a crappy apartment. Don't trust this guy.

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Robert in Round Rock, Texas

88 months ago

I dont know what your all talking about, my school in Austin, Tx has job placement with over 8 different HVAC company's and they picked us up right after graduation and I am 31 and in great shape, you other people talking about being to old because your over 25 need to get your fat ass outside and exercise for once in your lifes. HVAC is a great career path and a good secure job in the market today, just make sure your school has job placement and your golden!

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Jim in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

88 months ago

Robert in Round Rock, Texas said: I dont know what your all talking about, my school in Austin, Tx has job placement with over 8 different HVAC company's and they picked us up right after graduation and I am 31 and in great shape, you other people talking about being to old because your over 25 need to get your fat ass outside and exercise for once in your lifes. HVAC is a great career path and a good secure job in the market today, just make sure your school has job placement and your golden!

I think that it is great that your school provided placement with HVAC companys. But I will say this in great shape or not this field can be and is very demanding on the body. I have had knee surgery and back surguery allready, from job related accidents that could not of been easily avoided. Carpal tunnel in both wrists from sheet metal work and fabrication, and well the unavoidable arthritious (sp) in the shoulders from continous use. All work related. Granted in most trades this will and can happen. So as for getting off of "your fat ass" as you say only will just delay the degragation of your body. I have been in this field for over 24 years and it is not the bed of roses that some schools say that it can be. And lastly just because you went to school does not mean that you'll get great pay, when I started out I was only getting $2.25 an hr. ( student wage) since I was not out of high school yet.

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

88 months ago

Robert in Round Rock, Texas said: I dont know what your all talking about, my school in Austin, Tx has job placement with over 8 different HVAC company's and they picked us up right after graduation and I am 31 and in great shape, you other people talking about being to old because your over 25 need to get your fat ass outside and exercise for once in your lifes. HVAC is a great career path and a good secure job in the market today, just make sure your school has job placement and your golden!

I am 36 and 5'6" around 140LBS -- didn't know that was considered 'fat'.. And maybe it is different around Austin TX but it sure isn't that easy to find a job here in the northeast if you are just getting into the field at say 30 or older.. What school is this exactly?? All I see are these fly by night trade type schools that want $30,000...

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Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts

88 months ago

I am 36 and 5'6" around 140LBS -- didn't know that was considered 'fat'.. And maybe it is different around Austin TX but it sure isn't that easy to find a job here in the northeast if you are just getting into the field at say 30 or older.. What school is this exactly?? All I see are these fly by night trade type schools that want $30,000...

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Tony in Mississauga, Ontario

87 months ago

I disagree.

After reading this guys post I decided to check out www.practicehvac.com and his other site ... what ever it was... He had a nice site and after a bit more research I found a coupon code.

I decided to try it out. It was only 9 bucks after the coupon. I actually found a lot of stuff that would help anyone trying to get their G3 or G2.

I tried out the card memory game and some puzzle piece game. The interactive test was actually pretty nice too.

Anyways, in the end I think that this site is legit and the product is more than enough to help anyone wanting to get their license.

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Tony in Mississauga, Ontario

87 months ago

I just noticed that this chris guy is from my home town LOL.

What a small world we live in!

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Gabe in Manassas, Virginia

85 months ago

...HVAC field is great, I took my first HVAC class at age 34 (Jan 2009) after having a close to death experience/car accident. my head, neck, back and left leg still hurt every now and then from the car accident, but the so called HARD HVAC WORK didnt make my body wear down faster or get worse, it actually made me feel better and healthier, you just need to be careful...good luck

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MikeD in West Babylon, New York

84 months ago

Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts said: That is really nice but you have to get someone to hire you first (which may be hard if you are older than 20 and don't have experience).

