The true facts about MT salaries and pay

Get new comments by email
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.
Page:  « Previous   1  2  3  4  5  Next »   Last »

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

117 months ago

Part 3:

I have tremendous respect for the MT’s that I have trained under these last years. There is an obscene amount of knowledge to be gained from those who have spent many years in the lab in the service of clients/patients. I am most grateful for their willingness to share hard-earned “pearls of wisdom” with me and my fellow classmates. But if you think that making yourself a necessity by law rather than by actual necessity is the way to improve your station, you have a lot to learn.

Reply

Jim in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

117 months ago

The big difference between the MLT and MT is the knowledge that MT acquire in their education. The MLT and MT have seperate ASCP exams which tells you the level of difficulty that MT have for the ASCP. I am just saying their has to be a standard set fourth. No one will get into the field if a 2 year degree can do the same job as 4 year degree. Not everyone that gets the 4 year degree wants to get into management. So if a 4 year degree graduates and wants to work as a tech, they should be paid well, equiv to RN's, but since there is a lower degree as a option the pay scale will always remain low.

Reply

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

117 months ago

Giardia, I hear this too often "It took me 3.5 years to get my AS degree". It is still considered a 2 year degree no matter how long it took to obtain your degree. You are still new in the profession that is very interesting and I hope you will continue. The point is and you'll find out when you get your paycheck, that even as a MLT you're not paid well compared to other allied health professions with a 2 year degree. So MT or MLT doesn't matter, it is still a profession that is not seen at the same level as the rest of healt workers and that is what we want to change.

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

117 months ago

Jim Part One: Jim, Though the MLT curriculum is very demanding, I am not arguing that it is as demanding as the MT curriculum. I have taken enough CE and BOR preparatory exams geared towards MT's and those written specifically for MLT's to know that there is a difference. There was however not enough of a difference to cause me to do less than adequate on any of the exams I took (I have passed them all with honorable scores). The most glaring educational differences that I have found, I have already noted above. My point is that many here are arguing for the exclusion of a very qualified subset of Lab professionals in order to increase your own pay. That group of professionals has been in the laboratory for a very long time, since the beginning of clinical laboratories in fact, and used the same texts and covered nearly the same material as you did in MT prep.
Blame the curriculum changes in the Associate degree program that are sending out competent and adequate laboratorians. Blame some of the automation that has made practical application knowledge the safety standard. Blame lab management/physicians for not adopting the new methodologies that you, as an MT, have been exclusively prepped to easily adopt. OR, Keep blaming me if you like. Just be aware that your argument that MLT's are not competent to send out results has no merit. They do it every day of the week here with no discernible negative effect on the client or patient outcome.

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

117 months ago

Jim Part two:
MLT's keep patient costs down. Heck, In sheer number alone they afford the profession far better patient outcomes. There are not enough trained MT's, certified or uncertified, to fill the MT need right now. Imagine the ensuing negative outcome if half of the laboratory staff (A.S. trained MLT's) is released from duty. It would take at least 20-30 years (with maximum recruitment and no loss of current staff) and a 8-10 X increase in the current number of MT programs in order begin to meet the demand for MT's in that scenario. That still doesn't take the projected increased need of the next 10 years into consideration.
Sure you can advocate for MLT’s to be removed from the lab and BSMT as the standard to report results. But your workload increases dramatically, skeleton crews will not just be for the 3rd shifters anymore, small hospital labs become a thing of the past as all but the most crucial tests will get shipped out to large local reference lab, and decline in patient outcome will be rapid and rampant. The industry could feasibly recover in a few decades. Yeah, that makes perfect sense. A few people die, a few more suffer needlessly, even more hate their jobs, and the industry is forever changed. But hey, you get that $5 dollar raise you wanted, right?

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

117 months ago

Flint, When I left the Uni I was 19 credit hours away from a Bachelors of Science in Biology. I don't say "I have a Bachelors degree" because I don't have a bachelors degree. I understand the difference between an Associate and Bachelors, in reality and in perception.
I researched extensively before choosing this path. I am well aware of what I will be paid, don't believe it is adequate, but chose the program anyway because it allows me to feed the family (doing something I love) while continuing my studies. I have so far been, and will continue to be a vocal advocate for the profession. I absolutely do not believe wages are adequate, I absolutely believe there should be clearer distinctions between the duties of the MLT and the MT, but I also am certain that negating the contributions and sound education of an important member of the laboratory team is NOT the way to increase wages.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My posts are to advocate for myself and fellow MLT's that swing by here and are offended by the insinuation that we are mere SCABS crossing some sort of picket line and preventing the REAL Lab staff from negotiating with management. lol
I received a tentative offer recently; I have every intention of taking it the day I graduate. It's a great position, the pay is $3.00 higher than average starting pay with an amazing shift diff (the pay request was an arbitrary number I pulled out of my butt just to feel the waters out - I was not actively looking for a position), and it will allow me to continue my studies with tremendous support and little interference.
Nope, No apologies from me for being an MLT student. You'll have to grab another bus, this one doesn't carry BS.

