HVAC Career PRO's vs. CON's anyone?

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

Today I work in a commercial / industrial setting in the healthcare industry were dryrooms and cleanrooms are a way of life. This I must tell you all is were it's at. An in house tech is the way to be. Training advancement etc it is how it worked out for me. Schooling was paid by my employer (that's 30 years after I graduated high school) now I only need to finish up my apprenticeship and get my S2 which is around the corner now as far as I see it after all these years! My message if you love it go for it...is this trade tough? Yes but it has rewards and if you work out just a little bit this I feel is actually good for your body. Pay attention to warning signs! Lift sensible (when I was in automotive guys were hurting themselves constantly you can hurt yourself being a weekend warrior!) wear knee pads! You don't make new knees when you sleep and that disk in your back will hurt you the rest of your life after you man handle a boiler down to the basement! Your boss yells at you "just get it done"? Remember he doesn't care once your off his disability sheet so remember it's your life! I love what I do every day. I was also blessed to do two trades in my life and a wealth of knowledge learned from both. Being in automotive helped with print reading / the motor shop helped me understand 3 phase electricity and the fundamentals of control's. Anyone getting into HVAC must know electrical if your uncomfortable around high voltage forget it. A Flash can kill you or maim you for life should you actually live through it. The explosion alone is equal to an M100 blowing up in your face so you'll lose your hearing for sure at the minimum! If you slip you can be impaled or electrocuted. If you do rooftop units you will work with 480 3 phase more than likely and it may be on a rainy day. Natural gas isn't bad but propane can blow a building off it's foundation and kill all the occupant's inside in seconds should they live they may be burned alive in the wreckage.

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

Its a responsibility that must be taken seriously.I having been in the car industry knew first hand responsibility as people have the ability to sue you should there be negligence on the part of a tech working on a car. (Imagine tires not tight on a Dodge Caravan with a young family on-board and it enters a highway in front of a tractor trailer.)IT HAPPENS more than you think! Working in this trade is the same thing. You must do this trade with concern for others even when the customer is a jerk or a bad landlord. You tell him on a service PM that an exchanger on a propane furnace is cracked and he says' yeh yeh yeh as you pull away and see a family going into the rental. You'll have to man up and report that guy for lack of action to maybe in-fact save those people. This isn't a job for yes men because even inside you'll have "weak bosses" that try and appease there bosses so you'll have to speak up........do you have it or not if not stay out because you being a coward or just don't want to "rock the boat" could in-fact get someone killed.

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

Cost of the trade: If you spend about $4k you'll be in very good shape less a van. This will cover with careful shopping a set of two stage vacuum pumps a nice M tank set up various hand tools, a N2 regulator all kinds of test equipment / gauge manifold sets etc. If I spent 3k that's a lot and I am pretty much ready for any side job besides my full time job. Just be careful and talk to the old timers on what really works etc. (I have to be careful with the old timer talk I guess). If you think about what many spend in any trade this is pretty reasonable I think considering for example what the automotive trade will cost you.Carpentry is very expensive as well for example also.

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

xjxrat in Hollywood, Florida said: www.hvac123.weebly.com I met this man and he said don't waste your money on school.Buy my books and save your money for tools your going to need.I took this man advise and I'm working for a hvac company now after reading the books,I study all the time still and go to johnstone supply for free classes they offer.I have met so many techs there and learned more from this than any school could teach.Try it out and post to let us know how you made out.

Just a heads up: The option of "passing up on schooling" is not an option for all. In-fact it is a state requirement in many states yet nothing in others. Glad you are able to go the rout you did. This was never an option where I am being Ct is a heavily regulated state.

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Mr Freeze in Connecticut

67 months ago

Nick L in Medford, Massachusetts said: How do you get a job without experience if you are older (say over 30, 35 is the new 50 in the working world) and what type of training would you suggest?? A school like Porter & Chester wants $30,000 for an 18 month program

Nick I'm confused you live in Mass? Your in the state with medical going crazy you can't get "inside as an in-house apprentice" I'm knocking on the door of 50 years old and I got in, if your in Mass they are loaded with healthcare and then there's even Cape Cod way?? Good luck! Think medical devices etc..........

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jackcoal in MWC, Oklahoma

67 months ago

xjxrat, what you've mentioned mentioned sounds fantastic because these hvac private school tuition rates are highway robbery and the community college hvac programs include classes that you don't even need,not to mention their stupid placement test. By the way, that website that you mentioned doesn't exist, i.e. www.hvac123.weebly.com. Can you correct this website address? Thanks. I really want to learn how to service super market refrigeration systems.