Your comment sounds like baseless hedonistic wishful thinking. Wishful & positive thinking is nice but not reality and won't pay the bills

You're so completely wrong and shame on you for being such a downer on a positive thinker. Keep your self inflicted misery to yourself. I'm 33 years old and just starting out in HVAC after 2 years of working for a machinery company fixing CNC lathes. In the past, I have had jobs in roofing, Jiffy Lube, bartending, serving, restaraunt management, and sales. I'm starting out in HVAC as a parts runner/helper. I took a pay cut and I'm traveling further to work. In my second week, I was already out on an install and being a big help for one of the techs. He showed me what to do, how to do it and I did a good job. I learned a LOT and I'm learning so much more as I go. I will do my time. I will learn as much as I can as quickly as I can. It will pay off if I stick with it. It was 154 degrees in the attic where I was running the condensate lines. It was hurting my back to crouch in positions up in the rafters. Luckily, I'm strong enough to lift an air handler unit and fit it through to the attic for the tech waiting up there to pull it the rest of the way up. Sweat, blood, some may even tear. The lady was happy to have comfort in her home from the whole new system we put in. That was rewarding(so was the $50 tip) The days fly by at work, even the days when I work 3 hours overtime. I'll buy tools, study, watch the other techs, go to classes, etc. I know I will do great if I work hard at it. In time I will be making great money and I will have skills that I can take with me anywhere. Forget negative idiots like this guy. Have a game plan and stick with it. If you're strong(able to lift 100+ lbs.), have heart and determination you can do it!

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apositiveenergy@*****.*** in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania

84 months ago

You almost have the right attitude, I like your determination. You will find, as a skill of the trade, killing people with kindness, and not letting negitivity anger you will not only keep you happier, it will land you more work. It is hard to find well rounded, hard working, knowledgable and reliable hvac techs these days. The ones that are those people, companies will do a lot to hold on to( $ and bens.). People will ALWAYS need hvac, God bless it.

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xjxrat in Hollywood, Florida

76 months ago

www.hvac123.weebly.com I met this man and he said don't waste your money on school.Buy my books and save your money for tools your going to need.I took this man advise and I'm working for a hvac company now after reading the books,I study all the time still and go to johnstone supply for free classes they offer.I have met so many techs there and learned more from this than any school could teach.Try it out and post to let us know how you made out.

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jackcoal in MWC, Oklahoma

75 months ago

Does anybody have experience as a refrigeration maintenance technician, whether in a supermarket or industrial setting? I'm currently engaged in self study to become a refrigeration maintenance technician. In april of 2010 I earned a B.S. in health science but not able to acquire a college degree level job in this field. I'm age 53 and still very ambitious. I refuse to let my age stop me. hvac education training programs are ridiculously expensive and hvac apprenticeship training programs opportunities are hard to come by. so I'm going to acquire epa 608 certifications on my own and go from there. The Mighty Lord says SEEK AND YE SHALL FIND, MATTHEW 7:7.

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hvac apprentice in Turlock, California

73 months ago

jackcoal in MWC, Oklahoma said: Does anybody have experience as a refrigeration maintenance technician, whether in a supermarket or industrial setting? I'm currently engaged in self study to become a refrigeration maintenance technician. In april of 2010 I earned a B.S. in health science but not able to acquire a college degree level job in this field. I'm age 53 and still very ambitious. I refuse to let my age stop me. hvac education training programs are ridiculously expensive and hvac apprenticeship training programs opportunities are hard to come by. so I'm going to acquire epa 608 certifications on my own and go from there. The Mighty Lord says SEEK AND YE SHALL FIND, MATTHEW 7:7.

Yes I was recently hired as a service apprentice for a commercial refrigeration company. I have an AA degree from my local CC. Couldn't find work so went to HVAC school. I am mid twenties so my age is advantage. Your age will be a disadvantage but I believe with God all things are possible. Real talk.... This field takes 3-5 years to be capable. At your age expect to take a beating on your body. I personally recommend you try HVAC sales. Easier money and less abuse on yourself. You want to consider that just as you start getting good at your career you will be nearing 60. Do you have health problems now? Drink, smoke, etc? My advice, get a graduate degree work in healthcare.

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30th T/A in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania

67 months ago

Let me add a positive note to this topic. Back when my uncle was 37 years old, He had nothing going for him, working all low paying jobs. He decided to go to a 2 year Trade school for HVAC. He graduated top in his class, and has been doing HVAC ever since. He has been laid off twice but each time has no problem finding another job. He loves working in this field. He is currently a service tech and makes 23/hr plus gets OT PLUS makes awesome money doing side jobs.

I'm 36 years old have a 2 year degree in Mechanical Drafting & Design and been working in the field for 7 years. I have been with my current company for almost 3 years but after being laid off twice in the past due to the economy, I'm uncertain about my field. My uncle tells me all the time that I need to get into HVAC. After listening to his advice and a TON of research, I registered at the local Vo-tech in a 1 year HVAC course. I am very happy that im taking this course. This class cost me $1400 out of my pocket. I don't know if I will quit the mechanical design field completely or not but I am confident that taking this HVAC course will benefit me in the future. I believe having this HVAC certificate will open alot of doors for me.