Reply

Jim in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

117 months ago

Most if not all allied health fields in the hospital have set standards to work in the profession. Why is the laboratory different? Pharmacy you need a PharmD, PT you need a PTD, most if not all OT programs are masters degree programs. Why is the laboratory moving backwards? I never hear of shortages in those other degrees, they get paid well, have high standards to work, and students do not see a pharmD or ptD degree as a "stepping stone" to another career. They are happy with their career b/c of the monatary gains and the fact that their degree will be the only one that suffices in order to work.

Reply

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

117 months ago

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina said: Jim Part two:
MLT's keep patient costs down. Heck, In sheer number alone they afford the profession far better patient outcomes. There are not enough trained MT's, certified or uncertified, to fill the MT need right now. Imagine the ensuing negative outcome if half of the laboratory staff (A.S. trained MLT's) is released from duty. It would take at least 20-30 years (with maximum recruitment and no loss of current staff) and a 8-10 X increase in the current number of MT programs in order begin to meet the demand for MT's in that scenario. That still doesn't take the projected increased need of the next 10 years into consideration.
Sure you can advocate for MLT’s to be removed from the lab and BSMT as the standard to report results. But your workload increases dramatically, skeleton crews will not just be for the 3rd shifters anymore, small hospital labs become a thing of the past as all but the most crucial tests will get shipped out to large local reference lab, and decline in patient outcome will be rapid and rampant. The industry could feasibly recover in a few decades. Yeah, that makes perfect sense. A few people die, a few more suffer needlessly, even more hate their jobs, and the industry is forever changed. But hey, you get that $5 dollar raise you wanted, right?

It comes down to money, do you realize what the rush is like for pharmacy? Even when it was a B.S degree there was a huge interest with students all over the country. If students know that a BS MT degree pay well they will be a interest as well. There will be 120 slots per MT program instead of 30 if your lucky. Money talks people, if you want to stop the shortage pay well, otherwise this will go on forever. At least pay as well as a RN with a associate degree, come on this is pathetic. And the Bull**** about lab techs not having patient contact is just as bad, pharmacist make 50/hour and never leave the pharmacy.

Reply

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

117 months ago

2. Giardia you are talking about keeping the cost down, that is why they say cheap labor. I never heard of a Associate level PT or pharmacist keeping the cost down, why? b/c there are standards in the profession you cannot work with that level of degree.

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

Giardia,sounds to me like there are a lot of MTs out there who want to dictate thier own pay, not realizing the iherint economic factor of "supply & demand". There is no such thing as a pay raise fairy that you can wish upon and magically get the wages you want and desire. Markets decide, sometimes harshly, the costs. It is time to start asking yourselves " why does my chosen healthcare proffession pay less than other with seemingly equal healthcare proffessions?"

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona said: Giardia,sounds to me like there are a lot of MTs out there who want to dictate thier own pay, not realizing the iherint economic factor of "supply & demand". There is no such thing as a pay raise fairy that you can wish upon and magically get the wages you want and desire. Markets decide, sometimes harshly, the costs. It is time to start asking yourselves " why does my chosen healthcare proffession pay less than other with seemingly equal healthcare proffessions?"

MT profession pays less than other health care professions b/c the field is NOT REGULATED. If you have a standard degree with a standard certification you bet we can make equal to RN salaries. But there are other factors in the field like, MLT, AMT etc. You have other factors in the equations, this equals cheap labor. In order to be a RN associate or BS you have to pass your NCCLEX, there is no other way to be a licensed RN PERIOD, there is no other test but the NCCLEX. Same thing for pharmacy and the NAPLEX. They have a standard degree with standard cert and the professions pays well. These variences are the problem.