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chillin in Baltimore, Maryland

67 months ago

When i went to hvac school over 20 years ago my class was having a discussion About whether illegal aliens are going to get into the HVAC field as we were afraid that we would have to compete with them for a lower hourly rate/pay. most of the students in the class said that they will always stick to construction or other types of manual labor not the skilled trades. a few of us were smarter than that and said it's just a matter of time until they get into it. WELL. NOW IT'S HERE . Its not just employees it's also the owners of these companies that will do installation and service work for dirt cheap and keep legitimate good companies that have been in business for many years from competing with them especially in a rough economy where customers are looking for the rock bottom price.

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A Positive Energy in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania

67 months ago

Believe it or not, this has been going on for a long time. In cities large towns, etc., the proper authorities "crack down" on the problem for a while, and once things cool down, same game, repeat. Unfortunately, this is not a new problem. And believe it or not I have even seen an old boss import people Legally, due to a lack of good tin knockers aval. in the area - from Scotland! This is good news for people wanting to come into the trade, smart men are willing to do almost anything, to hire skilled help. Trust me, he did not do it for saving $, he had to pay for shipping them here, room and board, etc. He would have much rather hired locals. He did it many times during the time I was doing service.

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chillin in Baltimore, Maryland

67 months ago

A Positive Energy in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania said: Believe it or not, this has been going on for a long time. In cities large towns, etc., the proper authorities "crack down" on the problem for a while, and once things cool down, same game, repeat. Unfortunately, this is not a new problem. And believe it or not I have even seen an old boss import people Legally, due to a lack of good tin knockers aval. in the area - from Scotland! This is good news for people wanting to come into the trade, smart men are willing to do almost anything, to hire skilled help. Trust me, he did not do it for saving $, he had to pay for shipping them here, room and board, etc. He would have much rather hired locals. He did it many times during the time I was doing service.
I hear what you're saying. But its hard to believe that he couldn't find enough people to train in the area to do the work. there are also students continuously graduating from HVAC schools. and by the way how many hours a week do they work 50? 60? More? Do they work on the weekends also? how's about holidays? I still think there's got to be a much bigger reason for going through the expense and hassle of hiring folks from a different country.

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A Positive Energy in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania

67 months ago

Please hit understand, my boss that was hiring illegal aliens was not the man that was importing the men from Scotland. The man that was importing men from Scotland, during the late 90's and early millenium when the market was awesome. We could not find great sheet metal workers, and we had a lot of sheet metal to knock. It does sound unbelievable, but we were making great money, and those days just as today, HVAC was a skilled deprived trade. As far as how many hours they worked, or I worked, they tried to keep it as close to 40 as possible, but 50 would happen. To make a little more sense of the situation, the men did not have to work where they came from, so that did help with the room and board, if you follow.

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Heating Technologist in Calgary, Alberta

66 months ago

ben in Geneva, Ohio said: 27 year hvac tech find another field this one has almost killed me

I learned in school up here at SAIT in Calgary, Alberta, Canada that our Sheet Metal Worker program is the only trade program that goes into the most depth dealing with the trade itself. The SAIT program once completed and gaining a Red Seal Journeyman certification is infact recognized around the world by other countries because they know SAIT is one of (if not) the best Colleges to train people properly in the HVAC industry.

It's a good career path and if not you'll always have something to fall back onto later in life once you've gained your journeyman ticket.

As far as pay? Canada surpasses what the US pays, we range from $12-$39 depending on the company you work for.

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chillin in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

66 months ago

In your first response you said that they were leagal. In the second response you said that they were illegal. That's why I'm confused which one was it.

A Positive Energy in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania said: Please hit understand, my boss that was hiring illegal aliens was not the man that was importing the men from Scotland. The man that was importing men from Scotland, during the late 90's and early millenium when the market was awesome. We could not find great sheet metal workers, and we had a lot of sheet metal to knock. It does sound unbelievable, but we were making great money, and those days just as today, HVAC was a skilled deprived trade. As far as how many hours they worked, or I worked, they tried to keep it as close to 40 as possible, but 50 would happen. To make a little more sense of the situation, the men did not have to work where they came from, so that did help with the room and board, if you follow.

