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Biomedical Engineer Interview Questions

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  1. How does your education and career path qualify you for this position? See answer
  2. This position will require working on a specific facet of bioengineering. Do you have any relevant experience in this field of work? See answer
  3. Have you ever personally designed or built a bioprosthetic device? See answer
  4. What do you see as the moral limits of biomedical engineering? See answer
  5. Would you be more likely to describe yourself as a medical professional or as an engineer? See answer
  6. Tell me about systems physiology. See answer
  7. Discuss myoelectric control and its applications in the field of prosthetics.
  8. What is DNA fingerprinting? Is it the same thing as therapeutic cloning and what are its applications?
  9. Mention the three medical imaging technologies you are most familiar with and their uses.
  10. Explain bioinstrumentation and its applications in biomedical engineering.
  11. Define a microarray. What is the tool used for?
  12. What is therapeutic cloning and how is the technology used?
  13. What is rehabilitation engineering? Who can benefit from it?
  14. Explain biomechanics and mention five examples of biomechanical devices used today.
  15. Mention the common characteristics of viruses. List the differences between a provirus and a retrovirus.
  16. Explain isotopic tracer technique and its applications in the biomedical engineering industry.
  17. How is Alzheimer’s disease diagnosed? Mention three symptoms of the disease and the demographic that is most at risk of having the disease.
  18. What are pathogens? What are their common characteristics?
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6 Biomedical Engineer Interview Questions and Answers

Q:

How does your education and career path qualify you for this position?

A:

Biomedical engineering is a multifaceted field, and you don’t always need to find a person with a master’s degree in a single, specific field. This is a profession that brings together people from many disciplines, including electrical engineering, software engineering, biology and medicine. It is a good idea to look for a biomedical engineer with multifaceted knowledge that fits the duties you need to have performed. What to look for in an answer:

  • Education or experience that is relevant to the position
  • A multifaceted background
  • Apprenticeship or work-study experience
Example:

“I have a degree in electrical engineering from a respected university. I completed several apprenticeships and work-study programs in medical technology. I have also studied chemistry and biology to a lesser extent.”

Q:

This position will require working on a specific facet of bioengineering. Do you have any relevant experience in this field of work?

A:

Many biomedical engineers focus on one or two very specific parts of the field. Although lack of experience should not necessarily disqualify an applicant, it is a factor that must be considered. Hiring an inexperienced person will always involve some risk, but it can pay off very well if you choose wisely. You should inquire as to the specific devices and materials that they have used in their previous positions and how they relate to your organization’s needs. What to look for in an answer:

  • Experience with at least one other company
  • Specific interest in a field relevant to the position
  • The ability to learn quickly and listen to colleagues with more experience
Example:

“Yes. I worked for a biomedical company for the last three years doing research and development in the same type of medical device manufacturing.”

Q:

Have you ever personally designed or built a bioprosthetic device?

A:

This question can be substituted with the tasks you want completed by the biomedical engineer. One of the most common uses for biomedical engineering is the creation of artificial limbs, artificial hearts and other prosthetic devices. If your applicant has successfully designed and built one, and this is what you are hiring them to do, then it will require less training to get them to a place where they are an employee of value. What to look for in an answer:

  • A history of hands-on work on similar projects
  • Confidence in the steps needed to do the tasks
  • Detailed knowledge of the subject
Example:

“Yes, I designed an artificial limb during the course of my education, and later worked for a biotech company that manufactures such limbs, designing and building several prototypes.”

Q:

What do you see as the moral limits of biomedical engineering?

A:

Biomedical engineering represents a crossroads between human beings and mechanical devices. As such, there are definite moral and ethical implications that any competent professional should have considered. Businesses often have to find the line between ethics and innovation, and it helps to understand the mindset of the employees you are hiring, especially those who will work in management positions. What to look for in an answer:

  • A clear understanding of ethics
  • An acknowledgment of professional limitations
  • An understanding of risk prevention and the implications for a business
Example:

“While I am excited about the prospect of enhancing human life and capability, I think it is important to understand that there are reasonable and moral limits that should be used as guiding principles.”

Q:

Would you be more likely to describe yourself as a medical professional or as an engineer?

A:

This question provides a way to gauge the interests of an applicant so that you can tell what they really want to do. Their response will show you which side of the bioengineering field matters the most to them. In some cases, it may be helpful to have a team composed of engineers with both perspectives working together on big projects. What to look for in an answer:

  • A clear and concise answer
  • Balance in their skills and knowledge
  • Respect for both sides of the profession
Example:

“Because I was educated and trained as an engineer, I cannot technically consider myself to be a medical professional. However, I have studied human biology extensively, and I utilize many of the same ideas and concepts used by doctors and other medical specialists.”

Q:

Tell me about systems physiology.

A:

Biomedical engineers must understand every aspect of their job, including areas like systems physiology. This question gives interviewers an opportunity to gauge candidates' understanding of underlying principles of the profession. A skilled biomedical candidate will have an in-depth understanding of systems physiology, its influence on the development of pharmaceutical products and prosthetics and its applications in modeling and experimentation. The candidate's answer should emphasize:

  • Professionalism
  • A deep understanding of biomedical engineering
  • Pharmaceuticals and prosthetics development
Example:

“Systems physiology is the study of the functions of systems within living organisms at the microscopic level. It provides insights into disease response, metabolic systems, skin healing and other important variables that guide the development of new pharmaceutical products and biomedical devices. The discipline is vital when designing new drugs and prosthetics as it helps us identify potential adverse effects on users, which allows for safer and more effective medications and artificial limbs.”

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