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

Brian, I respect you and your chosen profession. That bieng said, you are not hearing what I am trying to tell you. I realize the difficulties of becoming an MT. I do not dismiss your education or dedication. That is evident. What I am saying (for the second time)is the market has judged that the MT function can be performed just as adequately and more efficiently with no adverse effects by an MLT rather than an MT. Spewing rhetoric and calling it "cheap labor" does not explain why this is so. Simply increasing the bureaucracy by implementing more stringent and unecessary certifications will only create an artificially high demand for MTs and exacerbate an already strained health care system by driving costs up. It must be frustrating seeing the career you have chosen being usurped(as you see it) by those you deem as unqualified(cheap labor). I empathize with your plight and the millions of other jobs that have been outmoded over the decades by economic darwinism. This is not to say MTs do not serve a valuable and vital function but clearly a more efficient and cost effective method is being executed and successfully so.

Reply

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

116 months ago

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona said: Brian, I respect you and your chosen profession. That bieng said, you are not hearing what I am trying to tell you. I realize the difficulties of becoming an MT. I do not dismiss your education or dedication. That is evident. What I am saying (for the second time)is the market has judged that the MT function can be performed just as adequately and more efficiently with no adverse effects by an MLT rather than an MT. Spewing rhetoric and calling it "cheap labor" does not explain why this is so. Simply increasing the bureaucracy by implementing more stringent and unecessary certifications will only create an artificially high demand for MTs and exacerbate an already strained health care system by driving costs up. It must be frustrating seeing the career you have chosen being usurped(as you see it) by those you deem as unqualified(cheap labor). I empathize with your plight and the millions of other jobs that have been outmoded over the decades by economic darwinism. This is not to say MTs do not serve a valuable and vital function but clearly a more efficient and cost effective method is being executed and successfully so.

Maybe, do you realize that lab, pharmacy, ot, pt, nursing are all ancillary part of the hospital. The difference is that everyone of those allied health field that I mentioned have a STANDARD DEGREE with ONE LICENSE. This will be the case in the lab, because ASCP will be advocating for set standards. If there is a shortage it will only increase pay to find qualified individuals ie BSMT (ASCP). So if they pay is increased, students will show interests in getting into the field. Not only have standards increased in those allied fields I mentioned, my MT program will soon be converted into a master's program. So NO MT WILL NOT GO BACKWARDS according to your dilusional mind, MT will progress just like pharmacy and PT. Do you realize that they have just APPROVED a doctorate in CLS?

Reply

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

116 months ago

My professor said that anyone with a DCLS will be able to work with a pathologist. So the profession is not looking into higher standards, its just a matter of time. You increase standards, you increase pay, you increase interest. Dont give me this B.S about keeping cost down, apparently they havent kept cost down for PT and pharmacist which command 40/hour easy. All allied health fields have increase standards, a doctorate in CLS is now in the works in most major universites. So YES we will move foward, its only a matter of time.

Reply

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

116 months ago

Here are some reasons that people do not want standards
1. Could not pass the ascp
2. Foreign MT not eligible for ASCP
3. MLT wanting to work in the clinical lab
4. People with biology, chemistry, microbiology degrees thinking they can work
in the clinical lab without training or certification

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

Ricky, much respect for your passion and beliefs, they are comendable. You must look at this in the context of the Liassez-faire capitalist constraints we all have to function by in this "The American Economic System".It is not decided by me how much you earn. It is not decided by governing boards or certifications or liscenses. It is not decided by Brian or Giardia or you, and most importantly it is not decided by your professor.It is decided, however, by and only the market, which no one man can determine and many, many men try to predict.If you are willing to go as far as a doctorate in order to work and assist a pathologist tnan more power to you. I admire anybody with that kind of passion. I know the CLS profession is not moving backwards, I never claimed that. But if you want more money in the field applying your hard earned craft ask yourself this question," What does the market dictate and is it worth my years of education?" You may come to realize that a doctorate in CLS will be good only to teach classes in obtaining a doctorate in CLS.

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

Another reason some people(e.g. consumers)do not want artificial standards.

5. More certifications and liscenses mean harder course curriculum.
6. Harder course curriculum translate into more and more course subjects
7. more course subjects(classes) mean longer hours in institutional programs.
8. Longer hours in institutional programs translate into longer semesters
9. Longer semesters mean higher tuition to offset the costs of professors(nobody works for free).
10. Higher tuition will inevitably mean you expect to be paid more when you get out.
11. Your expectations will not be condusive towards the market(the market meaning companies e.g. hospitals,clinics, etc.) and they wiil not pay.