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cavellkim in Charleston, South Carolina

66 months ago

DaytonDave in Dayton, Ohio said: After spending 15 years working in the same factory i found myself laid off after the company closed. I qualified for a program through unemployment to send me back to school for training in another field. They would pay for all of the cost of the schooling plus allowed me to draw pretty much my regular pay of what i was making while going to school. I had no clue what to take, i took HVAC . I probably should have researched it better.
HVAC seems like a great career if you are a younger person just starting out. But if you are a bit older, like i am (pushing 40) it is next to impossible to get your foot in the door. I did great in the schooling but its as if it means nothing to any employer. It seems like every HVAC company i checked out demanded a minimum of 5 years experience before they would even look at you. Those that are willing to take in someone with no experience only want to pay 6-7 dollars a hour in my area. I never was able to get a job in the field. I ended up taking a somewhat related job, inspecting automotive air conditioning systems and parts as they are being manufactured in a factory, which isnt all so bad.
If you are a younger guy in your early 20s, go for it. If you are a bit older i would really think this through and check into it further.

Maybe a warmer climate would appeal to you. HVAC in Charleston SC is in demand. They would start you at 20.00 fresh out of the course. Big money. kim

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RobbieD in Deltona, Florida

66 months ago

Big money @ $20.00 hr?

ROFLMAO

Maybe in S. Carolina, lol.

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chillin in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

66 months ago

Actually, 20.00 starting out of school is very good. most installers / technicians don't even get close to that pay until at least 5 years in the field. The problem withthe HVAC field is that you only max out at maybe $30 an hour if you're lucky, doesn't matter whether you have 13 years experience or 35. it's really not that much money when you take into consideration all the training and many years of blood sweat and tears.

RobbieD in Deltona, Florida said: Big money @ $20.00 hr?

ROFLMAO

Maybe in S. Carolina, lol.

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chillin in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

66 months ago

I'm also assuming that's ten years after working in the field, someone we'll start having a family. Wife/kids. 15 to 25 an hour is crap when you factor in boiling hot Attics and roof tops, caring and balancing have the extension ladders and climbing and Dragging material up and down, freezing cold winters, all those missed appointments and all those other important things that you missed because this field it is very difficult to schedule things in advance. I've been in the field for over 23 years,12 of which I've had my own business. I'm finally getting out of it. There were times when was great and fun, And the money was good, And other times when money was tight and it sucked. Found something that I can actually have a life And not work as hard and still make good money without all the bull s#*t :-)

RobbieD in Deltona, Florida said: Big money @ $20.00 hr?

ROFLMAO

Maybe in S. Carolina, lol.

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RobbieD in Deltona, Florida

66 months ago

chillin in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: I'm also assuming that's ten years after working in the field, someone we'll start having a family. Wife/kids. 15 to 25 an hour is crap when you factor in boiling hot Attics and roof tops, caring and balancing have the extension ladders and climbing and Dragging material up and down, freezing cold winters, all those missed appointments and all those other important things that you missed because this field it is very difficult to schedule things in advance. I've been in the field for over 23 years,12 of which I've had my own business. I'm finally getting out of it. There were times when was great and fun, And the money was good, And other times when money was tight and it sucked. Found something that I can actually have a life And not work as hard and still make good money without all the bull s#*t :-)

Take heed, young whippersnappers. This man is right.

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Gene in Texas

65 months ago

I came into the industry at 38 years old, went to school. HVAC has been great for me. I worked in the Oregon, and latter moved to Texas. There are more jobs than there are technicians, Look on Crigslist dallas, Houston. Wages depend on what skills you have. Between 20 to 30 a hour is there for the technician with skills. The growth of the industry see's a greater need for HVAC tech. I don't any place in the country that is paying even 10 dollars an hour, if so you need to move.

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Ernest Quinones in Winter Park, Florida

59 months ago

I been in the field for about 2years and 2 years of tech school. It's so rough for us entry level guys to keep steady work. I Currently move ftom Ny to FL.Its even harder to find work down here.

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Ernest Quinones in Winter Park, Florida

59 months ago

I been in the field for about 2years and 2 years of tech school. It's so rough for us entry level guys to keep steady work. I Currently move ftom Ny to FL.Its even harder to find work down here.

