Veterinary assistant online programs and veterinary technology online programs

Comments (6)

eaw2horses in Edwardsville, Illinois

75 months ago

I have been looking at the ashworth college and the animal behavior colleges for veterinary assisting programs and wondered if anyone had any experience with them or and reviews of them. I have also looked at the veterinary technology programs at some online colleges but am not sure which are best and I've seen a few. My catch is that it has to be online due to schedule and kids and also that it can't cost a lot and if it does then they have to be able to offer financial aid. I have gone to some college before like the vet tech intstitute at hickey college and I tried out brown Mackie college to and wasn't happy with either of them.

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pennylanebt in Wellsville, New York

74 months ago

eaw2horses in Edwardsville, Illinois said: I have been looking at the ashworth college and the animal behavior colleges for veterinary assisting programs and wondered if anyone had any experience with them or and reviews of them. I have also looked at the veterinary technology programs at some online colleges but am not sure which are best and I've seen a few. My catch is that it has to be online due to schedule and kids and also that it can't cost a lot and if it does then they have to be able to offer financial aid. I have gone to some college before like the vet tech intstitute at hickey college and I tried out brown Mackie college to and wasn't happy with either of them.

I took the Veterinary Assistant/Animal Care Specialist program via Ashworth. I liked it, and the texts are Vet Tech level. So, if you take the class, I would suggest reading and studying more than is required. Everything you learn and can take to the table at an interview is a plus. :)

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

74 months ago

Veterinary assisting programs are not required in any state nor are they accredited through the American Veterinary Medical Assoc. They can be offered by anyone regardless of level of education or experience, so you MUST be cautious when you consider one of these programs. For example, the ABC program doesn't list a veterinarian or veterinarian technician as being involved in their program on the website and when I tried to get information on who wrote the program materials I was given the run around. This sends up a red flag for me because they can't/won't tell me that there are any people involved in the program (teaching or writing) that are veterinary medical professionals. Always look for one that is approved through a veterinary medical or veterinary technical professional association and taught by veterinary medical professionals.

But also remember that in the scheme of things, a veterinary assistant program is only going to be of limited value because they typically do not count as college credits towards a degree in veterinary technology nor will they transfer to a veterinary technology diploma program. Without completing an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program, you cannot move up to a veterinary technician in most states because most require you to be licensed to work as a veterinary technician. Veterinary assistant programs are also not widely respected in the veterinary medical field so choosing one may not give you any help in finding a job.

Veterinary technician programs are "better" if they are actually AVMA accredited programs because you can be assured that they are written and taught by veterinary professionals. There is a very structured and extensive set of criteria that must be met by the programs to be AVMA accredited including a minimum of 240 hours or required clinical instruction. AVMA accredited program in veterinary technology also meet the requirements to become credentialed and work as veterinary technician

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

74 months ago

What I am saying is be sure you know what you are getting into and that the program you choose meets your needs/goals.

If you don't want to become credentialed as a veterinary technician, then a veterinary assistant program may be a good choice to provide you with a basic understanding of skills and tasks in a veterinary setting. You just need to be sure you choose one that has reliable information (one written and taught by veterinary professionals.) It's only a waste to spend time gaining knowledge if you are taught incorrect information.

But if you want to move above an entry-level position and entry-level pay scale, then you need to consider a veterinary technology program that is AVMA accredited. Veterinary technicians are typically allowed to perform more tasks with less supervision and that means that they tend to make more than veterinary assistants.

Anyone considering either of these options should at the very least shadow a technician and assistant and see what the positions entail and then review the laws in their state about credentialing and duties allowed.

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Mom23Bostons in Milford, Delaware

24 months ago

I just read that Ashworth had applied and was accepted to be avma approved in 2018????

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CindyRVT in Henderson, Texas

23 months ago

Ashworth has applied to be considered for AVMA accreditation. They will have a site visit in 2018 for their program to be reviewed and then the AVMA Committee for Veterinary Technician Education and Activities will review the report and decide whether or not to grant initial accreditation.

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