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

12. You will ultimatly(if not already) feel as though you are bieng under-represented and take the following actions;
a. Solicit or lobby your governing boards(ASCP) to take whatever actions necessary.
b. File suit against the companies
13. Ultimatly the defendants(hospitals,doctors offices,clinics,etc.
will have to settle giving the plaintif(you) the wage they desire.
14. Higher wages for you translate into higher costs and a lower bottom-line for the markets.
15. The markets will then pass those costs off to the consumer(everybody)
15. Health care costs go up. Insurance goes up. Inflation goes up and so on and so forth......

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

Maybe, we are not taking a economics course. Its very simple. We can easily make just as much as a RN, which hospital ARE WILLING TO PAY, if we set standards period. Hospital pay other ancillary fields well, so they WILL pay lab just as well. If hospitals have other ways to get cheaper labor they will, but if they have no other choice but to hire a BSMT (ASCP) we will get paid well.
Students are willing to go to school longer if the pay is there, look at pharmacy, kids are in >100k in school tuition and 6 years of school, b/c they know they are getting paid well.
If they know the pay is there in the clinical lab side, interest will be there and there will not be a shortage.

Reply

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

116 months ago

To my way of thinking, even the High and Mighty MT will never make as much as an RN, based on a few criteria:
1. We don't have to administer IVs, catheters, etc...
2. We don't have to administer controlled doses of possibly dangerous drugs.
3. We don't have to watch our patients die on a daily basis, some while we hold their hands.
4. We don't have to physically transfer patients from bed to bed.

The basic truth of the matter is that RNs have a much harder job than we do, both physically and mentally. Argue with me all you want, but I promise you that I am right.

MLTs, no matter what any of you think, are a necessary part of the modern clinical laboratory. Belittle us, ridicule us, make your nasty little remarks about our profession as much as you want if it makes you feel better, but the simple truth is that the labs need us. We do as much in the way of clinical training that you do and go through an extremely intensive and stressful educational regime. WE DESERVE BETTER THAN TO BE BELITTLED BY A GROUP OF BITTER, HATEFUL, INDISCRIMINATELY RUDE PEOPLE.

And if you'll notice the comments by MTs and MLTs on this forum, the more reasonable and well-thought-out comments are made by MLTs. You will also notice that the rudest and most hide-bound comments are made by a few select immovable MTs.

I find that interesting, don't you?

Reply

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

116 months ago

1. We don't have to administer IVs, catheters, etc...
2. We don't have to administer controlled doses of possibly dangerous drugs.
Not true. If our results are not interpreted right by the MT/MLT, we could cause harm or death also (PTT, K etc.) A few years ago, before the 2 year RN program started due to the shortage of nurses, MTs were paid more than RNs. RNs pay is based on the shortage and incentive programs to attrack new students. Unfortunaly, hospitals aswell as our government refuses to see the problem we are facing in our profession, because our job can be assisted by automation. Short on MT/MLTs? Let invent a new machine. This is not so much possible in nursing, but it is heading more that way (monitering by computers etc). Most hospitals in Michigan prefer to hire MTs only because MLTs are not allowed to do everything here, like reading plates in micro, blue cards in bloodbank, etc.

Reply

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

116 months ago

This cause problems in scheduling and covering shifts in the weekend and off-shift in certain departments. Not that MLTs are less capable to do the job. Also, high tech testing demands more background in science, which is not a part of MLT training.

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

Ok Rus give me a break, its not only about IV, look at physical therapist, there are plenty in my facility with a B.S degree that are making 35-40/hour. The OT, PT are not pushing drugs as you call it.
Even most xray techs with a associate degree are getting paid 30/hour. Their whole job is based on machines.
Those fields I mentioned have standards and ONE CERTIFICATION test. This is why they get paid. Its not about starting IV <pharmacist do not start IV and get paid 50/hour> or pushing drugs (PT, OT, XRAY techs do not push drugs 30-40/hour> is the fact we DO NOT HAVE A STANDARD to work for the clinical lab.
Those fields I mentioned have ONE DEGREE AND ONE CERTIFICATION.

Reply

CLS48 in California

116 months ago

In California, MTs get paid roughly the same as RNs that are not specialized. An MT with 20 years of experience hits the low to mid 40s per hour easily while RNs start at the low 30s and make roughly the same with experience.

This discussion of MTs vs MLTs in my eyes is equivalent to LPNs/LVNs and RNs. RNs make more because they can do more and are licensed to do more while LPNs are the cheaper labor and are not allowed to do all the things that RNs cans. This makes RNs more valuable to a hospital than LPNs/LVNs.