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2Legit in Cincinnati, Ohio

58 months ago

Pros
*You are the expert at your job with professional knowledge... in this way, you know more about your customer's house than he or she does (that's why you're needed)
*You possess a valuable skill which will always be needed
*Your skills can allow you to become self-employed or to moonlight for extra cash
*You don't have to go to college for four years to start out making a respectable amount of money

Cons
*You deal with the public - which may mean rude people who think they're smarter than you or better than you
*Your work requires physical energy, which can cause injury or strain to your body
*Your job may carry extra risk for getting hurt
*You may have a problem, as you begin to age, wondering what you will do career-wise, if your body can no longer take this physical level of work anymore

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joey donuts in North Port, Florida

58 months ago

15 yr vet. Spent 18 mos in trade school and personally feel some sort of 2ndary education is a must. At least to open the first doors for you. Started at 12/hr and took 15.more years to get where I am today at 23.50 . Moved from philly to swfl and there is never a lack of work for people like us here in fl. It's really hot here for 6-7 months. I've done commercial and residential work doesn't matter which way you go . This industry requires back breaking work in horrible conditions. Commercial work usually on rooftop. Climbing ladders and roping your tools and materials to the top is neccessary. Equipment and tools can be heavy , and your exposed to the elements.Residential work you have to go in places that are cramped , hot (180' in fl summer) attics and creature infested crawl spaces . It's all true about the hours and missing out on stuff with family and friends. I've missed out on countless events. Every company will require , when your ready , for you to be "on-call" , you will need to be avail. 24 hours a day usually for a week and still work your 40. I work on call every third week , two off call , one on call. You will be driving alot too. You will , when your busy , live out of your truck. Most companies will give you truck and gas card . But in summer I spend more time in the truck than my house. My back , knees and feet hurt daily. If I could go back I probably would take another path. But I'm in my mid 40's and do see a career change comming anytime soon if you do come into the business. I would keep.My eyes and ears wide open , read manuals and books , use the internet. There is one thing for sure. You are only as valuable as the skills / information you possess , and no one can ever Take it from you. Hope this info. Helps . Wish I had all this info. before I made my decision .good luck.

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Jay in Montréal, Quebec

56 months ago

Wow some horror stories I see! I can't imagine how bad for the body is this. It must be better than floor installing right? I'm 27 years old in good shape and I think I can handle this but all people writing here are starting to scare me... I'm starting a year and a half course in two weeks and I'm confident that I can make a living in this trade. I visited the school with a tour of the program and was floored by the amount of stuff to learn! Once I get all this knowledge I bet it will feel great to not be a dummy anymore who can only land mcdonald jobs...

I looked at jobs opportunity here and it's true they all ask 5years experience. But If I can get in, salary after 5 years are in the 25-35 range. My plan is work my ass off until I can afford a truck and equipment and start my thing. Also I'm lucky as the school here only cost 375 buck.

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sami in San Bernardino, California

56 months ago

I have read some of these comments,some I like,some are discouraging,I just have got my HVAC certificate,after I worked 30 yrs as an electrical engineer.kind of liking this kind of work,I have worked about 3 months,in this field,and I thought to go after this HVAC certificate,I have studied through the internet,and I went for the test,and I have got my HVAC epa608 universal.now,is my problem,where to put my first step??I keep looking for some companies to hire me,but,I dont find any.help please,what should I do??? and where to go????
thanks for the advise...

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top tech in Florence, Kentucky

55 months ago

Most of this thread is shockingly differnt from my experience. I'm 29 and I started with a company and had zero experience in 2010. They sent me to a crash course and started me at 18 hr. In 2 years I advanced to 25 as a technical advisor. I left for a company closer to home. I started with this company as a lead tech at 22 hr. I do the sales training with other techs to improve avg tickets. I don't sell equipment but I have in the past. The hours suck sometimes but I look forward to slow times when they come after a busy season. Most people think all they will do is fix stuff but that is far from the truth. You have to get involved with your customer and make good recommendations to improve comfort in their homes. Most companies are very sales driven these days. You have to have a great personality and know your customer. You don't get paid for what you do, you get paid for what you know! I get challenged mentally on a daily basis. I have a thirst for knowledge not only for hvac but for sales and communication. If you have a positive attitude and understand that you will never stop learning then you will be a 75k-100k tech early in your career. I made 52k my first year and expect 80k by my 5th. I expect it because I'm worth it. Keep fighting the good fight gents and always do right by your customer.

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Trades Recruiter in Burlington/Kitchener, Ontario

55 months ago

Hey Jay:
I recruit residential HVAC Service Techs/Installers across Canada.

People I've spoken to have told me how their bodies get beaten up over time but I think it's a part of the trade.

You guys are lugging heavy equipment, often by yourselves, in either very cold or very hot weather. This is bound to beat up the best of us!

What I'd suggest is implement a long-term career plan. Start out in Install, learn the trade, get your tickets, then move into Service (which is less physically demanding), then management or sales so you can get out of the physical part of the trade but still be involved in it.

