How to Hire a Phlebotomist

Does your growing business need a phlebotomist? Phlebotomists can help your company improve patient care.

Here are some tips to help you find great phlebotomist candidates and make the right hire for your business.

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Phlebotomists searching for jobs on Indeed*

232,880

Job seekers that clicked phlebotomist jobs

66,830

Resumes for job seekers with phlebotomist experience on Indeed

12,810

Phlebotomist jobs that received clicks

What is the cost of hiring phlebotomist?

  • Common salary in US: $34,036 yearly
  • Typical salaries range from $16,000$59,000 yearly
  • Find more information on Indeed Salary

*Indeed data (US) – April 2021

As of April 2021, phlebotomist jobs in the U.S. are less competitive compared to other job markets, with an average of 18 job seekers per phlebotomist job.

Why hire a phlebotomist?

A great phlebotomist hire can help your business:

  • Increase the number of patients
  • Conduct better research
  • Improve patient care

Deciding between a full-time vs freelance phlebotomist

Before writing a phlebotomist job description or interviewing candidates, assess whether you need a freelance or full-time phlebotomist.

Full-time phlebotomists are found in traditional medical environments such as hospitals, doctors’ offices, nursing homes, clinics and laboratories. They may work in a specialized department (e.g., pathology department) and be responsible for reporting discrepancies in patient records to colleagues.

Freelance phlebotomists are typically mobile phlebotomists, working independently to service testing labs and clinics. They’re responsible for acquiring needles, collection tubes, gloves, sanitizing wipes and other medical equipment needed to properly perform the job. Freelance phlebotomists can treat patients as a fee-for-service operation.

What are the titles of phlebotomists?

When you’re planning to hire a phlebotomist, it’s important to understand different job titles in the field. Phlebotomists work in a variety of settings, assisting other medical professionals by collecting patients’ blood, tissue and fluid samples. Here are some of the most common titles for phlebotomists:

  • Phlebotomist technician (aka certified phlebotomy technician or clinical phlebotomist): Phlebotomy techs are trained to collect patients’ blood using techniques such as venipuncture, dermal puncture and arterial blood gas sampling. They typically work in hospitals and clinics for testing, research and donation purposes.
  • Mobile phlebotomist: Mobile phlebotomists provide outpatient care by traveling to different locations to draw blood for labs or blood banks.
  • Therapeutic phlebotomist: These phlebotomists draw blood to treat medical conditions such as hemochromatosis.
  • Pediatric phlebotomist: Pediatric phlebotomists collect blood samples from infants and young children.
  • Geriatric phlebotomist: Geriatric phlebotomists collect blood samples from the elderly, often working in nursing homes.

Where to find phlebotomists

To find the right phlebotomist for your business, consider trying out a few different recruiting strategies:

  • Find a lab. Clinical labs that perform extensive bloodwork testing require phlebotomists. See if there are any part-time phlebotomists who are interested in joining your company.
  • Attend a blood donation drive. Phlebotomists are necessary staff members at blood banks. You may be able to find trained volunteers or part-time workers open to new opportunities.
  • Ask medical professionals. Ask doctors, nurses, clinicians or other medical professionals if they know someone qualified for the job.
  • Post a help wanted sign in your window. Post a help wanted ad in your window to attract potential candidates.
  • Post your job online. Try posting your phlebotomist job on Indeed to find and attract quality phlebotomist candidates.

What are the titles of phlebotomists?

When you’re planning to hire a phlebotomist, it’s important to understand different job titles in the field. Phlebotomists work in a variety of settings, assisting other medical professionals by collecting patients’ blood, tissue and fluid samples. Here are some of the most common titles for phlebotomists:

  • Phlebotomist technician (aka certified phlebotomy technician or clinical phlebotomist): Phlebotomy techs are trained to collect patients’ blood using techniques such as venipuncture, dermal puncture and arterial blood gas sampling. They typically work in hospitals and clinics for testing, research and donation purposes.
  • Mobile phlebotomist: Mobile phlebotomists provide outpatient care by traveling to different locations to draw blood for labs or blood banks.
  • Therapeutic phlebotomist: These phlebotomists draw blood to treat medical conditions such as hemochromatosis.
  • Pediatric phlebotomist: Pediatric phlebotomists collect blood samples from infants and young children.
  • Geriatric phlebotomist: Geriatric phlebotomists collect blood samples from the elderly, often working in nursing homes.

Writing a phlebotomist job description

A thoughtful description is important to finding qualified phlebotomist candidates. A phlebotomist job description includes a compelling summary of the role, a detailed list of duties and responsibilities and the required and preferred skills for the position.

When writing your phlebotomist job description, consider including some or all of the following keywords to improve the visibility of your job posting. These are the most popular search terms leading to clicks on phlebotomist jobs, according to Indeed data:

  • Phlebotomist
  • Phlebotomy
  • Healthcare
  • Medical
  • Phlebotomist
  • Laboratory
  • Traveling phlebotomist
  • Phlebotomist technician
  • Mobile phlebotomist
  • Hospital

Interviewing phlebotomist candidates

Strong candidates for phlebotomist positions will be confident answering questions regarding:

  • Human anatomy
  • Medical software
  • Blood safety measures

Need help coming up with interview questions? See our list of phlebotomist interview questions for examples (with sample answers).

FAQs about how to hire a phlebotomist

How many patients should a phlebotomist draw in one hour?

Patient cycles depend on the number of incoming patients and available phlebotomists as well as the staff’s experience level.

How many times can a phlebotomist stick a patient?

Though attempts can be made at different sites, the most common professional standard is two venipuncture attempts per clinician and no more than four total. Each subsequent attempt requires the patient’s informed consent.

What does a phlebotomist wear?

Phlebotomists wear conventional medical scrubs and rubber shoes. When significant blood exposure is possible, wearing goggles, face masks and other personal protective equipment is advised.

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