Likewise, MLTs here in Calfornia cannot verify results while only MTs can. As a result, MTs are much more valuable in the laboratory then MLTs and so the pay is given accordingly. It is only until I came to this discussion board that I realized the rest of the country was not like this. This does not make sense to me and gives me the concern about the quality of lab care in the rest of the country as a result.

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

Yea most facilites here in PA, LPN are not allowed to work in the hospitals and have to work in the nursing homes. They made it so you have a higher degree it equates to better patient care.

Remember RN and LPN take two different licensure tests.

Associate level RN and BSRN take the SAME licensure test.

Reply

Rus in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

116 months ago

And so my point is proven yet again. You are so hidebound in your thinking that you are absolutely incapable of seeing the flaws in your thinking. You refuse to try to see the points of others, you belittle a noble profession, and you think yourselves the be-all end-all of the clinical laboratory even though it is not so.

But so be it. I give up trying to influence your bitterness, even though it would be a show of your professionalism. I will not ask you any more to show a bit of tolerance or to lessen your fanatical anti-MLT rantings.

I will, however, ask you to at least allow a discussion or two about the job that MLTs are required to perform, free of your overwhelming bitterness and intolerance. There is quite a large market for MLTs and there are people out there that have legitimate questions that deserve more than your dogmatic whining.

Can you please have at least that much courtesy?

Reply

CLS48 in California

116 months ago

Well I think we have to put things in perspective. In my experience as a CLS, the technicians I've encountered did not have the knowledge to do what an MT does or at least verify results. Most are high school graduates and others have associates or BS degrees in other subjects, but have not taken micro, blood bank, hematology, UA, or any relevant lab class.

Granted, this is due to no set program for technicians in California (only until last year did 2 MLT programs come into existence here). But given this background, I find it inexcusable to let these technicians crossmatch units of blood, perform manual differentials, or identify bacteria on micro media. The most they probably should be allowed to do is put specimens on a chemistry or hematology instrument, without doing any interpretation.

Thus, it's not that I have any bias against MLTs, it's just that the "MLTs" or technicians here in CA up to this point don't have the proper education to do what a CLS does in the lab.

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

CLS48, poimt taken. MTs make more in California than in other parts of the country becuase MLTs are not allowed to perform the functions of an MT due to very unecessary REGULATIONS, even though in most parts of the country MLTs are allowed to operate at higher levels almost in par with the MT with little or no negative results. Think about that. While the cost to live in California is extremely high, most of the rest of the country has found a cost effective and more efficient way to operate thier health care. ONE ARBITRARY REGULATION OR LISCENSE will allow you to make as much money as MTs in California. But at what cost? I am not an MT or MLT, but have a basic understanding of the economic system we ALL have to abide by. What I read in these pages is self-serving egomania written by professionals who are supposed to have the best intrests of thier clients/patients foremost.

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

Maybe, why dont you ask any PT, OT or Pharmacist to see if there are any cost effective ways to lower their cost "ie cheap labor" Ok, so they way your talking, I can go to my community college and become a pharmacist, physical therapist or occupational therapist. I will think in the back of my mind that its the cost effective way to approach things. I am going to tell my friends that we can get our associates in pharmacy and work just as well as a pharmD. Boy they way your talking there is no need for 4 year degrees in any profession, I am going to see if I can find a associates to become a medical doctor.

Reply

flint MT in Fenton, Michigan

116 months ago

Reason why pay went down is that the labs don't get paid per test performed which was a huge moneymaker. Now, insurances implemented the DGR rule. For example, each patient has 3000 dollars to spend on labs while in the hospital. If the doctors orders a lot of test, the lab makes less and so does the pathologist. Pathologist still want his money so they cut on the wages of the MT/MLTs. Thats why reference labs emerged because they don't have DGR yet, but insurances are talking of using it also for reference labs also. BS RN degree came after the AS RN thats why they take the same test. Before the BS degree it was LPN and AS RN.

Reply

CLS48 in California

116 months ago

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona said: CLS48, poimt taken. MTs make more in California than in other parts of the country becuase MLTs are not allowed to perform the functions of an MT due to very unecessary REGULATIONS, even though in most parts of the country MLTs are allowed to operate at higher levels almost in par with the MT with little or no negative results. Think about that. While the cost to live in California is extremely high, most of the rest of the country has found a cost effective and more efficient way to operate thier health care. ONE ARBITRARY REGULATION OR LISCENSE will allow you to make as much money as MTs in California. But at what cost? I am not an MT or MLT, but have a basic understanding of the economic system we ALL have to abide by. What I read in these pages is self-serving egomania written by professionals who are supposed to have the best intrests of thier clients/patients foremost.