You're pursuing a very rewarding career. Good luck!

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Armyvet06 in Queen Creek, Arizona

50 months ago

so many negative comments on here, I just wanted to give my .02, I spent 8yrs in the army after i got out i really had no clue as to what i wanted to do, started looking into hvac and everyone told me i was crazy that i would make no money, id be an alcoholic on his 8th wife , I am happy that i did not listen to any of them, there is so much more to this trade than installs and service than being on call and working out of a truck, I spent my time in the field 6 yrs later im working as a ft hvac tech for the dept of veterans affairs making good money , Its like anything else you get out what you put in,

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Tinnermom in Illinois

36 months ago

Train by the local 10 sheet metal workers years ago. I tested in st. Paul Minnesota and passed the competency test which also automatically gave me my Minneapolis comp card. Universal Refrigeration license. Working for my parents is impossible but I stuck it out for 16 years. Did a lot of County work for Anoka, Minneapolis & Hennepin County. I have a lot of experience with the residential retrofit.
I would have to say after the economy crash the work just has not been there. If you are single parents who is raising your child on your own, you really need to think about this very hard before getting into it. You have to think about daycares who wants a set schedule so that they can have appropriate staff for the amount of kids in their daycares. Unless you have a family member who can watch your children for you.. you will get stuck in contracts and have to pay whether you are working or not. For example I started a new job and they were slamming me with work and one reason was because I was the only one carrying the license for the areas they needed jobs done in. First day on the job... guys I was working with were being kicked off by inspectors because they didn't have their cards. New job was going great!!! HVAC is very seasonal and like I said has not been doing well since the crash. All the Big jobs were completed and I was put on call the first day my son started his summer daycare. Now I'm stuck in this contract and after 4 weeks of being on call, Of course with no jobs coming in I got stuck paying for this daycare I don't even need but still have to keep it available in case I'm called in. $600.00 for an eight year old is what I paid for the last 4 weeks for daycare I didn't even need. That's a pretty hefty bill for one person especially when you don't have income coming in. Yes there is unemployment but you have to wait for that unemployment to actually get in your account and they like to dilly-dally let me tell you. You will be laid off a lot.

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Tinner Mom in Hilltop, Minnesota

36 months ago

In Minnesota you have to have HVAC license in order to even work in Minneapolis or st. Paul Minnesota. I trained for mine through the sheet metal workers Local 10. It is free training but you are stuck in a 10-year contract working for only Union shop. I did this years ago so I'm not sure how they work it nowadays. My experience is residential retrofit but I heard the union was trying to go commercial. I believe I paid $500 per year but then when you are all finished with schooling you are reimbursed. I did 3 years of schooling I believe they've added one more year but I'm unsure. They will also penalize you for not going to school which is a fee out of your $500 you pay every year.
I found that you are laid off quite a bit which is just fine for me although I get stuck paying daycare fees do you to daycare contracts. You definitely want to say when you are working so you are prepared when you are laid off. For example last year I was paid $26 an hour but still made under $40,000 for the year and that's my unemployment included in that. Remember if you don't accumulate hours you don't accumulate unemployment. When the economy crashed my unemployment started skydiving way down every year until I was under $200 a week. I'm a single mom who gets stuck in daycare contract because when I'm on call I have to have daycare available. I've been laid off for 4 weeks and my daycare bill for that four weeks is $600. I started a new job and could have had a friend babysit on an on-call basis which would have saved me quite a bit of money because I wouldn't have the $600 bill. I didn't want the chance of her family getting sick and having to take sick days when I had just started a new job because I didn't feel that would keep my job. Just really have to pinch your pennies if you're going to go this route. $26 an hour is great but I still live paycheck-to-paycheck because really I'm not making that $26 an hour everyday. Used to be $700 a week not no more

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Alex in Wheaton, Illinois

31 months ago

weldit777 in Evansville, Indiana said: I'm in my early 20's and considering making a change from welding to hvac . will my welding background help in hvac? also i'm considering taking a 2 semester program to get certified, or should i get an associate to break into the field. appreciate it.

Your welding background will have little effect on an hvac career but it doesn't hurt to have it on your belt. My advice is to take as many classes and get as many certifications as you can if you're serious about making the switch. It is a very competitive market and very hard to complete with other technicians to be among the best of the best. Good luck brother

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xjxrat in Pompano Beach, Florida

31 months ago

jackcoal in MWC, Oklahoma said: xjxrat, what you've mentioned mentioned sounds fantastic because these hvac private school tuition rates are highway robbery and the community college hvac programs include classes that you don't even need,not to mention their stupid placement test. By the way, that website that you mentioned doesn't exist, i.e. www.hvac123.weebly.com . Can you correct this website address? Thanks. I really want to learn how to service super market refrigeration systems.

