Business Administrator Job Description: Top Duties and Qualifications

Last updated: June 22, 2022

A Business Administrator, or Business Director, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of a business. Their duties include hiring staff members, leading department meetings and communicating with upper-management to implement new policies and procedures among daily operations.

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Business Administrator duties and responsibilities

Business Administrators complete organizational and management tasks that support the productivity and growth of an entire organization and its individual departments or teams. They often have the following responsibilities:

  • Plan strategies for streamlining and improving business operations
  • Reorganize or hire staff to expand operations in collaboration with human resources teams
  • Handle business finances and plan the budget with the help of finance and accounting leaders and team members
  • Oversee marketing and promotions for a company’s products and services, collaborating with marketing, advertising and public relations teams
  • Negotiate vendor contracts to identify cost-saving opportunities
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What does a Business Administrator do?

Business Administrators typically work for corporations to provide leadership to staff across departments. They coordinate with department heads to evaluate employee work performance and strategize ways to achieve department goals. Their job is to set department budgets, establish financial goals and make sure that all employees have the resources they need to perform well at their jobs. They may also research and implement new IT systems to streamline business operations.

Business Administrator skills and qualifications

Business Administrators use a variety of soft skills and industry knowledge to provide the most comprehensive leadership and management they can. These skills and qualifications can include:

  • Excellent communication skills, including writing, public speaking and interpersonal communication
  • Great analytical, critical thinking and problem-solving abilities
  • Strong time management and organizational skills
  • Good goal-setting, strategic planning and motivation skills
  • Ability to work in fast-paced environments 
  • Experience with a variety of personalities and backgrounds in the workplace
  • Superior presentation and negotiation skills
  • Knowledge of best finance and operations practices for their industry

Business Administrator salary expectations

A Business Administrator earns an average of $44,739 per year. Salary may depend on the level of education, experience and geographical location.

Business Administrator education and training requirements

Many candidates have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in business administration, accounting, finance, human resources or another business field. Others may have a bachelor’s degree in a field relevant to their industry, such as in engineering or health care sciences. Some candidates may have pursued a master’s degree, such as a Master of Business Administration or others in the business and finance disciplines. Depending on the needs of an organization, candidates with education, training or professional certification in accounting and finance, human resources, management and marketing may also be beneficial.

Business Administrator experience requirements

Since this is a managerial role, candidates are likely to have years of experience in departments like general operations, administration, finance and accounting or human resources. Some may have experience in multiple or all of these departments or even other departments not listed. Candidates should also have years of experience working within their chosen industry to ensure they are familiar with industry-specific policies, procedures, regulations and best practices. 

Candidates should have at least 3 to 5 years of experience in the industry in which they’re applying, such as for government agencies, educational institutions, nonprofit organizations or health care organizations.

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Frequently asked questions about Business Administrators

 

What is the difference between a Business Administrator and a Business Manager?

Although some companies use the titles Business Administrator and Business Manager interchangeably, there is a difference between these two roles. The main difference between a Business Administrator and a Business Manager is that a Business Administrator typically holds a more senior role within the company. For example, a Business Manager oversees one department or company branch, whereas a Business Administrator oversees all Business Managers and their departments or branch locations. 

 

What are the daily duties of a Business Administrator?

On a typical day, a Business Administrator starts by receiving messages and checking their email. They respond to time-sensitive messages and review their priorities for the workday. Throughout the day, they review financial reports, sales data and progress reports to determine the current state of company operations and what needs improvement. They meet with department managers to answer questions, take suggestions and familiarize them with new policies and procedures. They may also travel to different branches to meet with Branch Managers and relay information from upper management.

 

What qualities make a good Business Administrator?

A good Business Administrator is someone who isn’t afraid to make difficult decisions to benefit their company. For example, implementing department-wide budget cuts may affect daily operations, but it could also save the company from having to layoff employees later on. Business Administrators should have a personable nature that enables them to have positive interactions with managers and lower-level company employees. They should also have excellent interpersonal communication so they can adjust their language depending on who they speak to. 

A good Business Administrator has an innovative mindset that enables them to come up with creative solutions to things like communication barriers or financial limitations. Business Administrators should have the ability to analyze company data and use their findings to influence their decision making.

 

Who does a Business Administrator report to?

A Business Administrator typically reports to an executive role like the company Vice President. This role connects Business Administrators with more senior executives and relays information from upper management. Business Administrators working at smaller companies may report directly to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

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