Well then if you're not an MT or MLT then you really don't understand the knowledge each profession would have and who is qualified to do what in the lab. Your assumption is that an MLT can do everything an MT does with the same skill which is not true much like LPNs and RNs.

MTs have more education, and the definition of MTs around the country is a professional who is licensed or certified to perform moderate to complex tests in the Lab. An MLT can only perform simple or waived tests. This is a big difference.

Reply

MaybeQuesnaywasright in El Mirage, Arizona

116 months ago

Brian, IF there was a way to lower PT, OT or Pharmacist economic cost the MARKET would have rooted that out a long time ago and you would have to take your obvious feelings of inadequacy out on a different profession. Your vain attempt to bring almost every other medical profession down to your bitter level by suggesting THEY lower THIER standards would be disconcerting if it wasn't so laughable. I am beginning to find myself bored with this one-sided debate with people who are willing to smear entire occupations only to justify thier lack of monetary compensation. The answers are right in front of you. Be big boys and find them for yourselves.

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

Maybe be fortune you are in a profession that you can work equal with a B.S degree b/c standards are increasing and before you know it they will require you to have a STANDARD DEGREE just like ALL ALLIED HEALTH FIELDS. PTD, PharmD, MOT, etc, you are dilusional to think that the lab will not follow suite, it is part of the allied health team in the hospital. I already know most CLS programs are converting into master degree programs, and like ricky said they just approved the doctorate of CLS.

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

116 months ago

CLS48 in California said:
MTs have more education, and the definition of MTs around the country is a professional who is licensed or certified to perform moderate to complex tests in the Lab. An MLT can only perform simple or waived tests. This is a big difference.

CLS48, that is not true. While Cali may not utilize (or even train) MLT's to their full potential many (most) other areas of the US do. Graduates of an accredited Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technology program are certified to perform moderate and high complexity tests. We have the knowledge to do so competently and we do so confidently. Many MLT's are supervisors. It doesn’t seem that your experience with "MLT's" is comparable to the majority of the US.
The Joint Commission, CAP, NAACLS, and ASCP/NCA all deem us highly qualified, adequately trained laboratory professionals. In the lab we perform the same tests, are responsible for the quality of all results, and are held to the same standards as MT's.

Reply

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas

116 months ago

MLT cannot be supervisors, according to NAACLS, MLT cannot work by themselves, if there are MLT's there must be MT on site.

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

116 months ago

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas said: MLT cannot be supervisors, according to NAACLS, MLT cannot work by themselves, if there are MLT's there must be MT on site.

( A little perturbed but highly amused :)
Did you seriously just quote NAACLS as a rebuttal to my statement about ACTUAL LABORATORY supervisory and/or technical roles. Do you even *know* what the role of NAACLS is? Do you have *any* idea what NAACLS is advocating for with regards to MT/MLT educational and role changes? LMAO
Not only do you advocate for knee-jerk reactionary standards that would be extremely detrimental to the industry and patient care --not only do you not know what you are talking about with regards to current educational standards in accredited programs -- but you also obliviously regard NAACLS- an *educational accreditation* agency that is actively advocating for the replacement of MT's with MLT's (in order to push MT's *UP* the ladder) --as an agency aligned with your own misguided views. OMG LOL.

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

116 months ago

Ricky in Lewisville, Texas said: MLT cannot be supervisors, according to NAACLS, MLT cannot work by themselves, if there are MLT's there must be MT on site.

Oh, and the NAACLS faux pas aside, You couldn't be more wrong on both counts. You might want to check the CLIA. No distinction between MT and MLT until you reach General Supervisor (ie... Lab Manager)

Reply

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

116 months ago

Some states MLT cannot set foot in a blood bank so your telling me they could be a supervisor? Supervisor of what ? a centrifuge?
In New York a MT have to present if a MLT is working, they cannot work on their own.
Giardia you are really proud of your associate degree, tell me if I can get a associates in pharmacy so I can by pass 4 years, or physical therapy, because according to you thats all you need is a associate degree.

Reply

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

This article is coming from the June 2 2008 article of advance:

Readers Weigh in on MLTs and MTs in the Lab
I have written several letters to the editor about the incorrect usage of MLTs and MTs in job descriptions and articles. One of my biggest concerns is the complete disregard when it comes to expanding the acronyms used to describe MLT/CLT and MT/CLS. MLT/CLTs are technicians, not technologists.