Hello Jack, It has been along time since I wrote that.Don't get me wrong about school. School is good but if you are just starting out you need to see if this trade is right for you.By ordering some books to read will give you a heads up if your going to like the trade.If you commit to school and do not like it then you wasted your time and money.There is a lot of money to be made.20-30 an hour working for someone. I charge a flat rate of 100 per hour working for myself.If the job takes 3 hours to do i charge 300 if it take me 4 hours to do a 3 hour job I still only charge 300. working on chillers is the money maker 40-60 per hour working for someone.

I work in the pharmaceutical industry, a lot of fun an money very challenging.
my new web site is
www.accoilcleaningcompany.weebly.com

Glad to read to pros an cons xjxrat

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Neil in Westminster, Massachusetts

14 months ago

It's all the same in construction work. Mechanic or helper. The only people that really make out are the owners. Your just a number to them. Electricians are treated the same way in construction. Unless you have a certification and years of experience. As far as recommending it. It would be like recommending someone try acid or heavy drugs.

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commander of orcs in Chicago, Illinois

13 months ago

weldit777 in Evansville, Indiana said: I'm in my early 20's and considering making a change from welding to hvac . will my welding background help in hvac? also i'm considering taking a 2 semester program to get certified, or should i get an associate to break into the field. appreciate it.

the EPA card and 1 heating clasd and 1 refrigeration/A.C. class is all you need. the rest of the classes are filled. the hvac associates is only useful in transferring some of it to a university for a 4 year degree, otherwise don't waste your time.

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commander of orcs in Chicago, Illinois

13 months ago

green in Baltimore, Maryland said: thanks that did help...i relieving not to hear negative feedback about hvac ...i just wanted know how to steer this ship

do you really want to roll around in dirty crawlspace and lug 400lb. furnaces from 1956 up basement stairs and then good luck getting it onto the truck. not done yet, then you gotta get it off at the scrap yard. oh I forgot about the old air conditioners, minus the stairs those are equally fun. every hvac guy I worked for was a whiny ass****. who in there right mind would go to school to be physically and mentally abused in this way on a daily basis, automotive or tool and dir or graphic arts/printing are all better options, he'll even welding is better. hvac is better than carpentry, concrete and painting about on par with plumbing and worse than all other trades. this is my opinion I wasted about 5 years getting a degree in this stuff.

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commander of orcs in Chicago, Illinois

13 months ago

commander of orcs in Chicago, Illinois said: the EPA card and 1 heating clasd and 1 refrigeration/A.C. class is all you need. the rest of the classes are filled. the hvac associates is only useful in transferring some of it to a university for a 4 year degree, otherwise don't waste your time.

the rest of the classes are FILLER

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commander of orcs in Chicago, Illinois

13 months ago

stick to welding, being in a shop or out on an oil field sounds like dream compared to rolling around in the Anderson's dusty basement, or how bout a nice steamy attic, those are the best. I'm of the minded that a really good TIG welder can make more money than a good hvac guy or at least equal but the welder won't be killing himself, breaking his back.

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commander of orcs in Chicago, Illinois

13 months ago

stick to welding, being in a shop or out on an oil field sounds like dream compared to rolling around in the Anderson's dusty basement, or how bout a nice steamy attic, those are the best. I'm of the minded that a really good TIG welder can make more money than a good hvac guy or at least equal but the welder won't be killing himself, breaking his back.
plus you can get into robotic welding programming or electron beam, plasma tables, there's many possibilities

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Hvac in New Orleans, Louisiana

10 months ago

mrfreeze in Connecticut said: Just a heads up: The option of "passing up on schooling" is not an option for all. In-fact it is a state requirement in many states yet nothing in others. Glad you are able to go the rout you did. This was never an option where I am being Ct is a heavily regulated state.[/QUOTE. How much can I make as has a helper. I'm
A diesel mechanic. Diesel isn't a great career. After 9 years. Of working toward nothing. A alot of mechanic are getting out the trade due to low pay.

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yourbetterhalf in North Battleford, Saskatchewan

1 month ago

Hvac Pro in Las Vegas, Nevada said: funny glutton for puns can hang , but love doesnt pay the bills or nob jobs with skills either.

WOW...YOU should go back to school to develop your grammar skills. First, learn to write. Then talk down others mate.

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