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RobbieD in Deltona, Florida

67 months ago

A beginning HVAC tech in Florida is in for a rough ride.

IF you find a job, you will be exposed to attic temperatures of 135 degrees in the summer.

The pay is not what one could expect for all of the education/training undertaken.

One will start out doing the residential gig and usually work grueling hours in the summer, then get laid off at the end of summer.
Financial stability...no way. Find something in the medical field if you want that benefit.

I worked hVAC residential service for 8 years.

Almost starved doing that.

Got an opportunity to transition into the commercial/new construction and took it.
Did sart-ups, warranty, service, in the commercial sector for the past 14 years.

The hard work wore out both of my knees and now I'm disabled. Forgot to mention that I have nine herniated discs in my back from the heavy lifting.

The last year I worked I earned $68,000.00.

I have been electrocuted, fallen from extension ladder onto concrete, dealt with high stress daily, and yet I hung in there until I had to have surgery from the wear and tear on my body.

Does that sound like a career? It was a job. It will eventually cripple or kill you.

The decision is yours to make.

Just my .02.

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

I would agree with most of what I have read here. I am not the typical story by far and should not in any way be looked at as a possibility for anyone.I was in the HVAC / Refrigeration trade shortly after some try's and different things before I "went for it".After I graduated high school I made my first mistake, I probably should have stayed right at Stop & Shop and slid over to refrigeration back then being it was a major grocery store chain largely moving into the tri-state area and looking back at stock moves and what the company did it would have been great. But I didn't, I did this the very hard way. I worked for an electric motor company in NY on the Ct border this I must admit is not a regret and got me bigtime into commercial industrial at only 18 yrs old and very needed knowledge was picked up here lasting me a to this day. (This story might be long but I am writing this to get many messages out to those whom it may help or sadly......discourage.) So a lady comes in and she works for "Trane" I was like holy cow this is it I can do this. I wanted HVAC right out of high school but didn't want to miss out on a HS without girls all that ego crap in trade school wasn't for me, vying for 40 girls out of school with 400 guys was pathetic. The cost? Turns out this is a loss of the mandatory state required school hrs...that's right, I'm out of the gate WITHOUT any theory or actual trained time on the books! Who's in front of me on the job line in the summer of 1983? Just every other young kid pumped out of every trade school in the state! Result I do land that job @ Trane but as a sheet metal installer / tech. Not bad I guess looking back it did help me with sizing etc so to this date I still can't knock that set back yet. Now lets fast forward to what happened and how it all worked out to august 2010. I wanted a chance in 84 so I actually quit Trane and went to a shop that in retrospect made it all possible.More to come!

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

I left Trane on good terms and went to work for a guy that was known to be difficult and loud a hard on help. I learned this fast as I followed my lead guy from Trane and he got me in with this "New Shop". "Carmine" I must admit was thee guy to work for, I became the "old timer" at having been there for a year and a half and yes than I left the trade for a very long time! Remember it was around 1986 now auto mechanics were dropping like flys in fear of the "New cars" with all the new engine electronics etc carburetors were out...fuel injection was coming in. Hey it was easy money cars were my other love I bit the bullet and dived in full. After years of fighting for raises in a timely fashion etc benefits that sucked I took my auto mechanic skills and went "inside" yep I worked in a candy factory and worked on high speed machines wrapping candy. Long and short I read online that they were consolidating there plants and I and others were losing our jobs. I was fortunate as this was BEFORE the crash of 08 after a couple years I saw a posting for the HVAC dept and through some fighting and several interviews I did get the job. Fact: I am in the $30 hr range. Why many here will ask. Some of it was determination fighting to get in calculating debates with those in charge and always very much as was stated here by a woman writing about her husband and two boys you must update yourself and work at it. If you put the numbers together you may be shocked I could be out for so many years and then get in NO LICENSE YET only have my Recovery license and make $30 no way. Well it's a fact oh yeh I forgot I'm 48 now pushing 50. What did I do? I did side jobs over the years with my uncle who was a facility's guy for 40 years. We put boilers in and furnaces whenever we could. And we did them over kill. Made them beautiful safe and professional before you knew it word of mouth had us doing just fine.

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