My soap box this time though has to do with job description. According to the position description by the ASCP, an MLT's work must be supervised by an MT. See www.ascp.org/pdf. This is not happening routinely and it may be due to the shortage of MTs or that MTs haven't realized they are responsible for the work produced by an MLT.

A few MLTs may be better workers than some MTs (especially the older, seasoned MLTs) but it is not the norm with the newer generation. Students that make it through a 4-year program have the intelligence, guts and determination to succeed. From my experience, MLT graduates are immature, definitely not as educated and just not as intelligent as a bachelor graduated student.

Case in point: we just hired a new grad MLT and this technician does not know the difference between a red cell and a white cell (failed a proficiency test) and does not know how to identify WBCs in a manual differential. How did this person graduate? Frankly, I am disgusted in the MLT program that graduated this person.

This is why we need standards in the clinical lab.

Reply

CLS48 in California

116 months ago

Nice post Brian. I read advance a lot too because it's a good laboratory magazine. I do remember reading arguments between MLTs and MTs there in different issues. One thing I have seen is that MLTs work under the supervision of MTs. Now, if you're talking about the supervisor of phlebotomy, then maybe an MLT can do that. But if you're talking about micro, immunology, chemistry, blood bank or hematology, I'd laugh to see a hospital employing an MLT to supervise in one of these departments.

It just doesn't make sense to have someone with just an associates degree supervise in one of these departments. In fact, many supervisor positions now like to see someone with a masters have that position much less a bachelors.

Reply

Giardia makes me smile in Thomasville, North Carolina

116 months ago

Brian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania said: How did this person graduate? Frankly, I am disgusted in the MLT program that graduated this person.

You are right, that* is* a disgrace. It wouldn’t happen at our school, that’s certain! We are told from day one that the bar is set high and failure to meet it means failure, pure and simple. They didn’t care if they had no one to graduate, we don’t get out until we can do the job. That is why I chose this program.

That poster would also likely be disgusted with the MT program around here that I *didn't* mention above. Yes, there is another one available but is a joke and not worth consideration. The only reason they even get practicum placements is because of an affiliation that seems well on its way to going sour. Their students don’t work in this area, where individuals know the quality (or lack thereof) of their graduates. So, is the quality of individuals this school puts out reflective of ALL MT's? Of course not, and it would be idiotic to even suggest such a thing.

What the article and you failed to call attention to are the individuals responsible for educating and weeding out those- less than competent -individuals, they are MT's. I know this because if they came from an accredited program, NAACLS required all those students to study and train under experienced and certified MT’s. One of your own decided they were ready and sent them out into the lab.

The MLT’s mentioned in that article are reflective of all or most MLT’s in the same way that those local MT graduates and the ones that trained those MLT’s are reflective of you.

They’re not.

Thanks for the article, though. I love Advance.

Reply

Highly Favored in Beech Grove, Indiana

116 months ago

I have been reading lately and its seems that very many people are unhappy because wages for the MT are low, but why not change professions if the wages make you unhappy.

Reply

Ariana in Riverview, Florida

116 months ago

I'm in school to become a MLT right now. The program is at a technical school (are you sneering???) and is 14 months long. It seems that here in Florida, the MLT's and the MT's do the same thing in the lab. I've been training under both during clinicals and their job duties don't differ. Both release results, both call up critical results, both work without direct supervision. The only difference between the two is the rate of pay. MLT's also work in Blood Bank. The only department in this hospital where MLT's don't work is Micro.

I sort of fell into this career choice. I initially wanted to be a RN, but chose not to have direct patient care. I stumbled upon this course at a technical school and signed up. I won't even have an Associate's degree when I'm finished, just a certificate.

I would never obtain a Bachelor's degree in this field. In my opinion, it would be a waste of my time and money. If I had the time and money to attend a 4 year university, it certainly wouldn't be for MT.

Once I'm finished with my certificate program, I can attend a local community college to get an Associate's degree for Medical Technology. You're able to test out as an MT and get licensed here in Florida with only a two year degree if you attend certain programs. So, with only two years invested I'll be making the same pay as other MT's.

I was in insurance and making $14/hour before I decided to go back to school. That's why I chose this field. It offers me a faster way to make more $$$. I also thought this field would be challenging, but lab work is easy for me. With the repetition, it won't take long to breeze right through my work day (and end up quickly bored by the profession).

I don't think the lab is the last stop for me careerwise. I'm still thinking of becoming a RN (Associate's Degree). I plan on working in the lab for 5 years or so until my son is 18 and in college, and will then return to school.

Reply

Mike in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

Ariana in Riverview, Florida said: I'm in school to become a MLT right now. The program is at a technical school (are you sneering???) and is 14 months long.

Wow 14 months ? Can you tell me if I can find a technical school b/c I want to get a Physical Therapy, Pharmacy, or Occupational Degree within that time frame. Hell if I go 16 months can I get a MD?

Reply

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

116 months ago

Ariana in Riverview, Florida said:
Once I'm finished with my certificate program, I can attend a local community college to get an Associate's degree for Medical Technology. You're able to test out as an MT and get licensed here in Florida with only a two year degree if you attend certain programs. So, with only two years invested I'll be making the same pay as other MT's.

QUOTE]

You are WRONG, you will NOT be able to test out of the MT test, I work in the state of florida and was recently licensed. If you are a MLT or CLT you will have take a specific test. You will get a license as a MLT or CLT ONLY. In order for you to obtain a MT/CLS license you would have to submit your transcripts and your ASCP or NCA offical certification to the state of florida department of health. They have SPECIFIC guidelines that tell you if you are eligible for a specific license. Do some research and look at the department of health website because you are completely incorrect.

Reply

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

116 months ago

Ariana when your done make sure you know the difference between a RBC and WBC b/c if you fail your profiency they will not hire you.

Reply

Ariana in Riverview, Florida

116 months ago

John1104 in Orlando, Florida said:

I don't think I'm wrong. If you COULDN'T become a technologist with a 2 year degree, it WOULDN'T be offered at the college. The state wouldn't allow a public community college to offer a program that isn't valid. I have every intention of taking an exam and becoming a licensed MT when I finish the 2 year program.

I'm not afraid of any proficiency test in the least. If you can't differentiate between a WBC and a RBC, you're in the wrong field.

Reply

John1104 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

116 months ago

The 2 year program is a MLT program. Download the form from the department of health website. The options are a 2 year AS MLT or a 4 year MT. There is no other way around it. The test they are accepting are the ASCP and the NCA. Both your AS degree and certification have to be official. One sent by the community college and the other sent by the certifying agency. MT programs are BS degree programs unless you already have a BS degree and you can recieve a additional one with probably a year or so training in CLS courses. Then you have to pass the ASCP or NCA.

Reply

Ariana in Riverview, Florida

116 months ago

AAB offers this:

"Earn an associate degree or an associate of applied science degree, or the equivalent, from an accredited institution with a major in a laboratory science or medical technology.

The equivalent of an associate degree is defined as sixty (60) semester hours, of which twenty-four (24) semester hours are either:

medical laboratory technology courses, or

six (6) semester hours of chemistry; six (6) semester hours of biology; and twelve (12) semester hours of courses in chemistry, biology or medical laboratory technology in any combination.

In addition, individuals qualifying under route #3 must also obtain three years of acceptable full-time experience in the applicable technical disciplines.

Individuals who lack three (3) years of acceptable full-time experience may still challenge the MT(AAB) examination. Upon passing the examination, these individuals will be designated medical technologist-provisional [MT-P(AAB)] until they complete three (3) years of acceptable full-time experience in the applicable technical disciplines, at which time the provisional status will be removed."

What's three years? I plan on being in this field longer than that. My point is that there are other ways. First, I'd like to point out that I'll be a MLT and I didn't attend college for two years.

If the state of Florida won't license me, then I'll move to a state that doesn't require a license as long as the pay would be lucrative. Where there's a will, there's a way. I just know I'm NOT getting a Bachelor's degree in this profession. I don't even understand WHY anyone even needs a 4 year degree. This isn't medical school. Once you get a job in a certain department, it's simply becoming an expert through repetition. I'll just find the easiest route to the most money. If I absolutely can't (and I still think I can) become a MT with an Associate's degree, I'll just be a MLT until I'm ready to move on to greener pastures.

Reply

John1104 in Orlando, Florida

116 months ago

Most if not all students that have graduated from a MLT/MT program in the US have taken either the ASCP or NCA. If you want to move around I recommend you take either of those two. Just look at the job postings, not in FL, b/c it will say FL license. Look at other states, a majority say ASCP. Laboratory Directors (you know the ones that HIRE YOU) have those credentials. So they will usually hire people with the same credentials.

Florida use to give their own individual test, now they accept the ASCP or NCA. There are plenty of other certifications but you might be SOL if some employers do not accept them. So if AAB says your a MT with a associate degree, you can say you are but some employers will not even consider you as a MT.

Reply

Page:  « Previous   1  2  3  4  5  Next »   Last »

» Sign in or create an account to comment on this topic.